ognizant Communication Corporation

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & TOURISM

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 11, NUMBER 1

Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 1-15
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

A Travel Situation Management Ontology

Paul O'Brien

Griffith University Business School, South Bank, Qld, Australia

Highly mobile people (HMP) such as international executives, airline crew, international sportspersons, and independent travelers require flexible, reactive service delivery due to their regularly changing location and activities and the lack of a wired network connection. A mobile service delivery system should be able to detect relevant travel-related events such as change of location, availability of new last-minute specials, sales opportunities, and safety issues and then reactively take action in response to those events. This article describes a generic travel situation management ontology that was developed in the Ontology Language for the World Wide Web (OWL) using the ontology development tool, Protégé. This ontology can be used as the basis for mobile travel service applications.

Key words: Tourism technology; Situation management; Ontologies; Context Awareness; Mobility

Address correspondence to Dr. Paul O'Brien, Griffith University Business School, 226 Grey Street, South Bank, Qld, 4101, Australia. Tel: +61 7 3735 3250; Fax: +61 7 3735 3272; E-mail: p.obrien@griffith.edu.au




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 17-30
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

My Ideal Tourism Destination: Personalized Destination Recommendation System Combining Individual Preferences and GIS Data

Martin Goossen, Henk Meeuwsen, Jappe Franke, and Marjolijn Kuyper

Alterra, Wageningen University and Researchcentre, Wageningen, The Netherlands

Destination recommendation systems are mostly fed with subjective information provided by the tourism industry itself. More objective information about destinations can be provided using a GIS (geographical information system) that includes multiple types of digital topographical data. A Dutch Web site (http://www.myplacetobe.eu) was developed to enable Internet users to locate their own preferred travel destinations according to their landscape preferences. The application draws a personalized map of the Netherlands which indicates where the Dutch landscape corresponds closest to the user's stated desires. The success of the Web site in the Netherlands points to the enormous potential of a similar Web site on a European scale.

Key words: Preferences; Landscape; Tourism; GIS; Destination recommendation system

Address correspondence to Martin Goossen, Alterra, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands. Tel: +31 317 481674; Fax: +31 317 419000; E-mail: Martin.goossen@wur.nl




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 31-42
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Anatomy of a Digital Storytelling System: The Architecture

Bob Van Limburg

Stenden University of Applied Science, Leeuwarden, The Netherlands

This article discusses the structure of a digital storytelling environment. It clarifies what such a system should look like and what prerequisites apply to such an environment. This article also investigates how storytelling helps to improve and deepen the communication of messages.

Key words: Knowledge management; Storytelling; Digital storytelling; ICT; Interactive marketing; Tourism

Address correspondence to Bob van Limburg, Stenden University of Applied Science, PO Box 1298, 8900 CG Leeuwarden, The Netherlands. E-mail: bobvanlimburg@gmail.com; b.van.limburg@chn.nl




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 43-50
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Investigating Task Completion for a Complicated Online Travel Search

Joseph A. Cazier, B. Dawn Medlin, and Antonina V. Durfee

Walker College of Business, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC, USA

In this study we explore how user characteristics such as trust, persistence, and perceptions of the benefits and impediments of online travel shopping influence user likelihood to complete a specific travel shopping task. Through an uncontrolled experiment with a multistep travel search task, we test the difference in user characteristics between those who completed and those who did not. Sixty-four percent did not complete the travel itinerary. The results of analyes using logistic regression indicate that those who trust more were less likely to complete the task, while those with a high perception of the benefits of online shopping were more likely to complete the task. Those with more self-reported persistence were more likley to complete the task.

Key words: Travel; Internet search; Trust; Persistence

Address correspondence to B. Dawn Medlin, Walker College of Business, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608, USA. E-mail: medlinbd@appstate.edu




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 51-66
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Toward Semantic Interoperability in Travel Planning on the Semantic Web: Learning a Reference Ontology From Online Heterogeneous Tourist Attraction Classification Systems

Yuxia Huang

Department of Computing Sciences, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, TX, USA

An ontology-based approach is a promising solution to the problem of semantic interoperability in e-tourism. This article presents a method to build a reference ontology from online heterogeneous tourist attraction classification systems. The method is based on formal concept analysis. The similarity of the derived concepts is examined by looking at their extensional and intensional components. The experiment indicates that the proposed method is effective for the construction of reference ontology in e-tourism.

Key words: Semantic interoperability; Ontology; Formal concept analysis; Concept similarity; e-tourism

Address correspondence to Yuxia Huang, Department of Computing Science, Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, TX 78412, USA. Tel: 1-361-825-2646; Fax: 1-361-825-5848; E-mail: lucy.huang@tamucc.edu




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 67-84
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Hotel-Domain Ontology for a Semantic Hotel Search System

Donghee Yoo, Gunwoo Kim, and Yongmoo Suh

Korea University Business School, Seoul, Korea

Current online hotel booking systems have some problems helping travelers find hotels that meet their interests. In order to overcome these problems we have defined hotel-domain ontology to include three concepts: (1) those associated with hotels themselves and their relationships with neighboring artifacts; (2) those representing components of a hotel to be evaluated and their properties; and (3) those corresponding to subjective, ambiguous terms that are used when searching or evaluating hotels. A Semantic Hotel Search System (SHSS) using currently available semantic Web technologies was developed that enables travelers to find hotels using the system.

Key words: Semantic Web; Ontology; Hotel search

Address correspondence to DongheeYoo, Korea University Business School, Seoul, Korea. Tel: +82 2 3290 1945; Fax: +82 2 922 7220; E-mail: dhyoo@korea.ac.kr