ognizant Communication Corporation

EVENT MANAGEMENT
(Formerly FESTIVAL MANAGEMENT & EVENT TOURISM)

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 7, NUMBER 3

Event Management, Vol. 7, pp. 143-150
1525-9951/02 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2002 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Music Quality, Satisfaction, and Behavioral Intentions Within a Jazz Festival Context

Christer Thrane

Lillehammer College, Norway

With a basis in the marketing literature on the possible links between service quality and its outcomes (e.g., greater revenue, increased market share, etc.), this research focused on the relationships between music quality assessment, satisfaction, and two behavioral intentions within a jazz festival context. A causal analysis revealed that the festival attendees' evaluation of the music quality affected the overall satisfaction with the festival positively, and that overall satisfaction exerted a positive and direct influence on a) intention to revisit the festival and b) intention to recommend it to others. By contrast, the festival attendees' evaluation of the music quality only had a direct effect on the intention to recommend to others. Finally, the study's managerial and research implications are briefly discussed.

Key words: Jazz festival; Music quality; Satisfaction; Behavioral intentions

Address correspondence to Christer Thrane, Associate Professor, Sociology, Faculty of Tourism and Applied Social Science, Gudbrandsdalsv. 350, PO Box 1004, 2601 Lillehammer, Norway. Tel: +47 61 28 82 47; Fax: +47 61 28 81 70; E-mail: Christer.Thrane@hil.no
 




Event Management, Vol. 7, pp. 151-164
1525-9951/02 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2002 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

An Exploration of the Direct Economic Impacts From Business Travelers at World Championships

Harry Arne Solberg,1 Tommy D. Andersson,2 and Simon Shibli3

1Trondheim Business School at Sør Trøndelag University, Jonnsvannsveien 82, N-7004 Trondheim, Norway
2School of Economics at Göteborg University, Box 610; S-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden
3Leisure Industries Research Centre, Sheffield Hallam University, Unit 1, Sheffield Science Park, Howard St, Sheffield S1 2LX, UK

Business travelers visiting events have received limited attention from researchers compared with the attention paid to leisure travelers. In this study, economic impacts from various categories of visitors at various sporting events are compared with a specific focus on differences between business travelers and leisure travelers in terms of numbers and economic impacts. The article is based on empirical data from four different world championships in Nordic Ski, Ice Hockey, Judo, and Indoor Climbing. In terms of numbers, leisure travelers clearly outnumber business travelers whereas in terms of economic impacts business travelers are often equally important. These results indicate that particular efforts to describe business travelers may be needed in economic impact studies.

Key words: Sporting events; Business travel; MICE tourism; Economic impacts; Expenditure pattern

Address correspondence to Harry Arne Holberg, Senior Lecturer, Trondheim Business School at Sør Trøndelag University College, Jonnsvannsveien 82, N-7004 Trondheim, Norway. Tel: +47 73 55 99 72; Fax: +47 73 55 99 51; E-mail: harry.solberg@aoa.hist.no




Event Management, Vol. 7, pp. 165-175
1525-9951/02 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2002 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Attributes for Staging Successful Wine Festivals

Ruth Taylor1 and Tekle Shanka2

1School of Management and 2School of Marketing, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BOX U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia

With the increase in special interest tourism, there is a niche for investigating tourism potential within the rural and urban peripheral zone. Wine-producing regions located in the urban-rural peripheral zone not only provide the spatial context for the development of wine tourism, but with the inclusion of a temporal element, can also provide the context for the staging of wine-related festivals and events. This article provides a unique analysis of the visitor market to a wine festival staged in an urban-rural peripheral zone. It investigates the factors contributing to the successful staging of such an event and demonstrates the importance of both the location factor and facilities factor contributing to the overall success of the event. This research highlights the factor of location and its composite variables as being of primary importance for event managers when staging wine festivals in urban-rural peripheral regions.

