ognizant Communication Corporation

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN HOSPITALITY
Formerly The International Journal of Hospitality Information Technology

ABSTRACTS
Volume 4, Number 1

Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 3-13
1545-9535/05 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2005 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Role of Website Quality in Online Hotel Reservations

Miyoung Jeong, Haemoon Oh, and Mary Gregoire

Hotel, Restaurant, and Institution Management, Iowa State University, 1055 LeBaron, Ames, IA, USA

Room reservations via the Internet, and via hotel websites in particular, are rapidly taking over the role of traditional lodging distribution channels such as global distribution systems (GDS) and offline travel agencies. E-commerce strategists have emphasized the need for hotels to have websites that generate bookings and the importance of understanding how a website attracts and encourages online bookings. In this study, the authors propose a research framework to examine the role of website quality in attracting online bookings and empirically test the proposed model with potential lodging customers. Results indicate that two website characteristics--information completeness and ease of use--are important determinants of perceived website quality, which, in turn, influences customers' expectations of the quality, value, and attractiveness of the lodging property featured on the website. Practical implications for lodging operators related to maintaining a high-quality website are discussed and suggestions for future research are presented.

Key words: Website quality; Online reservation; e-Commerce; Booking; Quality; Value

Address correspondence to Miyoung Jeong, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Hotel, Restaurant, and Institution Management, Iowa State University, 1055 LeBaron, Ames, IA 50011-1120, USA. Tel: 515-294-3038; Fax: 515-294-6364; E-mail: mjeong@iastate.edu




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 15-22
1545-9535/05 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2005 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Effect of Information Technology on Performance in Upscale Hotels

Woo Gon Kim,1 Seungwhan Jeong,2 and Sunny Ham3

1School of Hotel and Restaurant Administration, Oklahoma State University, USA
2Department of Tourism Information Science, Ansan College of Technology, Korea
3Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA

Information resources have long played a crucial role in the conduct of successful lodging operations. This study examines the effect of information technology (IT) applications on their performance in lodging operations. The survey was conducted in upscale hotels to identify the relationship between IT usage and the performance of lodging operations. Front-office, back-office, and restaurant and banquet management systems IT applications all had significant effects on the performance of lodging operations; however, guest-related interface applications were not significant. The findings of this study will benefit the lodging industry by providing critical information to management to assist in deciding whether a lodging operation should strategically invest in IT or not and in determining specific areas of focus for IT investment.

Key words: Information technology (IT); Lodging operations; Upscale hotels; IT investment

Address correspondence to Woo Gon Kim, Oklahoma State University, School of Hotel and Restaurant Administration, 210 HESW, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-6173, USA. Tel: (405) 744-8483; Fax: (405) 744-6299; E-mail: kwoo@okstate.edu




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 23-46
1545-9535/05 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2005 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Methods: A Guide to Using the Case Study Method to Explore Hospitality Information Technology Phenomena

Daniel J. Connolly

Information Technology and Electronic Commerce, School of Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management and Department of Information Technology and Electronic Commerce, Daniels College of Business, University of Denver, USA

There is a growing debate regarding the relevance and applicability of scholarly research. This and the fact that studying information technology (IT) in the hospitality industry is a difficult task due to the complexities of the hospitality environment and the number of variables involved (many of which are hidden) suggests that researchers must reconsider what and how they research topics related to hospitality IT. In an immature field, exploratory studies are often necessary to build a foundation for theory development and more complex quantitative studies. The case study is a useful and important qualitative research method to help understand complex phenomena in their natural settings. It can play an influential role in building and advancing the body of knowledge for hospitality IT. It is also useful for studying IT trials, tribulations, and blunders in the industry to learn what works, what doesn't, and why, and for grounding researchers so that they can focus on practicality and application rather than merely theory. This article describes the case study method and defines the necessary rigor when applying this technique to achieve an appropriate balance between the desired relevance sought by industry practitioners and the academic rigor expected with scientific inquiry. This should serve as a practical guide for anyone interested in using the case study technique in his/her research.

Key words: Case study; Hospitality information technology; Qualitative analysis; Research methods

Address correspondence to Daniel J. Connolly, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Information Technology and Electronic Commerce, School of Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management and Department of Information Technology and Electronic Commerce, Daniels College of Business, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208, USA. Tel: (303) 871-4278; Fax: (303) 871-4260; E-mail: connolly@du.edu