ognizant Communication Corporation

ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RESEARCH
The International Journal

ABSTRACTS
Volume 33, Numbers 1/2

Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 33, pp. 1-8, 2008
0360-1293/08 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

Acupuncture of Specific Points Influences Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials - A Volunteer Crossover Study

Peggy Lietz, M.D. Candidate
Dept. of Surgery, Military Hospital of Berlin, Germany

Reinhard Schmidt, Ph.D.,
Dept. of Ear Nose Throat Disease, University of Greifswald, Germany

Werner Hosemann, M.D.
Professor & Chair, Dept. of Ear Nose Throat Disease, University of Greifswald, Germany

Dragan Pavlovic, M.D.
Dept. of Anesthesiology, University of Greifswald, Germany

Vasyl Gizhko, B.S.,
Dept. of Anesthesiology, University of Greifswald, Germany

Christian Lehmann, M.D.
Professor, Dept. of Anesthesia, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada

Michael Wendt, M.D.
Professor & Chair, Dept. of Anesthesiology, University of Greifswald, Germany

Taras I. Usichenko, M.D., F.I.C.A.E.
Professor, Dept. of Anesthesiology, University of Greifswald, Germany

Abstract: Specificity of acupoints remains a crucial question in acupuncture research. The aim was to investigate whether acupuncture of specific points influences the Cortical Auditory Evoked Potentials (CAEP). Ten healthy volunteers were enrolled in this study according to inclusion criteria. One of 4 acupoints: TH3, GB43 (both claimed as specific for auditory system by Traditional Chinese Medicine) and non-specific points H7 and ST44, was stimulated during one session. Each volunteer received 4 sessions of acupuncture with an interval of 1 week between the sessions. The latencies and amplitudes of CAEP were registered before and after the acupuncture during each session. The mean peak latencies of P2 component decreased after stimulation of TH3 by 11 ms and GB43 by 14 ms whereas the peak latencies of N2 component increased after stimulation of TH3 by 9 ms and GB43 by 4 ms compared to baseline values (p < 0.05). The stimulation of H7 and ST44 did not produce any changes. These finding confirm the specificity of acupuncture points TH4 and GB43 in relation to auditory system.

Key Words: Acupuncture; Evoked Potentials; Electrophysiology; Cortical Response; Acupuncture Specificity; Randomized Crossover Trial




Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 33, pp. 9-17, 2008
0360-1293/08 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

Effects of Acupuncture Given at the HT7, ST36, ST40 and KI3 Acupoints on Various Parts of the Brains of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

Youlong Zhou, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of the Department of Neurology, Xuan Wu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China.

Jianping Jia, MD, PhD
Director and Professor of the Department of Neurology, Xuan Wu Hospital, Capital Medial University, Beijing, China.

Abstract: In this study, we explore various regions of the brains of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) patients before and after acupuncture treatment of acupoints in the brain in order to determine the effect, if any, of acupuncture on AD. Twenty-six patients with clinically-diagnosed AD underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while undergoing acupuncture at the four acupoints of Shenmen (HT7), Zusanli (ST 36), Fenglong (ST 40) and Taixi (KI 3). fMRI Block design paradigm was chosen by electroacupuncture  interval stimulation, and the data of fMRI were analyzed by Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM 99). The result demonstrated that there were right main hemisphere activations (temporal lobe, such as hippocampal gyrus, insula, and some area of parietal lobe) and left activated regions (temporal lobe, parietal lobule, some regions of cerebellum). The activated regions induced by these acupoints were consistent with impaired areas in brain for AD patients, which were closely correlated with the cognitive function (memory, reason, language, executive, etc.). The present study provided the strong evidence that acupuncture had a potential effect on AD, and in partial revealed the mechanism.

Key Words: Alzheimer's Disease; Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging; Acupuncture; Mechanism.




Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 33, pp. 19-31, 2008
0360-1293/08 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

Electro-Acupuncture Improves Survival and Miagration of Transplanted Neural Stem Cells in Injured Spinal cord in Rats

Ya-Yun Chen, MD. Research Fellow
Division of Neuroscience, Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guanzhou, China.

Wei Zhang, MD. Research Fellow
Division of Neuroscience, Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guanzhou, China.

