ognizant Communication Corporation

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & TOURISM

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 9, NUMBER 2

Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 9, pp. 67-78
1098-3058/07 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Technology Acceptance of the Lonely Planet Website: An Exploratory Study

Margaret Meiling Luo,1 William Remus,2 and Pauline J. Sheldon2

1Yuan-Ze University, Chungli, Taoyuan, Taiwan, R.O.C.
2University of Hawai`i at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawai`i, USA 96822

This study aims at examining the reasons that motivate travelers to use online travel websites for travel information search and reservations by adapting technology acceptance model (TAM). In particular it examines the site of an online travel guide (lonelyplanet.com). The results suggest that perceived usefulness determines behavioral intention to use the travel website. Perceived ease of use does not have a direct impact on behavioral intention; however, it influences perceived usefulness and behavioral intention indirectly. This study benefits practitioners in the preimplementation stage to overcome complaints that system characteristics are arbitrary or in the postimplementation stage to determine the kinds of changes that provide the most meaningful impacts.

Key words: Travel website; Travel guide; Travel intermediary; Technology acceptance model (TAM); Internet use; Structural equation modeling; Partial least square

Address correspondence to Margaret Meiling Luo, Yuan-Ze University, 135 Yuan-Tung Road, Chungli, Taoyuan, Taiwan, R.O.C. Tel: +886-3-463-8800, ext. 2632; Fax: +886-3-463-0377; E-mail: luo@saturn.yzu.edu.tw




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 9, pp. 79-97
1098-3058/07 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Rise of the ICT-Dependent Home-Based Travel Agents: Mass Tourism to Mass Travel Entrepreneurship

Jiaolan Bowden

Scottish Centre of Tourism, Aberdeen Business School, The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen, AB10 7QG, UK

This article gives an overview of home-based travel agencies/agents (HBTAs) in conjunction with the theory of home-based businesses and the disintermediation of the travel distribution channel. HBTAs originated in the US two decades ago and have since become the fastest growing segment of the travel distribution sector and one of its highest yielding distribution channels. The article uses a case study approach to illustrate two defining characteristics of the HBTA phenomenon: (1) the interplay of HBTAs with larger players (i.e., host agencies) in the marketplace and (2) the dependence of HBTAs upon information and communication technologies (ICTs). The recognition of the significance of the HBTA segment adds new perspectives to the debate on the disintermediation effect of ICTs on the travel distribution channel.

Key words: Home-based entrepreneurship; Information and communication technologies (ICTs); Home-based travel agencies/agents (HBTAs); Disintermediation; Reintermediation

Address correspondence to Jiaolan Bowden, Research Fellow, Scottish Centre of Tourism, Aberdeen Business School, The Robert Gordon University, Garthdee II, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen, AB10 7QG, UK. Tel: +44 (0)1224 263036; Fax: +44 (0)1224 263038; E-mail: j.y.bowden@rgu.ac.uk OR jiaolanbowen@yahoo.co.uk




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 9, pp. 99-113
1098-3058/07 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Are Travel Websites Meeting the Needs of the Visually Impaired?

Jee-Hee Han1 and Juline Mills2

1Department of Communication, University of Dayton, Dayton, OH, USA
2Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA

Websites designed for sighted online users may not be suitable for the visually impaired (VI). However, research efforts exploring what VI users find problematic on travel websites are limited. This article, therefore, investigates the travel website usability perception of VI users. In order to determine perceptions of travel websites by the VI, four focus group interviews were conducted with members of the National Federation of the Blind, Indiana Chapter. The collected qualitative data were analyzed using the grounded theory technique. The data analysis yielded nine themes that are presented in this article. The findings indicate that unmarked visual elements hinder navigation at travel websites. In addition, hard to complete online forms prevent the VI from fulfilling reservations and purchasing travel products. The study concludes with recommendations on how owners, managers, and technical designers can make travel websites more accessible to the VI.

Key words: Visually impaired; Travel websites; Web design; Nominal group technique; Qualitative data analysis; Grounded theory technique

Address correspondence to Juline E. Mills, Ph.D., Hospitality and Tourism Management Department, Purdue University, 1266 Stone Hall, West Lafayette, IN 47906, USA. Tel: (765) 496-2084; E-mail: millsje@purdue.edu




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 9, pp. 115-131
1098-3058/07 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Planning and Implementing the Websites of Australian SMTEs

Carmine Sellitto and Stephen Burgess

Centre for Hospitality and Tourism Research, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia

This article reports on research that explored the website implementation practices of 42 Australian small to medium size tourism enterprises (SMTEs). The research examined these practices according to a series of functional stages (managing, understanding, planning, building, and improving) as proposed by the Australian government to promote e-business development. The important website implementation practices identified are associated with the initial establishment of the site (building stage), the growing importance of formal planning advice through the increasing use of consultants (understanding stage), and the evaluation of internal business resources needed for website adoption (planning stage). By rating the performance of the SMTEs via the functional stages, the authors suggest that there is room for improvement in a number of areas, especially in relation to the planning and building their websites.

Key words: SMTEs; Website; Planning; Australia; Interviews; Stages of e-business

Address correspondence to Carmine Sellitto, Centre for Hospitality and Tourism Research, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia. E-mail: Carmine.Sellitto@vu.edu.au




Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 9, pp. 133-144
1098-3058/07 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Information Technology Publications in Leading Tourism Journals: A Study of 1985 to 2004

Rosanna Leung1 and Rob Law2

1Timmical Travel Services Ltd, Hong Kong
2School of Hotel & Tourism Management, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

Despite the extensive range of applications and the dependence of the tourism industry on Information Technology (IT), up to the present time the existing tourism literature has only a limited number of published articles, if any, that give an overview of the progress of IT publications over the past two decades. This article reports on a study that analyzed the published IT papers in three leading research journals in tourism, and examined the trend of IT research based on the publications. Excluding book reviews, research notes, reports, commentaries, and case studies, these three journals published a total of 2,135 full-length research papers during the period 1985 to 2004. Among these full-length research papers, only 55 full-length IT-related papers were found. Moreover, IT applications were grouped into six categories. This study revealed that networking was the most widely published category and with the highest growth rate in 1995-2004. Empirical findings are also compared with the publications in the journal \I\Information Technology & Tourism (ITT) and mainstream IT journals. This article contributes to review the progress of IT research that tourism researchers have performed and published over the past two decades in leading tourism journals.

Key words: Leading tourism journals; Information technology; Publications; Content analysis

Address correspondence to Rob Law, School of Hotel & Tourism Management, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong. E-mail: hmroblaw@polyu.edu.hk