ognizant Communication Corporation

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & TOURISM

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 10, NUMBER 1

Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 10, pp. 3-17
1098-3058/08 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Analyzing News Media Coverage to Acquire and Structure Tourism Knowledge

Arno Scharl,1 Astrid Dickinger,1 and Albert Weichselbraun2

1Department of New Media Technology, MODUL University Vienna, Vienna, Austria
2Department of Information Systems and Operations, Vienna University of Economics & Business Administration, Vienna, Austria

Destination image significantly influences a tourist's decision-making process. The impact of news media coverage on destination image has attracted research attention and became particularly evident after catastrophic events such as the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake that triggered a series of lethal tsunamis. Building upon previous research, this article analyzes the prevalence of tourism destinations among 162 international media sites. Term frequency captures the attention a destination receives-from a general and, after contextual filtering, from a tourism perspective. Calculating sentiment estimates positive and negative media influences on destination image at a given point in time. Identifying semantic associations with the names of countries and major cities, the results of co-occurrence analysis reveal the public profiles of destinations, and the impact of current events on media coverage. These results allow national tourism organizations to assess how their destination is covered by news media in general, and in a specific tourism context. To guide analysts and marketers in this assessment, an iterative analysis of semantic associations extracts tourism knowledge automatically, and represents this knowledge as ontological structures.

Key words: Knowledge acquisition; News media; Destination coverage; Sentiment analysis; Tourism ontology

Address correspondence to Arno Scharl, MODUL University Vienna, Department of New Media Technology, Am Kahlenberg 1, 1190 Vienna, Austria. Tel: +43-1-3203555-500; Fax: +43-1-3203555-903; E-mail: scharl@modul.ac.at




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 10, pp. 19-29
1098-3058/08 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Online Auction Markets in Tourism

James K. Ho

Information & Decision Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA

Online auction is one of the few examples of how e-commerce over the Internet can truly transform a business model, rather than simply transplanting it to a different medium. From the selling and buying of personal possessions among private individuals, it has grown to become a major alternative distribution channel for most commercial goods. While the travel and tourism industry may not be a natural fit for this model initially, viable markets are indeed emerging. In this article, actual development is surveyed, and a framework for comparative studies is presented in the context of market conditions for sellers and buyers. In particular, the methodology of maximum resolution dichotomy is introduced to analyze data available under the categories of Vacation Rentals, Hotels and Bed and Breakfast, and Vacation Packages on eBay.com.

Key words: Online auctions; Market research; Lodging; Travel and tourism; Data mining

Address correspondence to James K. Ho, Information & Decision Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago, m/c 294, 601 South Morgan, Chicago, IL 60607, USA. Tel: 312-996-0819; Fax: 312-413-0385; E-mail: jimho@uic.edu




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 10, pp. 31-42
1098-3058/08 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Using Location-Based Tracking Data to Analyze the Movements of City Tourists

Marko Modsching,1 Ronny Kramer,1 Klaus Ten Hagen,1 and Ulrike Gretze1,2

1University of Applied Sciences Zittau-Görlitz, Görlitz, Germany
2Laboratory for Intelligent Systems in Tourism, Texas A&M University, USA

This article presents a methodology to analyze the spatial behavior of tourists based on tracking data. This method was applied during a field study in the city of Görlitz at the east border of Germany. Based on Global Positioning System (GPS) logs the spatial distribution of visitors in various areas is visualized and analyzed. Using the bimodality of the distribution of walking speeds, areas of slowdown are identified and subsequently clustered into activity areas. Using the activity areas, the amount of time tourists allocate to various activity categories is computed. Furthermore, a subsequent analysis of the activity behavior is used to identify the current visiting pattern of tourists and a network analysis of the identified activity areas is used to locate hubs. The network analysis highlights sequences of sights used very often and therefore identifies the beaten paths.

