ognizant Communication Corporation

ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RESEARCH
The International Journal

ABSTRACTS
Volume 32, Numbers 1/2

Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 32, pp. 1-14, 2007
0360-1293/07 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

Reducing the In-Vitro Electromagnetic Field Effect of Cellular Phones on Human DNA and the Intensity of Their Emitted Radiation

Maria Syldona, Ph.D.
Quantum Biology Research Lab, Ridgway, CO, USA; Formerly Adjunct Professor at Dept. of Psychiatry, State University of NY at Stony Brook, Medical School

Abstract: Several studies have demonstrated detrimental effects of cellular phone radiation on in-vitro biological systems.  This article introduces a novel in-vitro method for demonstrating conformational changes in human DNA induced by a 5 minute exposure to cellular phone radiation emitted by an actual contemporary cellular phone.  Dynamic changes in DNA conformation was determined in real-time by measuring the rate of DNA rewinding (in a spectrophotometer) following exposure to heat which causes the unwinding of the two strands of the helix.  Cellular phone radiation produced a 40% increase in the rate of DNA rewinding.  This effect was 95% attenuated when the experiment was repeated with the same cellular phone to which was attached a commercially available shielding disk shaped sheet containing a paramagnetic mineral.  In a separate series of experiments the intensity of the cellular phone radiation was measured using an electromagnetic frequency spectrum analyzer.  The intensity was reduced by approximately 50% in the presence of the shielding disk.  Taken together these studies indicate the efficacy of a shielding disk to protect the body from cellular phone radiation.

Key words: Cellular phones; EM radiation; DNA rewinding; DNA conformation; EM shielding device

Correspondence: Maria Syldona, Quantum Biology Research Lab, PO Box 428, Ridgway, CO 91432, USA




Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 32, pp. 15-30, 2007
0360-1293/07 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

Anxiety Control of Dental Patients by Clinical Combination of Acupuncture, Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, and Eye Movement Desensitization with Sedation Via Submucosal Route

Dominic P. Lu, D.D.S., F.I.C.A.E., F.A.G.D., F.R.S.H. (Engl), F.I.C.D.
Professor of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; Director of Medical and Dental Externship Education, Lehigh Valley Hospital/Penn State University College of Medicine; President, American Society for the Advancement of Anesthesia in Dentistry

Gabriel P. Lu, M.D., Ph.D., F.I.C.A.E., F.A.C.A.
Professor of Clinical Anesthesiology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Director of Acupuncture Clinic, Montefiore Medical Center

Winston I. Lu, R.P.H., Pharm.D.
Staff Pharmacist, Walgreen Pharmacy, El Paso, TX

Abstract: The data presented in this article was collected after reviewing clinical findings gathered from using various anxiety control methods on apprehensive patients.  We examined clinical applications of the eye movement (EM) component of Eye Movement Desensitization (EMD) on fearful dental patients who have histories of traumatic dental experiences.  We also used Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) to select the proper dosage of sedative to minimize the adverse side effects.  For patients who did not respond well to EM, we used BDORT to select the proper sedative medication and its dosage.  In certain difficult cases, we supplemented these techniques with acupuncture to augment the sedative effects.  Findings were based on the clinical impressions and assessments of both the patients and the operating team.  Results showed that EM, although effective in enabling patients to undergo non-invasive dental procedures such as clinical examination and simple prophylaxis, had only limited beneficial effect with invasive procedures such as extraction, drilling, and injections, etc.  We also found that BDORT greatly reduced adverse side effects of sedatives such as hypertension, hypotension, hypoxia, tachycardia, bradycardia, nausea, and vomiting.  For most apprehensive patients, we found that EMD and acupuncture combined with BDORT predetermined dosage for the submucosal sedation enabled these patients to undergo the complete dental treatment.  The authors try to explain the mechanism of BDORT and EM in terms of visual awareness (or consciousness) and preferred patterns, where neurons in the brain respond to the actions and/or direction of movement.  The authors believe that BDORT and EM could have better results if the persons performing BDORT have visual awareness and are focused on the task; whereas in EM, the patient's eye on the therapist's hand movements.  A more focused approach via visual pathway will result in more favorable results in EM.  Likewise, performing BDORT absentmindedly could lead to false results if visual awareness or (or consciousness) is absent.  "Preferred pattern" will arouse neurons in the brain to cause conscientiousness, and performing BDORT and "open eyes" arouse the necessary visual awareness that is necessary for the successful performance of BDORT tasks.

