ognizant Communication Corporation

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN HOSPITALITY
Formerly The International Journal of Hospitality Information Technology

ABSTRACTS
Volume 4, Numbers 2/3

Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 49-61
1545-9535/05 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Centralized Information Systems in the Lodging Industry: Implications for Knowledge Management

Srikanth Beldona,1 Pearl Brewer,2 and Sheryl F. Kline3

1Department of Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management, University of Delaware, USA
2Department of Hotel Administration, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, USA
3Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Purdue University, USA

The open standards of the Internet have brought about a centralized shift in the way franchisors interact with franchisees. Using centralized systems such as those enabled by Application Service Providers, lodging franchisors can greatly leverage the benefits of centralization that goes beyond the domains of rich transactional processing. The purpose of this study was to examine the forces that will shape the development of centralized information architectures, while simultaneously shedding light on the new knowledge that lodging franchisors can harness and diffuse across the network. The study develops a lodging-based organizational creation framework. Implications for IT managers are discussed.

Key words: Centralized information systems; Application service provisioning; Knowledge management; Organizational learning; Lodging

Address correspondence to Srikanth Beldona, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Hospitality E-Commerce and Marketing, Department of Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management, University of Delaware, 202 Raub Hall, 14 West Main Street, Newark, DE 19716, USA. Tel: 1-302-831-6192; Fax: 1-302-831-6395; E-mail: beldona@udel.edu




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 63-70
1545-9535/05 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Who's Watching You? Data Collection by Hotel Chain Websites

Peter O'connor

Institute de Management Hotelier International, ESSEC Business School, France

The Web provides unprecedented opportunities for website operators to implicitly and explicitly gather highly detailed personal data about site visitors. This study explores the collection of data by the websites of the top 100 hotel brands. Over three quarters explicitly collect personal identifying data by encouraging visitors to register or join loyalty programs. Nearly two thirds also collect data implicitly through the use of cookie technology. Larger, US-based companies serving the upper end of the market are the most likely to collect data about visitors to their website, irrespective of whether this collection is explicit or implicit. Hotel websites showed an awareness of the importance of privacy concerns to consumers, with the majority of those who collected data in some way prominently displaying a privacy statement of some kind on their website.

Key words: Privacy; Hotel industry; Cookies; e-Commerce

Address correspondence to Peter O'Connor. Ph.D., Professor of Information Systems, Institute de Management Hotelier International, ESSEC Business School, Avenue Bernard Hirsch BP105, 95021 Cergy Pontoise, Cedex, France. Tel: 0033134433177; E-mail: oconnor@essec.fr




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 71-82
1545-9535/05 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Business Models for Travel Emediaries: Examining and Applying Theoretical Frameworks

Roberto Daniele and Andrew J. Frew

SITI Research Centre, School of Business and Enterprise, Queen Margaret University College, UK

This article describes a study that has explored the body of literature on eBusiness models and placed this in the context of the development of travel eMediaries (online intermediaries). The work provides an addition to knowledge in the area and lays part of the foundation for in-depth study of business models and business performance in online intermediation in this sector. The article identifies the most significant definitions and categories of eBusiness models and considers their application through selected eMediaries in the American, European, and Asia Pacific markets. Key areas for further research are suggested, including proposed work from the authors on analysis of determinants of competitive advantage for eMediaries and their networks.

Key words: Business model travel agent; Online intermediary; Tourism; Growth strategies; Business models; eMediary; Electronic distribution

Address correspondence to Roberto Daniele, Lecturer, School of Business and Enterprise, Queen Margaret University College, 33 Clerwood Terrace, Corstorphine Campus, Edinburgh EH12 8TS. Tel: +44 131 317 3585; E-mail: rdaniele@qmuc.ac.uk




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 83-92
1545-9535/05 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Productivity Perception in the Swiss Hospitality Industry: Preliminary Findings

Ray F. Iunius, Stefan Fraenkel, and Julien Lacour-Gayet

Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne, Institute of Technology and Enterprise (EHLITE)

This article presents first results of a study exploring the issues related to the perception of labor productivity in deluxe hotels in the French-speaking part of Switzerland. Although the central idea of the study is labor productivity, other related themes will also be addressed, including quality, training, and information technology. The study highlights the fact that the concept of labor productivity is still very vague; the most interesting finding being that, apparently, the more effort put into the understanding of productivity, the more nebulous the concept becomes. As the perceptions are misplaced, action plans may not be effective, and ultimately people begin to lose interest in the enhancement of labor productivity.

Key words: Productivity; Perception; Inputs; Process; Labor; Concepts; Definitions; Methodology; Quality; Training; Profitability; Information technology

Address correspondence to Ray Iunius, Director EHLITE, Le Chalet-a-Gobet, CH-1000 Lausanne 25, Switzerland. Tel: +41 41217851507; E-mail: Ray.Iunius@ehl.ch




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 93-106
1545-9535/05 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Ontology-Based Website Generation and Utilization for Tourism Services

G. Michael Mcgrath and Brooke Abrahams

Centre for Hospitality and Tourism Research, Victoria University, Australia

It seems unlikely that any single one of the many competing tourism data standards will dominate in the near future. Thus, to facilitate tourism data integration, an approach based on mappings to and from a common, abstracted reference model would seem to be required. We report on an accommodation services website generation package called "AcOntoWeb." AcOntoWeb is based on the same technologies that are the foundation of Harmonise but is extended in the sense that the central ontology itself is abstracted. This leads to benefits in the form of reduced development and maintenance costs, less-complex mapping schemes, and the ability to cope more effectively with business environment volatility. AcOntoWeb is currently being evaluated as part of a wider research project, a major focus of which is ICT diffusion among Australian SMTEs. Some important recent research into technology diffusion and change management issues among SMTEs within the Australasian region is summarized.

Key words: SMTEs; Semantic Web; Ontologies; Knowledge representation; Abstraction; Information integration; Technology diffusion

Address correspondence to Professor Michael McGrath, Professor of Information Systems, Centre for Hospitality and Tourism Research, Footscray Park Campus, Victoria University, PO Box 14428, Melbourne City MC 8001, Australia. Tel +61 3 9688 4627; E-mail: Michael.mcgrath@vu.edu.au




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 107-119
1545-9535/05 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Using Best Practices and the Digital Environment to Teach "Computer Applications For Hospitality"

Jim Buergermeister,1 Edward Harris,2 and Charlene Schmidt3

1Department of Hospitality & Tourism, University of Wisconsin-Stout, USA
2Program Director Service Management, University of Wisconsin-Stout, USA
3Department of Food and Nutrition, University of Wisconsin-Stout, USA

This article will introduce the reader to e-learning and how it relates to the Seven Principles of Effective Teaching. A special class project, featuring point-of-sale technology, is used to show how "best teaching practices" improve learning for students in the course "Computer Applications for Hospitality." Students explore the impact of computers and communications on the hospitality industry, describe basic functions found in property and restaurant management systems, and devote a significant amount of time to learning industry-specific applications. In the digital learning environment students have access to Blackboard, a course management tool. Blackboard provides students with a discussion board for asynchronous communication, access to course information, special software, and a variety of Internet resources.

Key words: Course room management systems; Digital environment; Best practices; POS menu design project; Teaching and learning

Address correspondence to Jim Buergermeister, Department of Hospitality & Tourism, University of Wisconsin-Stout, Menomonie, WI, USA. E-mail: buergermeisterj@uwstout.edu