ognizant Communication Corporation

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & TOURISM

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 8, NUMBER 2

Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 8, pp. 79-90
1098-3058/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

E-Procurement Diffusion in the Supply Chain of Foodservice Operators: An Exploratory Study in Greece

Marianna Sigala

Business School, University of the Aegean, Michalon 5, Chios, GR 82100, Greece

Despite e-procurement's benefits, most firms are slow in adopting it. As prior studies on e-procurement have primarily focused on investigating its benefits or adoption mainly in manufacturing, research examining the factors influencing the adoption and diffusion of e-procurement by foodservice operators is minimal. This study fills in this gap by reviewing the literature that identifies potential e-procurement adoption factors and then by testing the latter's impact by gathering data from Greek foodservice operators. Findings showed that e-procurement is adopted by few firms, while e-procurement is diffused only in intrafirm (operational) and not interfirm (more strategic) supply chain processes. Lack of e-procurement knowledge, skills, trust, and risk perceptions were found to be the major inhibitors of e-procurement adoption. Implications for foodservice operators, Internet model developers, and e-commerce policy makers are given.

Key words: E-Procurement; Benefits; Adoption; Use; Supply chain; Foodservice operators

Address correspondence to Marianna Sigala, Business School, University of the Aegean, Michalon 5, Chios, GR 82100, Greece. Tel: +30 22710 35160; Fax: +30 2310 801625; E-mail: m.sigala@aegean.gr




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 8, pp. 91-104
1098-3058/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Assessing the Initial Step in the Persuasion Process: Meta Tags on Destination Marketing Websites

Zheng Xiang and Daniel R. Fesenmaier

National Laboratory for Tourism & eCommerce, School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA

META tags can be used as information snippets to provide navigation cues for trip planning on search engines. It is argued that, from a marketing perspective, they are useful means by which destination organizations convey persuasive messages to travelers. This study examines the extent to which "description" META tags are used on websites owned by destination marketing organizations in the Northeastern US. Content analysis of these META tags clearly confirms this argument and identifies the persuasive nature of these messages. Finally, managerial implications and suggestions for future research are discussed.

Key words: META tags; Search engine; Trip planning; Persuasive communications; Destination marketing

Address correspondence to Daniel R. Fesenmaier, National Laboratory for Tourism & eCommerce, School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Temple University, 1700 N. Broad Street Suite 201, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA. Tel: 1-215-204-5612; Fax: 1-215-204-1455; E-mail: drfez@temple.edu




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 8, pp. 105-119
1098-3058/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

An Investigation of Consistent Rates Across Swiss Hotels' Direct Channels

Jamie Murphy,1 Roland Schegg,2 and Min Qiu1

1Business School, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia
2Institute for Economics & Tourism, University of Applied Sciences Valais, 3960 Sierre, Switzerland

This study investigates a growing issue for hotels and consumers: pricing across distribution channels. Research suggests that hotels should drive consumers towards direct channels with lower operating costs and away from intermediaries, yet few studies have investigated pricing practices across the direct communication channels that hotels control. The results of two surveys of over 100 Swiss hotels illustrate pricing inconsistencies in low- and high-season periods across four communication media under the properties' direct control: telephone, email, static website price lists, and reservation request forms on the website. About one out of two hotels offered different rates across these media, despite the requests being on the same date, for the same type room for the same period. Prices via email responses were the lowest in the low-season survey and website prices were lowest in the high-season survey. Across both surveys, prices were lower via online media--email, static website price lists, and reservation request forms--than via the telephone. Hotel category and number of stars showed a positive relationship with consistent pricing in the low season, and a negative relationship in the high season. Finally, price variations of over 200%--for the same room at the same date--across a hotel's direct online and offline channels serve as a wake-up call for hoteliers to review their pricing and procedures for communicating this pricing.

Key words: Pricing; Distribution channels; Swiss hospitality industry; Price dispersion

Address correspondence to Jamie Murphy, Business School, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. Tel: +61 8 6488 1979; Fax: +61 8 6488 1055; E-mail: jmurphy@biz.uwa.edu.au




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 8, pp. 121-136
1098-3058/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Perception of Exploratory Browsing and Trust With Recommender Websites

Ulrike Bauernfeind and Andreas H. Zins

Institute for Tourism and Leisure Studies, University of Economics and Business Administration, Vienna, Austria

In view of information overflow on the web, the use of recommender systems seems to be an appropriate means by which to organize information that targets preferences. The purpose of this article is to present a novel model explaining the satisfaction with recommender websites integrating emerging influential factors such as trust, exploratory browsing, and personal factors. Three recommender systems were tested to support a model applicable for different product categories. All three recommenders suggest that trust plays a particularly strong role in the support of the decision-making and purchasing process. Web operators therefore should focus on their role as a "trusted friend" as opposed to "hierarchical controller" of user behavior.

Key words: Recommender systems; User satisfaction; E-Commerce; Exploratory behavior; Flow

Address correspondence to Andreas H. Zins, Institute for Tourism and Leisure Studies, University of Economics and Business Administration, Augasse 2-6, 1090 Vienna, Austria. Tel: 0043/1/313 36/4473; Fax: 0043/1/317 12 05; E-mail: andreas.zins@wu-wien.ac.at