ognizant Communication Corporation

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & TOURISM

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 11, NUMBER 3

Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 183-196
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Ontology-Based Information Extraction From Tourism Websites

Christina Feilmayr, Stefan Parzer, and Birgit Pröll

Institute for Application Oriented Knowledge Processing (FAW), Johannes Kepler University Linz, Linz, Austria

The enlarging amount of semistructured and unstructured data on heterogeneously designed tourism websites creates a need for information extraction (IE) mechanisms for semiautomatic data acquisition in order to build tourism recommender systems or tourism Web portals. In this article we analyze heterogeneity aspects of individually maintained accommodation websites and discuss the applicability of different IE types and techniques for this domain. We then develop a rule/ontology-based IE approach and discuss the components of our prototype crawler. Finally, we discuss some relevant issues that emerged during the development and evaluation of the prototype.

Key words: e-Tourism; Information extraction; GATE (General Architecture for Text Engineering)

Address correspondence to Birgit Pröll, Associate Professor, Institute for Application Oriented Knowledge Processing (FAW), Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz, Austria. Tel: +43 7236 3343 770; Fax: +43 732 2468 9308; E-mail: birgit.proell@faw.jku.at




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 197-209
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Semamo: An Approach to Semantic Market Monitoring

Norbert Walchhofer,1 Karl Anton Fröschl,2 Birgit Dippelreiter,3 Michael Pöttler,3 and Hannes Werthner3

1E-Commerce Competence Center, Vienna, Austria
2Department for Scientific Computing, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria
3Electronic Commerce Group, Institute for Software Technology and Interactive Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria

The aim of the research project SEMAMO (Semantic Market Monitoring) is to make use of the increasingly growing information available at Web-based sales and marketing channels for market research. This is accomplished by using semiautomatic analyses in combination with semantic domain models, where the latter guide the statistical processing flow and the statistical results feed back to the domain model. SEMAMO is based on the assumption that the Web may serve as a "picture" of the reality and that the respective online channels map-in an accurate and timely manner-market developments in terms of product descriptions, distribution, promotions, and price developments. In this article we describe the background as well as the general approach and report on our first results.

Key words: Tourism markets; Information extraction; Market monitoring; Semantic systems

Address correspondence to Michael Pöttler, Electronic Commerce Group, Institute for Software Technology and Interactive Systems, Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstraße 9-11/188, A-1040 Vienna, Austria. Tel: +43 (1) 588 01-18801; Fax: +43 (1) 588 01-18899; E-mail: michael.poettler@ec.tuwien.ac.at




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 211-220
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Usability Differences Between Single-Screen and Multiscreen Booking Interfaces

Srikanth Beldona and Kutay Kalkan

Department of Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management, Alfred Lerner College of Business and Economics, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, USA

The multiscreen booking engine architected around HTML and the traditional Web development model has largely been the norm since the advent of transactional technologies on the Internet. However, with the rapid advancement of Web-based technologies such as Rich Internet Applications, users can now peruse and compare information using intuitive interfaces that are relatively richer in interactivity and responsiveness. This has resulted in the emergence of booking interfaces that enable the booking process to be completed within a single screen or frame. The purpose of this study was to examine usability differences between single-screen and multiscreen booking interfaces within a hotel reservation context. Two intermediary websites (one single screen and the other multiscreen) were taken and evaluated for usability differences. Findings show no differences over operational parameters of usability between the two websites. However, the single-screen interface reported significantly greater evaluations when it came to efficiency, memorability, and error recovery. Lastly, the established multiscreen booking website reported greater satisfaction evaluations over its single-screen counterpart. Findings of the study can be used to improve the quality of interfaces and enhance the research agenda.