Key words: Festival management; Events; Wine tourism; Urban-rural areas

Address correspondence to Ruth Taylor, School of Management, Curtin University of Technology, GPO BOX U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia. Tel: (+61 8) 9266 2287; Fax: (+61 8) 9266 7897; E-mail: taylorr@cbs.curtin.edu.au
 




Event Management, Vol. 7, pp. 177-186
1525-9951/02 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2002 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Out of the Stands and Into the Community: Using Sports Events to Promote a Destination

Lori Pennington-Gray1 and Andrew Holdnak2

1University of Florida, Department of Recreation, Parks and Tourism
2University of Western Illinois, Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism

Sport tourism is a growing segment of the travel market. Recent research has suggested that communities might not always be supportive of sports venues because in many instances the citizens are asked to subsidize these events through public tax dollars. Local tourism providers have suggested that many events can be insular, meaning that the spectator merely comes to attend the event and then leaves, resulting in little net gain for the tourism venues. One solution to this problem is to create a distinctive place for the event through "place marketing." This study identified travel patterns and behaviors of spectators to a drag race held in a medium-sized city in North Central Florida. Though the county offers a variety of activities to its visitors, the majority of spectators participated in only one activity: attending the drag race. Recommendations to increase the number of activities participated in while staying in the county (thereby increasing the economic impact) were suggested.

Key words: Automobile racing; Place marketing; Sport tourism; Bed tax

Address correspondence to Lori Pennington-Gray, Assistant Professor, Center for Tourism Research and Development, Department of Recreation, Parks and Tourism, 325 FLG, PO Box 118209, Gainesville, FL 32611. Tel: (352) 392-4042, ext. 1318; E-mail: penngray@hhp.ufl.edu
 




Event Management, Vol. 7, pp. 187-196
1525-9951/02 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2002 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Taking the Pulse of Olympic Sponsorship

Graham Brown

University of South Australia, School of International Business, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia

This article describes sponsorship activities undertaken in conjunction with the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games. It examines the type of benefits gained by organizations that chose to be associated with the Olympic brand. The first part draws on information provided in interviews with people who used Olympic sponsorship to achieve a diverse range of objectives. They include the Director of Marketing for the Sydney Organising Committee of the Olympic Games (SOCOG) and people responsible for managing the sponsorship programs for some of the major Olympic sponsors. The provision of hospitality for guests is an important leveraging tool used by sponsors and the second part describes the findings of a survey conducted during the Games that was funded by the CRC for Sustainable Tourism. It sought to evaluate the attitudes of sponsor guests towards the Olympics, the hospitality program in which they participated, and towards Sydney, as the host city of the Games.

Key words: Sponsorship; Olympic Games; Sponsorship benefits; Sydney 2000 Olympic Games

Address correspondence to Dr. Graham Brown, Professor of Tourism, University of South Australia, School of International Business, Room WL4-31, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia. Fax: 61 8 8302 0512; E-mail: Graham.Brown@unisa.edu.au
 




Event Management, Vol. 7, pp. 197-204
1525-9951/02 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2002 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

RESEARCH NOTE
A Case Study of Postexposition Site Utilization in Korea

Keun-Soo Park

School of Tourism, Kyungdong University, San 91-1 Bongpo-ri, Tosung-myun, Kosung-geun, Kangwon-do, Korea, 219-832

This article examines the issue of postexposition site utilization in Korea. Two cases are investigated: the Taejon Expo '93 site and the Kangwon International Travel Expo '99 site. Evidence shows that there have been mistakes made regarding the utilization of the Taejon Expo '93 site, and it has been considered a failure. In the case of the Kangwon International Travel Expo '99, three issues are addressed: (a) the suitability of the utilization of the Expo site by Kangwon Province and Sokcho City, (b) appropriate alternatives for utilizing the Expo site among three alternatives, (c) additional alternatives to utilize the Expo facilities and site. It is concluded that Kangwon Province and Sokcho City should play an important role in developing the Chungcho-Ho area to make it much more attractive.

Key words: Exposition; Site utilization; Korea

Address correspondence to Keun-Soo Park, Professor, School of Tourism, Kyungdong University, San 91-1 Bongpo-ri, Tosung-myun, Kosung-geun, Kangwon-do, Korea, 219-832. Tel: 82-33-639-0332; Fax: 82-33-639-0318; E-mail: kspark@kyungdong.ac.kr