Key words: Bi-Digital O-Ring Test, Acupuncture, Eye Movement Desensitization, Dental phobic patients, Anxiety, Visual pathway, Preferred patterns, Pharmacological sedation

Correspondence: F.P. Lu, D.D.S.; Tel: 610-298-8805; Fax: 610-298-8705




Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 32, pp. 31-70, 2007
0360-1293/07 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

Anatomical Relationship Between Traditional Acupuncture Point ST 36 and Omura's ST 36 (true ST 36) with their Therapeutic Effects: 1) Inhibition of Cancer Cell Division by Markedly Lowering Cancer Cell Telomere While Increasing Normal Cell Telomere, 2) Improving Circulatory Disturbances, with Reduction of Abnormal Increase in  High Triglyceride, L-Homocystein, CRP, or Cardiac Troponin I & T in Blood by the Stimulation of Omura's ST 36 - Part 1

Yashiaki Omura, M.D. Sc.D., F.I.C.A.E.
Director of Medical Research, Heart Disease, Research Foundation; Adjunct Prof. Dept. of Community & Preventive Medicine, new York Medical College; President, Int'l College of Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics; Prof., Dept. of Non-Orthodox Medicine, Ukrainian National Kiev Medical University

Yemeng Chen, O.M.D. (China), L.Ac., F.I.C.A.E.
President & Academic Dean of New York College of Traditional Chinese Medicine; Former Director, Acupuncture Clinic, Shanghai Medical University Hospital

Dominic P. Lu, D.D.S., F.I.C.A.E.
Professor of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; Director of Medical and Dental Externship Education, Lehigh Valley Hospital/Penn State University College of Medicine; President, American Association for the Advancement of Anesthesia in Dentistry

Yasuhiro Shimostsura, M.D., F.I.C.A.E.
Vice President, Japan Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Medical Society; Executive Member, ORT Life Science Research Institute, Kurume City, Japan

Motomu Ohki, M.S., F.I.C.A.E. (Honorary)
Senior Scientist ORT Life Science Research Institute, Kurume City, Japan

Harsha Duvvi, M.D., M.P.H., F.I.C.A.E.
Assistant Prof, Dept. of Community & Preventative Medicine & Assistant Prof, Dept. of Neurology, New York Medical College

Abstract: Using Bi-Digital O-Ring Tes Resonance Phenomena between 2 identical substances, Omura, Y. succeeded in making the image of the outline of internal organs without use of standard imaging devices since 1982.  When he imaged the outline of the stomach on the abdominal wall, a number of lines came out from upper and lower parts of stomach wall.  When the lines were followed, they were very close to the well-known stomach meridians.  Subsequently, he found a method of localizing meridians and their corresponding acupuncture points as well as shapes and diameters accurately.  At the anatomical location of ST 36 described in traditional textbooks, Omura, Y. found there is no acupuncture point.  However, in the close vicinity, there is an acupuncture point which he named as true ST 36 in the mid 1980s, but it is generally known as Omura's ST 36.  When the effects of the acupuncture on these 2 locations were compared, Omura's ST 36 (true ST 36) produced very significant well-known acupuncture beneficial effects including improved circulation and blood chemistry, while in the traditional ST 36, the effects were small.  In this article, the anatomical relationship between these two acupuncture points, which a short distance of 0.6~1.5 cm between the centers of these locations, was described.  In early 2000, Omura, Y. found press Needle Simulation of Omura's ST 36, using "Press-Release" procedure repeated 200 times, , 4 times a day to cancer patients reduced high cancer cell telomere of 600-1500ng and high Oncogen C-fos Ab2 and integrin a5b1 of 100-700ng BDORT units to close to 1yg ( = 10-24 g ) BDORT units.  In addition there was a significant reduction of Asbestos and HG from cancer cells, while markedly reduced normal cell telomere of 1yg was increased to optimally high amounts of 500-530ng BDORTunits.  Thus, cancer cells can no longer divide and cancer activity inhibited.  The authors have successfully applied this method for a variety of cancers as well as for cardio-vascular diseases with hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, high L-homocystein, and CRP, high cardiac Troponim I & T, and some hypertension.  These beneficial effects were accompanied by euphoria, & relaxation with increased alpha waves in EEG.  Thus Omura's ST 36 stimulation is a safe, effective, and highly desirable supplemental treatment.  In addition to manual stimulation, similar beneficial effects can be induced by finger tip stimulation (without any needle) or with electroacupuncture stimulation, (+) Qi Gong energy stored paper and (+) solar energy stored paper which often resulted in significant clinical improvement.

