ognizant Communication Corporation

FAILURE & LESSONS LEARNED IN INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 1, NUMBER 3, 1997

Failure & Lessons Learned in Information Technology Management, Vol. 1, pp. 167-177, 1997
1088-128X/97 $10.00 + .00
Copyright  © 1997 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Role of Evaluation in Dealing With Information Systems Failure: Conceptual Explorations

Angeliki Poulymenakou1 and Vasilis Serafeimidis2

1Information Systems Department, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE, UK
2Department of Mathematical and Computing Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 5XH, UK

This article examines the potential of information systems evaluation for the analysis and mitigation of information systems failure. The article focuses on the organizational, human, and social dimensions of systems failure and contrasts those to concerns of current evaluation practices. A conceptual framework is provided that elucidates these perspectives. The article concludes by recommending changes to the current perception of information systems evaluation, as an organizational activity, which are required in order to meet the challenges created by systems failure. The conceptual issues and the framework discussed will become a basis for analysis and discussion of empirical research

Key words: Information systems failure; Evaluation; Organizational and social dimensions

Correspondence and requests for reprints should be addressed to Vasilis Serafeimidis. Tel: (44) 1483-259631; Fax: (44) 1483-259385; E-mail: v.serafeimidis@mcs.surrey.ac.uk




Failure & Lessons Learned in Information Technology Management, Vol. 1, pp. 179-183, 1997
1088-128X/97 $10.00 + .00
Copyright  © 1997 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Lessons Learned in Developing and Deploying Expert Scheduling Systems

Jay Liebowitz

Department of Management Science, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052

Expert and intelligent scheduling systems are becoming more prevalent throughout organizations. Many of these systems are being built worldwide for a variety of applications. As organizations continue to develop and deploy these scheduling systems, some valuable lessons can be learned and shared. This article discusses some of these lessons gained as part of a NASA research project.

Key words: Expert systems; Intelligent scheduling; Lessons learned; NASA research

Correspondence and requests for reprints should be addressed to Jay Liebowitz. Tel: (202) 994-0554; Fax: (202) 994-4930; E-mail: jayl@gwis2.circ.gwu.edu




Failure & Lessons Learned in Information Technology Management, Vol. 1, pp. 185-189, 1997
1088-128X/97 $10.00 + .00
Copyright  © 1997 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Leveraging the LAN?: Implications for Distributed System Environments

Felix B. Tan

Department of Management Science and Information Systems, School of Business & Economics, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand

With the rapid expansion in the use and reliance on local area networks (LANs), researchers and organizations are beginning to investigate ways in which investments in LANs can be better capitalized. This article describes the experiences of an organization that took the investment in LAN technology further than the provision of e-mail and office automation by adopting leading edge distributed system application software. One major lesson can be gained form these experiences - organizations must recognize the limits to which the existing LAN platform can be further utilized. There comes a point where such attempts at "leveraging the LAN" can result in tradeoffs with performance and costs.

Key words: Distributed systems; Local area network (LAN); Network performance; Network costs

Correspondence and requests for reprints should be addressed to Felix B. Tan at his current address: Visiting Scholar, Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7. Voice: (519) 679-2111, ext. 5197; E-mail: ftan@ivey.uwo.ca




Failure & Lessons Learned in Information Technology Management, Vol. 1, pp. 191-203, 1997
1088-128X/97 $10.00 + .00
Copyright  © 1997 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Wherefore IT Failures: A Synthesis

Somnath Bhattacharya1 and Warren Wasson2

1College of Business Administration, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968
2Auditor, U.S. Department of Labor

Information Systems/Information Technology (IS/IT) literature is replete with success stories. Although favorable outcomes receive much attention, IS/IT failures are rarely publicized as widely. And yet, lessons gleaned from past IT failures may keep organizations from repeating the same foibles over and over again. This study discusses a broad range of IS/IT failures, and what users and vendors perceive as solutions to IS/IT problems. Failure is defined not only by the metric of technical performance inadequacy, but also by organizations' inability to successfully select needed technology; implement technology; resolve conflicts between various factions and departments; resistance of users in accepting IT products; and failure to accurately project future needs. The technology discussed includes integrated software packages, client-server technology, E-mail and unified directories, operating systems, data base applications, software suites, and the use of systems integrators.

Key words: IT failure; Strategic use of IT; Competitive gains through IT

Correspondence and requests for reprints should be addressed to Dr. S. Bhattacharya, Department of Accounting, College of Business Administration, The University of Texas at El Paso, 400 W. University Drive, El Paso, TX 79968-0542. Tel: (915) 747-7736; Fax: (915) 747-8618; E-mail: sbhatt@mail.utep.edu




Failure & Lessons Learned in Information Technology Management, Vol. 1, pp. 205-215, 1997
1088-128X/97 $10.00 + .00
Copyright  © 1997 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Power and Conflict in Information Systems Strategy: Operationalizing Giddens as Critical Explicator

John Kawalek1 and Ray Hackney2

1Sheffield Business School
2Manchester Metropolitan University

The recent trend towards sociologically oriented research methods for Information Systems and Technology (IS/IT) has brought with it a focus on the work of sociologist Anthony Giddens. It is argued in this article that Giddens has been used somewhat selectively both in current IS/IT research and in the wider management literature. This article takes the central tenet of Agency and suggests that key interpretations of Giddens have used factors that determine action based around internal organizational politics resulting from the imperatives of the market and the goal of profit maximization. It tends to ignore the wider societal influences that can affect the "process" of strategy formulation and implementation. The commonly reported characteristics of so-called "Structuration" theory are recognized within this view. They deny Structuration's own roots as being in an historical consideration of social structures and the associated power relationships that emerge. In applying Structuration in this manner, the article presents a case study within the context of local government in the UK, where recent externally imposed legislation has resulted in significant organizational change. The case demonstrates the instigation of change being enabled by a combination of sociohistorical factors, and the outcome determined by shifting power and conflict maneuvers of key protagonists.

Key words: Information systems strategy; Structuration; Agency; Sociohistorical factors

Correspondence and requests for reprints should be addressed to John Kawalek, Sheffield Business School, Totley Campus, The Old Hall, Totley Hall Lane, Sheffield S17 4AB, UK. Tel: +44 0114 272 0911; Fax: +44 0114 253 2870; E-mail: J.P.Kawalek@shu.ac.uk