ognizant Communication Corporation

TOURISM ANALYSIS

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 11, NUMBER 1

Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 1-11
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Reading Tourism Texts in Context: A Critical Discourse Analysis

William Feighery

Center for Recreation and Tourism Research, Peking University, Beijing 100871, P. R. China

This article discusses the method of Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA) employed in a study focusing on the textual representation of ethnocultural diversity by official tourism organizations (OTOs) in England. The underlying principles of CDA are outlined, as well as the specific approach adopted in the study. The study employed a three-dimensional approach to CDA, which included an analysis of written and spoken language as text, as discourse practice, and as social practice. By way of an example, a critical reading of a promotional text is provided that focuses on the dimension of discourse practice. This critical reading outlines some of the strategies writers use to naturalize discourses in tourism promotion: that is, to make discourses appear to be common sense and apolitical. Subsequently, the article comments on the problems and possibilities for the deployment of CDA approaches to analysis within the prevailing system of research governance in the UK and elsewhere. It is argued that although the criteria of relevance and applicability, so often appended to research outputs, may collide with critical interpretative approaches, CDA does have the potential to contribute to our understanding of tourism, and its meta-narratives.

Key words: Critical discourse analysis; Diversity; Ethnic; Texts

Address correspondence to William Feighery, Center for Recreation and Tourism Research, Peking University, Room 3363, 2nd Yifu Bldg., Beijing 100871, P.R. China. Tel: (8610) 62757971; E-mail: wfeighery@beltourism.com




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 13-23
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Perspectives on Inter-Korean Cooperation in Tourism

Samuel Seongseop Kim,1 Heeseung Lee,1 and Dallen J. Timothy2

1Department of Hospitality & Tourism Management, Sejong University, Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul, Korea, 143-747
2School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4703, USA

Tourism is often called the world's peace industry and a pivotal contributor in establishing good relations between host country and country of origin. In particular, cross-border cooperation is a critical factor of success in developing various forms of tourism, especially in areas adjacent to international borders. Between countries partitioned for various reasons, what is the role of cooperation in tourism? This study discusses current efforts of inter-Korean cooperation through tourism and various events and suggests strategies to promote more cooperation. While these recommendations would be the ideal, there are significant constraints to cross-border cooperation on the Korean peninsula. These are considered at the end of the article.

Key words: Peace; South Korea; North Korea; Unification; Cooperation

Address correspondence to Dallen J. Timothy, Associate Professor, School of Community Resources and Development, PO Box 874703, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4703, USA. E-mail: dtimothy@asu.edu




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 25-32
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Determinants of US Wildlife-Watching Consumption: A Tobit Analysis*

Yeong Nain Chi1 and Guang-Hwa Andy Chang2

1Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Socioeconomic Research and Development Section, Baton Rouge, LA 70898-9000, USA
2Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555, USA

This study utilized microdata extracted from the 2001 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation to analyze individual consumption behavior associated with wildlife watching in the US. In the process of selecting an appropriate model consistent with individual consumption behavior associated with wildlife watching, the Tobit model for a primary nonresidential expenditure analysis was evaluated. Empirical results of this study indicated that income, age, gender, education level, fishing or hunting, use of private or public lands, wildlife category (birds or mammals) and ecosystem category (oceans, lakes, marshes, forestlands, brushes, and open fields) had significant effects on nonresidential wildlife-watching expenditures. The results in this study provide insight into determinants of nonresidential wildlife-watching expenditures, which can be used for planning and management purposes regarding wildlife resources and habitats.

Key words: Wildlife watching; Expenditure analysis; Tobit model; Biodiversity

Address correspondence to Yeong Nain Chi, Economist, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Socioeconomic Research and Development Section, P.O. Box 98000, Baton Rouge, LA 70898-9000, USA. Tel: (225) 763-3562; Fax: (225) 763-5405; E-mail: ychi@wlf.louisisana.gov

*This paper was presented at the 26th Annual Southeastern Recreation Research Conference, Charleston, SC, February 8\n\10, 2004.




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 33-44
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Import Content of Tourism: Explaining Differences Among Island States

Diaram H. Ramjee Singh

Department of Management Studies, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica

Although the import content of the tourism industry among small island states is considered to be high, there are wide disparities in the leakage rates among island destinations. This article seeks to test several hypotheses about factors that are likely to explain the differences in the import content of the industry among 19 destinations. The study found that the most important factors are country size and domestic agriculture. Interestingly, and contrary to expectation, tourist per capita housed at a destination and infrastructure development seemed to have little impact on the import content of the industry.