Yu-Lin Chen, MD. Associate chief physician.
Department of Acupuncture of the 1st Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guanzhou, China

Shui-Jun Chen. Technician
Division of Neuroscience, Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guanzhou, China.

Hongxin Dong, MD., PhD. Assistant Professor.
Department of Psychiatry, Washing University Schoolf o meeicicine, St Louis, Missouri, USA.

Yuan-Shan Zeng, Md., PhD. Professor.
Division of Neuroscience, Department of Histology and Embryology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guanzhou, China.

Abstract: This study investigated whether electro-acupuncture (EA) would improve the survival and migration of neural stem cells (NSCs) transplanted in injured spinal cord as well as the potential mechanisms. T10 spinal cord segments of 50 adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were completely transected, and then NSCs were immediately transplanted into the transected site of the experimental animals, while control animals were sham operated without transplantation. Five days post-operation, electro-acupuncture treatment on GV9 (Zhiyang), GV6 (Jizhong), GV2 (Yaoshu) and GV1 (Changqiang) acupoints was applied for 14 days (EA+NSCs 14d) and 30 days (EA+NSCs 30d). ELISA and immunohistochemical staining were sued to assess the content of neurotrophine-3 (NT-3) and the characteristics of transplanted NSCs. We found that the number of transplanted NSCs the survived in (EA+NSCs 14d group was significantly increased as compared to that of the NSCs 30d group (5825.20 ± 819.01 vs 4781.40 ± 500.49 P<0.05). Immunostaining indicated that some transplanted NSCs developed into microtubule association protein 2 (MAP2) positive cells and many of them developed into glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) positive cells in the NSCs30d group. Further, the migration length of transplanted NSCs towards caudal tissue in the injured site was longer in the EA+NSCs30d group than that in NSCs30d group (5.98 ± 0.79 mm vs 3.96 ± 1.72 mm; P<0.05). Also NT-3 in injured spinal cord tissue was 23% increased in the EA+NSCs14d group. These results suggest that the combination of EA and NSCs improves the survival and migration of NSCs in injured spinal cord in rats.

Key Words: Electro-acupuncture; Neural stem cells; Stem cell transplantation; cell migratory orientation; Nerotrophine-3; Spinal cord injury




Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Res., Int. J., Vol. 33, pp. 33-41, 2008
0360-1293/08 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Communication Corp.
Printed in the USA

Abdominal Acupuncture for Insomnia in Women: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

Xiao-Yun Want, M.D., Professor of Gynecology
Song-Hua Yuan, M.D., Attending in Gynecology
Hong-Yan Yang, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology
Yan-Mei Sun, M.D., Attending in Gynecology
Fang-Ping Cheng, M.D., Resident in Gynecology
Chun-Ling Zhang, M.D., Associate Professor of Gynecology
Xu-Chun Huang, M.D., Resident in Gynecology

Department of Gynecology, Second Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou 510000, P.R. China

Abstract: A randomized single-blind trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of short-term abdominal acupuncture as a novel treatment for insomnia in Chinese women. Forty-four patients between the ages of 22 and 56 were randomly assigned to an acupuncture (n=23) and a medication group (n=21). The acupuncture group received abdominal acupuncture once a day for the first three days and once every three days for the remaining 11 days. In addition, every subject in acupuncture group also received a placebo pill once daily. Abdominal acupuncture was administered according to a standardized protocol involving four master and four adjunctive acupoints: Zhongwan (CV 12), Xiawan (CV 10), Guanyuan (CV 4), and Qihai (CV 6); bilateral Shangqu (KI 17) Huaroumen (ST 24), Xiafengshidian, and Qipang. Subjects in the medication group were treated with sham acupuncture at the same time as the acupuncture group and received estazolam once a day. The outcome measure was the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire (LSEQ), administered before and after the trial. Subjects who received abdominal acupuncture lowered their LSEQ scores by an average of 26.32 points (95% CI: 37.34, 15.30). After controlling for potential confounding factors, the effect of abdominal acupuncture in relieving insomnia was still statistically significant. Results indicated that short-term abdominal acupuncture is more effective than pharmacological treatment for relieving insomnia in adult women and has few adverse effects.

Key Words: Abdominal Acupuncture; Female Insomnia; Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire (LSEQ).