ognizant Communication Corporation

TOURISM ANALYSIS

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 11, NUMBER 5

Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 289-296
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Hedonic Repeat Visit: Exploring Consumption Differences Among First-Time and Repeat Japanese Visitors in Hawaii

Mark S. Rosenbaum

Northern Illinois University, College of Business Administration, Department of Marketing, DeKalb, IL 60115-8397

This article investigates product and service consumption between first-time and repeat Japanese visitors in Hawaii. Overall, the empirical results reveal that repeat visitors to Waikiki are likely to be Japanese females, in their mid-thirties, who relish in fun, self-indulgent, overall hedonic consumption, during their stay. Unlike first-time visitors, who take sightseeing tours and who express interest in purchasing products reminiscent of the local culture, repeat visitors are likely to engage in shopping, golfing, and in patronizing spas during their Hawaiian vacation.

Key words: Tourism shopping; Japanese tourism; Repeat visitors; Hedonic consumption; Hawaii

Address correspondence to Mark S. Rosenbaum, Assistant Professor, Northern Illinois University, College of Business Administration, Department of Marketing, DeKalb, IL 60115-8397. Tel: 815-753-7931; Fax: 815-753-6014; E-mail: mrosenbaum@niu.edu




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 297-310
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Visit Impact on Destination Image

Asli D. A. Tasci

Mugla University, Mugla, Turkey

Various factors influence destination image such as information sourcing from diverse channels as well as perceiver characteristics including sociodemographic characteristics and past travel behavior. Past travel behavior and its influence on destination image receive much attention from destination image researchers; however, these researchers do not discuss the reasons of visitation's influence on destination image. Using a large and longitudinal data set from the Michigan Regional Travel Market Survey, this study reassesses the influence of visitation on destination image and provides a dialectic discussion of the potential reasons for this influence reflecting on various theories from related fields of study. This article includes implications and future research suggestions.

Keywords: Destination image; Visitation influence; Image change; Image improvement; Image formation

Address correspondence to Asli D. A. Tasci, the School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Mugla University, 48170 Mugla, Turkey. E-mail: adatasci@yahoo.com




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 311-318
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

How Self-Image Congruence Impacts Customer Satisfaction in Hotels

Hugh Wilkins, Bill Merrilees, and Carmel Herington

Griffith University, Queensland, Australia

The importance of self-image congruence for product selection has been established across a number of purchase contexts, but the research that has included postpurchase evaluations is limited to a few examples, including a tourist destination, jewelery, and the use of ATMs. Despite recognition of the role of self-image congruence for hotel consumption, no research has been identified that addresses the affect self-image congruence has on postpurchase evaluations. This article reports an empirical analysis of the importance of self-image congruence to the postpurchase evaluation of hotels. The results indicate that self-image congruence affects the level of customer satisfaction. The results also indicate that the impact of self-image congruence varies with purpose of trip and gender.

Key words: Hotel industry; Customer satisfaction; Self-image congruence

Address correspondence to Hugh Wilkins, Griffith University, Department of Tourism, Leisure, Hotel & Sport Management, PMB 50 GCMC, Queensland 9726, Australia. Tel: (7) 5552 8011; Fax: (7) 5552 8507; E-mail: h.wilkins@griffith.edu.au




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 319-330
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Multidimensional Timing Decisions: A Case Study in Tourism Behavior Analysis

Junyi Zhang, Akimasa Fujiwara, and Junichi Sawara

Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8529, Japan

Tourism behavior decisions usually involve some interrelated choices among activities/trips over time. In this study, we developed a multidimensional timing decision model under the principle of random utility maximization. The derived model not only allows for the temporally varying utility of timing decision, but also incorporates sequential correlation between the neighboring timings. The model can also endogenously specify the sequences of activities/trips as well as heterogeneous preferences about the timing. Using a data collected from 1-day car tourists at a tourism region nearby the Sea of Japan, we empirically confirmed the effectiveness of the derived model in representing the complex decision-making mechanisms of tourism behavior.

Key words: Tourism behavior; Multidimensional timing decisions; Utility

Address correspondence to Junyi Zhang, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University, 1-5-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, 739-8529, Japan. E-mail: zjy@hiroshima-u.ac.jp




Tourism Analysis, Vol. 11, pp. 331-
1083-5423/06 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2006 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

RESEARCH NOTE
Sins of the Fathers: The Holocaust and the Leisure Travel Decision Among American Jews

Jeffrey Steven Podoshen

Department of Business, Organizations and Society, Franklin and Marshall College, Lancaster, PA

Understanding the ethnicity and how it affects the tourism decision process is important for a better understanding of key demographic segments of travelers. This research explores the effects of past ethnic conflict on the tourism decision process for leisure travel. Specifically, this study looks at the Holocaust and the propensity for Americans of Jewish descent to choose Germany as a leisure destination. Evidence appeared to indicate that those travelers who had family members involved in the Holocaust were less likely to travel to Germany on leisure than those who did not, but that American Jews in general were no less likely to travel to Germany on leisure than non-Jews.

Key words: War and tourism; German tourism; Equity theory; Jewish

Address correspondence to Jeffrey Steven Podoshen, Department of Business, Organizations and Society, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604, USA. Tel: (856) 986-6295; E-mail: jpodoshe@fandm.edu