ognizant Communication Corporation

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN HOSPITALITY
Formerly The International Journal of Hospitality Information Technology

ABSTRACTS
Volume 4, Number 4

Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 127-141
1545-9535/07 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Using Simulation to Manage Waiting Time in a Cafeteria

Kate Wonjae Lee1 and Carolyn U. Lambert2

1Hilton New York, 1335 Avenue of Americas, New York, NY 10019, USA
2The Pennsylvania State University, School of Hospitality Management, University Park, PA, USA

This study explored effective waiting time management strategies with simulation and optimization. First, customer responses toward waiting times were collected via survey. Based on these results, waiting time goals were set. Next, a simulation model was developed based on actual time data gathered from the cafeteria. Results from the initial simulation model indicated that additional employees were needed to meet desired waiting times for service stations. When the addition of employees was found insufficient to meet the waiting time goal for the grill station, other waiting time strategies were suggested. If simulation and optimization techniques were used as a decision support system by food service managers, the effectiveness of decision making for waiting time management could be improved. The study suggested effective waiting time management steps.

Key words: Waiting time; Simulation; Food service management; Optimization

Address correspondence to Carolyn Lambert, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Hospitality Management, The Pennsylvania State University, 229 Mateer Building, University Park, PA 16802-1307, USA. Tel: (814) 863-0022; Fax (814) 863-4257; E-mail: cul@psu.edu




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 143-151
1545-9535/07 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Impact of Information Technology Implementation on Service Quality in the Hotel Industry

Woo Gon Kim1 and Sunny Ham2

1School of Hotel and Restaurant Administration, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078, USA
2Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506, USA

Enhancing productivity and improving service quality are the crucial roles of information technology (IT) in the hotel industry. Regardless of an increasing reliance on IT to improve service quality in hotel operations, few studies have been devoted to evaluation of the nature of the change in service quality, specifically whether implementation of IT has, in fact, resulted in any measurable improvement in the quality of services offered. This study investigates the effect of IT on overall service quality in luxury hotels. Using a measurement scale as an assessment instrument to evaluate systematically this impact, the authors examined four distinct categories of IT applications in luxury hotel lodging operations: front office applications; back office applications; restaurant and banquet management systems; and guest-service interface applications. Property management systems, restaurant management systems, and guest-service interface applications are found to have a significant effect on enhancing the overall service quality of luxury hotels. Top executives of hotels should support the adoption of new technology applications to improve guest satisfaction and obtain customer loyalty.

Key words: Service quality; Information technology (IT) implementation; Hotel industry

Address correspondence to Woo Gon Kim, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Hotel and Restaurant Administration, Oklahoma State University, 210 HESW, Stillwater, OK 74078-6173, USA. Tel: (405) 744-8483; Fax: (405) 744-6299; E-mail: woogon@yahoo.com




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 153-159
1545-9535/07 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Technology Crisis Management in Mainland China: A Study of Hotels in Hangzhou

Shelly Lu and Rob Law

School of Hotel & Tourism Management, Hong Kong Polytechnic University Hung Hum, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China

In order to remain competitive, hotels have to apply information technology (IT) to enhance the quality of their services and improve customer satisfaction. The widespread adoption of IT-assisted hotel operations and management, however, also means that hotels are at a higher risk of failure in IT. Such a potential problem is potentially acute in the hotel industry in mainland China (hereafter known as China), an emerging travel destination. This article reports on a study that investigated IT crisis management in four different star-rated hotels in Hangzhou, one of China's most popular tourist destinations. The study found that IT problems could have a long-standing effect on the entire hotel industry. This article should, therefore, be of interest to readers seeking a better understanding of technology crisis management in China's hotel industry.

Key words: Hotel; China; Information technology; Crisis management

Address correspondence to Rob Law, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Hotel and Tourism Management, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hum Kum, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China. Tel: (852) 2766 6349; Fax: (852) 2362 9362; E-mail: hmroblaw@polu.edu.hk




Information Technology in Hospitality, Vol. 4, pp. 161-178
1545-9535/07 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2007 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Identification of ICT Gaps and Needs Within the Australian Tourism Industry

G. Michael McGrath

Centre for Hospitality and Tourism Research (CHTR), Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia

An analysis of information and information systems gaps and needs within the Australian tourism industry is presented. The indications are that industry stakeholder needs are now covered considerably more effectively than was the case 5 years previously. In particular, many more small-to-medium tourism enterprises (SMTEs) now seem to be online (especially in the accommodation sector). However, much online data would appear to be of poor quality and outdated. Arising from this study, projects aimed at addressing these deficiencies are identified.

Key words: Australian tourism industry; Tourism information systems; Gaps and needs

Address correspondence to G. Michael McGrath, Ph.D., Professor, Centre for Hospitality and Tourism Research (CHTR), Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia. E-mail: michael.mcgrath@vu.edu.au