Key words: Travel; User interface design; Travel booking; Usability; Rich Internet Applications

Address correspondence to Srikanth Beldona, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Alfred Lerner College of Business and Economics, University of Delaware, 14 W. Main St., Newark, DE 19716, USA. Tel: (302) 831 6192; Fax: (302) 831 6395; E-mail: beldona@udel.edu




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 221-234
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Destinations' Information Competition and Web Reputation

Alessandro Inversini,1 Lorenzo Cantoni,2 and Dimitrios Buhalis3

1Webatelier.net, University of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland
2NewMinE Lab & Webatelier.net, University of Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland
3ICTHR, Bournemouth University, Poole, UK

Destination managers are investing considerable effort (i.e., time, resources, and money) to market their destinations on the Internet. In addition to official destination websites, many unofficial websites are populating the results pages of search engines, diffusing almost the same contents as official destinations websites. The aim of this study is to investigate the information market available to the traveler searching for destination-related information in the so-called online tourism space. Search engines are indexing not only official websites, but also any other websites such as blogs, review websites, wikis, reviews, etc., which are available online. Starting from a log file analysis for a given destination, a set of nine keywords was used to perform search activities on two major search engines (Google and Yahoo!). Search results were first organized and described in order to describe the destinations' information competitors. Second, a content analysis study was performed in order to examine topics and arguments of the retrieved results that are shaping the Web reputation of destinations. The article shows that unofficial sources of information are equally important with respect to officially provided information. Hence, destinations need to manage their brand and online reputation holistically by attempting to coordinate the players offering information about themselves and also amalgamating the entire range of information and service providers on platforms of experience creation.

Key words: Search engines; Internet; Destination marketing; Log file analysis; Reputation analysis

Address correspondence to Alessandro Inversini, Webatelier.net, University of Lugano, Via Buffi 13, 6900 Lugano, Switzerland. Tel: +41.58.666.4649; Fax: +41.58.666.4647; E-mail: alessandro.inversini@lu.unisi.ch




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 235-246
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Member Reputation and Its Influence on Travel Decisions: A Case Study of an Online Travel Community

Irem Arsal,1 Elizabeth D. Baldwin,2 and Shelia J. Backman2

1Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, MODUL University Vienna, Vienna, Austria
2Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism Management, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA

The purpose of this research was to investigate member reputation in an online travel community and its influence on different types of travel decisions. The research design employed a case study approach. In order to examine the influence of member reputation on travel decisions in this community, the members were divided into three groups according to their total number of postings: low-, medium-, and high-activity members. The results showed that medium-activity members were influential in accommodations, food and beverages, safety, money, destination information, and itinerary decisions; low-activity members were influential in food and beverages, transportation, destination information, and itinerary decisions; high-activity members were influential in food and beverages, destination information, and itinerary refinements.

Key words: Online travel community; Member reputation; Travel decision

Address correspondence to Irem Arsal, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, MODUL University Vienna, Am Kahlenberg 1, 1190 Vienna, Austria. Tel: +43 (1) 320 3555-420; Fax: +43 (1) 320 3555-903; E-mail: irem.arsal@modul.ac.at




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 11, pp. 247-264
1098-3058/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tip: Personalizing Information Delivery in a Tourist Information System

Annika Hinze,1 Agnès Voisard,2 and George Buchanan3

1University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand and Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany
2Fraunhofer Institute for Software and Systems Engineering (ISST), Berlin, Germany and Freie Universität, Berlin, Germany
3City University, London, UK

Advanced tourist information systems should offer more than relatively static information about sights and places. Instead, semantically rich information about sights should be delivered to the mobile users. Furthermore, tourists should not be overwhelmed by a stream of superfluous data that are unrelated to their interest, location, and knowledge of a place. Personalization of the information delivery to each traveler, together with their travel history, is therefore crucial. This article presents the major design issues of the personalized Tourist Information Provider (TIP). TIP is a combination of an event-based system (EBS) and a location-based service (LBS) applied to a mobile environment. We discuss the lessons learned from developing its kernel using a semantic network of sight-related information and considering the travelers' interest and travel route, with emphasis on modeling decisions and their impact on the final system.

Key words: Location-based services; User profiles; Semantic modeling

Address correspondence to Annika Hinze, Department of Computer Science, University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand. E-mail: Annika.Hinze@cs.waikato.ac.nz