Key words: Acupuncture; Omura's ST 36 (true ST 36); Traditional acupuncture point ST 36; Shape & diameter of acupuncture point; Press needle stimulation; Telomere; Oncogen C-fos Ab2; Cancer treatment; Triglyceride; Circulatory disturbance; Solar energy; Qigong (Qi Gong); Chlamydia trachomatis

Correspondence: Dr. Yoshiaki Omura; Tel: 212-781-6262; Fax: 212-923-2279; E-mail: icaet@yahoo.com




Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 32, pp. 71-79, 2007
0360-1293/07 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

Comparison of the Effectiveness of the Traditional Acupuncture Point, ST.36 and Omura's ST.36 Point (True ST.36) Needling on the Isokinetic Knee Extension & Flexion Strength of Young Soccer Players

Kemal Nuri Ozerkan, M.D., Ph.D., F.,I.C.A.E., Associate Professor
Istanbul University, School of Physical Education and Sport, Physical Education Teaching Department

Bulent Bayraktar, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor
Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Department of Sports Medicine

Turker Sahinkaya, Ms.
Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Department of Sports Medicine

Omer Can Gaksu, Ph.D.
Istanbul University, School of Physical Education and Sport, Physical Education Teaching Department

Ilker Yucesir, M.D., Ph.D.
Istanbul University, School of Physical Education and Sport, Health Sciences Department

Safinaz Yildiz, Ph.D., Professor
Istanbul University, Istanbul Medical Faculty, Department of Sports Medicine

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of the traditional acupuncture point ST.36 and "Omura's ST.36 Point" ("True ST.36") needling on the isokinetic knee extension & flexion strength of young soccer players.  The Bi-Digital I-Ring Test (B.D.O.R.T.) of Yoshiaki Omura, M.D., Sc.D. was used to determine the "True ST.36"  Young soccer players (N=24) between 16-18 years of age (Mean = 16.92 ± 0.65) were involved in the study.  The extension & flexion strengths of dominate legs were measured with Cybex 250 Extremity System isokinetically.  The testing velocity was 60º/sec.  The peak torque value in Newton meters (Nm) was evaluated.  Subjects were tested 3 times.  Extension & Plexion 1 (EXT1, FLEX1) without acupuncture application, EXT2 & FLEX2 after application on the traditional acupuncture point, ST.36 and EXT3 & FLEX3 after application onto the "Omura's New Foot-point" ("True ST.36").  Before each test, subjects warmed up for 10 minutes by cycling on an isokinetic ergometer at 50 RPM, 75 Watts load followed by stretching exercises of lower extremity.  Mean EXT1, EXT2, EXT3 values were 196,92±28,70; 210,00±23,00; 224,42±21,70 respectively, where FLEX1, FLEX2, FLEX3 were 140,77±22,45; 151,13±21,27; 161,00±22,23.  Comparisons fo EXT1-EXT2, EXT1-EXT3, EXT2-EXT3, FLEX1-FLEX2, FLEX1-FLEX3, FELX2-FLEX3 strength values showed all very high significance (P<0,001) in favor of 1) Needling on relevant points and 2) Omura's ST.36 point ("True ST.36").  We conclude that B/D/O/R/T/ can help to determine new (True) acupuncture points and, both points were effective for increasing the isokinetic knee extension & flexion strength of young soccer players very significantly where as Omura's ST.36 Point ("True ST.36") was more effective that traditional acupuncture point, ST.36.

Key words: Isokinetic dynamometer; Cybex; Soccer player; Traditional acupuncture point ST.36; Omura's ST.36 point; True ST.36

Correspondence: Kemal Nuri Ozerkan, M.D.; E-mail: kozerkan@gmail.com




Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 32, pp. 81-86, 2007
0360-1293/07 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

Depth of Penetration of an 850nm Wavelength Low Level Laser in Human Skin

Alan Esnouf, M.Sc.
Lecturer, School of Health Sciences and Social Care, Brunel University, Uxbridge Campus, UB8 3PH, UK

Philip A. Wright, Ph.D.
Wessex Specialist Laser Centre, Salisbury District Hospital, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP2 8BJ, UK