Key words: Spatial behavior; Activity analysis; GPS logging; City tourism; Network analysis

Address correspondence to Klaus ten Hagen, University of Applied Sciences Zittau-Görlitz, Brückenstr. 1, D-02826 Görlitz, Germany. Tel: +49 (3581) 48 28 265; E-mail: K.tenHagen@HS-ZiGr.de




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 10, pp. 43-58
1098-3058/08 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Digital Identity Management and Satisfaction With Virtual Travel Communities

Hua Jiang, Juline E. Mills, and Svetlana Stepchenkova

Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, College of Consumer and Family Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA

Virtual communities are emerging as an effective marketing tool with increasing number of technologies supporting online communications. This study proposed that members' satisfaction with virtual travel communities (VTCs) is positively influenced by their perception of, attitude towards, and trust in digital identity management (DIM) system employed in VTCs and tested the model using SEM analysis. The study found that perceptions of DIM have a positive effect on attitude and trust which, in turn, positively influences satisfaction. The results of the study are useful for travel organizations, as well as technology designers, who are considering using VTCs as one of their online marketing strategies.

Key words: Digital identity; Virtual travel communities; Trust; Satisfaction; Structural equation model

Address correspondence to Svetlana Stepchenkova, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, College of Consumer and Family Sciences, Purdue University, 154 Stone Hall, 700 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2059, USA. Tel: 1-765-413-5337; Fax: 1-765-464-1778; E-mail: svetlana@purdue.edu




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 10, pp. 59-74
1098-3058/08 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Impact of a Marketing Information System: A Case Study of Smart-Baltimore

Tanvi Kothari,1 Zheng Xiang,2 and Daniel R. Fesenmaier2

1Department of General and Strategic Management, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
2School of Merchandising and Hospitality Management, University of North Texas, Denton, TX, USA

The purpose of this study is to use existing theories of technology and organizational change to assess the impact of technology implementation within the context of the tourism industry. The framework is applied as a case study to analyze the perceived implications of implementing a destination marketing information system by the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Bureau. The results of the study indicate that the most important value of the system is the richness and timeliness of information. The key informants perceive that this system will not only impact the marketing activities at the organization but will not influence the overall organizational activities. Finally, this article discusses the importance of these findings for destination marketing.

Key words: Destination marketing organizations; Marketing information systems; Technology impact; Technology evaluation; Organization change

Address correspondence to Tanvi Kothari, M.S., Fox School of Business and Management, Department of General and Strategic Management, Temple University, 1810 North 13th street, 380 Speakman Hall, Philadelphia, PA 19122-6083, USA. Tel: (267)879-4332; E-mail: tanvi@temple.edu




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 10, pp. 75-89
1098-3058/08 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2008 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Effect of Utilitarian and Hedonic Motivations on Consumer Satisfaction With Travel Websites

Khaldoon "Khal" Nusair,1 Hae Jin Yoon,2 and H. G. Parsa1

1Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA
2Hospitality Management, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

Many e-commerce service providers have failed to identify specific dimensions of website quality that result in improved customer satisfaction. In addition, the importance of hedonic and utilitarian functions in improving customer satisfaction is not well understood. Thus, this study has two goals: 1) to investigate the specific website quality dimensions that influence customer satisfaction; 2) to investigate whether two shopping motivation variables, utilitarian and hedonic, moderate the effect of the Web quality dimensions on satisfaction. Results have identified five dimensions of service quality: visual and emotional appeal; information fit; response time; trust; and relative advantage. Furthermore, utilitarian and hedonic shopping motivations have significant moderating effect on customer satisfaction.

Key words: Online satisfaction; Service quality; Travel; Shopping motivations; Hedonic customers; Utilitarian customers

Address correspondence to H.G. Parsa, Ph.D., Chair, Department of Lodging and Foodservice Operations, 231 G Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, 9907 Universal Blvd, Orlando, FL 32819, USA. Tel: (407) 903-8048; Fax: (407) 903-8106; E-mail: hparsa@mail.ucf.edu