ognizant Communication Corporation

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & TOURISM

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 4, NUMBER 1

Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 4, pp. 3-14
1098-3058/01 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2001 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.
 

Internet Sales of Travel and Tourism Services in the European Market 1998-2000: A Method of Tracking Trends by Focusing on Major Online Marketers

Carl H. Marcussen

Research Centre of Bornholm, Stenbrudsvej 55, 3730 Nexoe, Denmark

This article analyzes trends in Internet sales of a range of different travel and tourism services in the Western European market from 1998 to 2000. A method of tracking trends by focusing on major online players is developed and applied. The European online travel market increased dramatically from 1998 to 2000. Intermediaries increased their share of online sales during the period. The fastest growing geographic market was the UK, which also became the largest European online travel market in 1999, a position held by Germany back in 1998. Air travel increased its share of online travel sales during the period, mostly driven by the advent of no-frills airlines in the travel market in general (especially in the UK) and their tremendous online sales success.

Key words: Internet; Europe; Travel; Tourism; Trends; Online sales

Address correspondence to Carl H. Marcussen, Senior Researcher, Ph.D., Research Centre of Bornholm, Stenbrudsvej 55, 3730 Nexoe, Denmark. Tel: +56 44 11 44; Fax: +56 49 46 24; E-mail: marcussen@rcb.dk



 
Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 4, pp. 15-30
1098-3058/01 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2001 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.
 
Predicting Usage of the Internet for Travel Bookings: An Exploratory Study

Alastair M. Morrison,1 Su Jing,2 Joseph T. O'Leary,3 and Liping A. Cai1

1Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management and 2Department of Statistics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
3Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX

The marketing of travel on the Internet is growing rapidly and with this so is travel e-commerce. Unfortunately, the research information to date on people searching for travel information online and booking travel through the Internet has lacked depth and sophistication. Therefore, this study developed and tested predictive models for the likelihood of booking travel online and for being a repeat booker of travel online. Using an interactive survey method, the respondents were asked to provide information on their sociodemographic characteristics, travel-related behaviors, Internet usage patterns, perceptions of the Internet, and last trips booked online. Stepwise logistic regression analysis was then applied to develop the two predictive models. A conceptual model was suggested depicting the process through which people become Internet travel bookers.

Key words: Bookers; Lookers; Repeat bookers; Internet marketing; Online travel retailing; World Wide Web

Address correspondence to Prof. Alastair M. Morrison, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Room 156, Stone Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907. Tel: (765) 494-7905; Fax: (765) 494-0327; E-mail: Alastair@cfs.purdue.edu



 
Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 4, pp. 31-39
1098-3058/01 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2001 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.
 
Multimedia Use in the Uk Tourism and Hospitality Sector: Training on Skills and Competencies

Marianna Sigala, David Airey, Peter Jones, and Andrew Lockwood

School of Management Studies for the Service Sector, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK

Despite the wide diffusion of multimedia, little is known about the amount and nature of training provision in these technologies. This study aimed to investigate the training provision of Small and Medium Tourism and Hospitality Enterprises (SMTHEs) in the UK. In particular, three issues were investigated: training provision and content, training methods used and their perceived effectiveness. Only a small percentage of multimedia users were found to provide any training, while training content was focused on operational skills (i.e., how to use/operate multimedia). On-the-job training was heavily used and perceived as effective as other less used training methods. Differences in training patterns between operators are highlighted but, overall, SMTEs should consider more seriously both the methods and content of their training provision in order to fully exploit multimedia.

Key words: Multimedia; Training; Skills; Competencies; Training methods

Address correspondence to Andrew Lockwood, School of Management Studies for the Service Sector, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH, UK. Tel: +44 (0)1483 822463; Fax: +44 (0)1483 876301; E-mail: A.Lockwood@surrey.ac.uk




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 4, pp. 41-64
1098-3058/01 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2001 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.
 
Information Technology in the Hospitality Industry: The Israeli Scene and Beyond

Tsipi Heart, Nava Pliskin, Edna Schechtman, and Arie Reichel

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel

A survey of information technology (IT) in Israeli hotels revealed medium level of IT satisfaction and a lack of an integrated application suite for this industry, similar to the situation globally. This has led the authors to question whether hotels have the IT infrastructure needed for eBusiness and eCommerce. The survey identified two Israeli software vendors that, since 1999, have acted as Application Service Providers (ASP), renting applications to hotels and restaurants. Elsewhere in the world, however, hospitality ASP initiatives have been less developed. Because Israeli IT is relatively advanced, it is proposed that once renting IT is shown to be more affordable and manageable than buying IT, a trend toward ASPs might extend beyond the Israeli hospitality scene and facilitate the robust IT base needed for competing in the global economy.

Key words: Application services provider (ASP); eBusiness; eCommerce; Enterprise resource planning (ERP); Hospitality industry; Information technology (IT)

Address correspondence to Tsipi Heart, Department of Hotel and Tourism and Management, School of Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel. Tel: 972-52-513633, 972-7-6900119; Fax: 972-7-6900580; E-mail: theart@netvision.net.il