Joan C. Moore, D.Phil. (Oxford University)
Wessex Specialist Laser Centre, Salisbury District Hospital, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP2 8BJ, UK

Salim Ahmed, B.M., M.D.
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Aberdeen AB25 2ZN, UK

Abstract: Low Level Laser Therapy is used for a wide variety of conditions including superficial skin sores, musculoskeletal and joint problems, and dentistry.  Knowledge of the penetration depth of laser radiation in human skin is an essential prerequisite to identifying its method of action.  Mathematical simulations and estimates from the literature suggest that the depth of penetration of laser radiation using wavelengths from 630nm up to 1100nm may be up to 50nm.  The aim of this study is to directly measure the penetration depth of a low Level Laser in human tissue.  Human abdominal skin samples up to 0.784mm thickness were harvested by dermatome following Gallium Aluminium Arsenide Laser (Wavelength 850nm near infra-red invisible light, 100mW, 24kHz, 0.28mm diameter probe) and the transmitted radiation measure with an Ophir Optronics "Nova" external energy meter.  The intensity of laser radiation reduced by 66% after being transmitted through a 0.784mm sample of human abdominal tissue.  In this study most laser radiation was absorbed within the first 1mm or skin.

Key words: Low Level Laser; Aluminium Gallium Arsenide; Human skin penetration; 850nm wavelength

Correspondence: Alan Esnouf, Lecturer, School of Health Sciences and Social Care, Brunel University, Uxbridge Campus, UB8 3PH, UK; Tel: +44(0)18952 68757; Fax: +44(0)2088472030; E-mail: alan.esnouf@brunel.ac.uk




Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 32, pp. 87-96, 2007
0360-1293/07 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

How to Standardize 3 Finger Positions of Examiner for Palpating Radial Pulses at Wrist in Traditional Chinese Medicine

Chu-Change Tyan, M.D., Ph.D. candidate, Research Felloe
Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, China Medicla University (CMU), Dept. of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University Hospital (CMUH), Taichung, Taiwan

Wen-Miin Liang, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Graduate Institute of Environmental Health, Biostatistics Center, CMU, Taichung, Taiwan

Haw-Yaw Shy, Ph.D., Associate Professor
Dept of Mathematics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua, Taiwan

Hsien-Wen Kuo, Ph.D., Professor
Graduate Institute of Environmental Health, CMU, Taichung, Taiwan

Jaung-Geng Lin, M.D., Ph.D., Professor
Graduate Institute of Chinese Medical Science, CMU, Taichung, Taiwan

Hung-Wei Chen, M.S., Research Fellow
Graduate Institute of Environmental Health, Biostatistics Center, CMU, Taichung, Taiwan

Jian-Jung Chen, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Director
Dept. of Chinese Medicine, Taichung Tzu Chi General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan

Abstract: This study was to provide a standardized definition of the positioning method of finger placement on the radial artery for pulse diagnosis in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM); that is, to define the locations of CUn, Guan, and Chi in TCM.  A total of 200 subjects (100 males and 100 females, 18-40 years of age) were recruited from the general population.  According to ancient TCM records, the "6% of the elbow length" (ELx6%) is used as the standard method of establishing the length of Cun.  We hypothesized that the highest point of "prominent bone" (PB) is the lower limit of Cun, so "the distance between the distal wrist crease and the highest point of the PD" (DWP) is considered the length of Cun.  If this hypothesis holds, then we can define the locations of Cun, Guan, and Chi by using the ratio 6:6:7 from the ancient TCM records.  The distribution of relative bias and paired t-test were used to verify the findings.  The mean value of relative bias of DWP compared with ELx6% was close to 0% (males=2.1%, SD=12.2%; females=0.2%, SD=12.6%).  The paired t-test confirmed that there was no significant difference (p>0.05) between the mean values of the DWP and ELx6%.  Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that the length of the Cun is equal to the length of the DWP.  Our findings confirm that the location of Cun is from the distal wrist crease to the highest point of PB.

Key words: Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM); Pulse diagnosis; Radial artery; Wrist crease; Styloid process

Correspondence: Dr. Jian-Jung Chen, Department of Chinese Medicine, Taichung Tzu Chi General Hosptial, No.66, Sec. 1, Fongsing Rd., Tanzih Township, Taichung 427, Taiwan; Tel: +886-4-36060666 ext. 2778; Fax: +886-4-25362316; E-Mail: cjjweims34.hinet.net