Key words: Caribbean; Import content; Leakage rates; Economic benefits; Regression analysis

Address correspondence to Diaram H. Ramjee Singh, Department of Management Studies, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston 7, Jamaica. Tel: (876) 977-3775, 977-3808; Fax: (876) 977-3829; E-mail: diaram.ramjeesingh@uwimona.edu.jm




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 45-59
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Postpurchase Behavior: A Case Study Into a Vacation Club Product

Randall S. Upchurch and Paul Rompf

University of Central Florida, Rosen College of Hospitality Management, Orlando, FL 32819-1450, USA

Currently, the vacation ownership industry, alias timeshare, is experiencing double-digit growth, which is a trend that has continued for the past 30 years within the US. During this period the timeshare product has evolved from a fixed week system to a more robust vacation club product where the consumer can purchase products or services based on a point allocation system, therefore giving the consumer more flexibility in how the product is utilized. This article evaluates the linkages between product and services offerings in relation to consumer expectancies and satisfaction with intent to purchase additional timeshare products and services. The findings of this study support the general notion that timeshare developer services are integrally related to consumer satisfaction, and in turn influence future decisions to maintain usage patterns or to purchase additional vacation time.

Key words: Product/service quality; Member satisfaction; Vacation club owners; Postpurchase behavior

Address correspondence to Randall S. Upchurch, Professor, ARDA Professorship of Resort Development, Graduate Program Director-M.S. in Hospitality and Tourism Management, Department Chair-Hospitality Operations, University of Central Florida, Rosen College of Hospitality Management, 9907 Universal Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32819-1450, USA. Tel: (407)-903-8048; Fax: (407) 903 8105; E-mail: rupchurc@mail.ucf.edu




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 61-69
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

RESEARCH NOTE
Destination Image and Visit Intention Among Members of Yahoo!-Taiwan's Travel Communities: An Online Survey Approach

Yueh-Hsiu Lin,1 Chin-Yuan Wu,1 and Janet Chang2

1The Institute of Tourism & Recreation Management, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan
2Department and Graduate School of Tourism Management, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan

Prior research has long indicted a distinct relationship between tourists' purchasing behaviors and their perceptions of the target destination. While investigations of this phenomenon have gained popularity in the increasingly competitive global marketplace, research of this nature is still new to developing tourism locations such as Taiwan. The present study addresses this gap by using online surveys to explore the destination images and visit intentions of members of Yahoo!-Taiwan's travel communities regarding Hualien, a pristine county located on Taiwan's relatively isolated east coast. A total of 1011 respondents completed the online survey and 993 usable questionnaires were collected. In total, 25 image attributes of Hualien were identified and analyzed into four factors. Regression analysis identified four attributes that contribute to a positive influence and one negative attribute that has a strong influence on future visit intentions. The study concludes with a discussion of the research limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for promotion of peripheral tourism areas such as the one described.

Key words: Destination image; Travel intention; Online survey

Address correspondence to Yueh-Hsiu Lin, No. 1, Sec. 2, Da-Hsueh Rd., Shou-Feng, 974 Hualien, Taiwan, R.O.C. Tel: 886-3-8633297; Fax: 886-3-8633290; E-mail: plin@mail.ndhu.edu.tw




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 71-74
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

RESEARCH NOTE
State Park Names: Implications for Tourism Marketing

Mark Morgan

Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211, USA

A random selection of state park names were classified by their origins: from nature, culture, or people. The purpose of this study was to determine if park names were consistent with some of the attractions sought by tourists. Although it may seem trivial, names can be powerful links between people and places. Names can heighten visitor expectations, increase subjects' willingness to pay, or result in nonattendance if perceived needs are not met. Many people rely on cues to make decisions about recreation opportunities, instead of using information-based strategies. Names are dominant cues. Nearly 75% of the state park names contained a natural and/or cultural feature (although some of these included people). Only 4% of the parks were named after a person or group having no connection to the site. Overall, the findings were consistent with the literature. Park names were discussed in relation to marketing, visitor behavior, and place attachment, with implications for recreation policy.

Key words: State parks; Names; Marketing; Outdoor recreation policy; Place attachment

Address correspondence to Dr. Mark Morgan, Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism, 105 Natural Resources Building, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211, USA. Tel: (573) 882-9525; Fax: (573) 882-9526; E-mail: markmorgan@missouri.edu