ognizant Communication Corporation

TOURISM CULTURE & COMMUNICATION

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 2, NUMBER 1, 2000

Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 2, pp. 1-11, 2000
1098-304X/00 $10.00 + .00
Copyright © 2000 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Organizational Culture and Human Resource Management in an Indonesian Resort Hotel

Larry Dwyer,1 Gregory Teal,1 Sharon Kemp,1 and Chay Yue Wah2

1University of Western Sydney, Macarthur
2National University of Singapore

Organizational culture is an important influence on strategy and performance of tourism and hospitality organizations. After defining organizational culture and highlighting its main elements, this article identifies 10 key characteristics along which cultures differ. It then proceeds to discuss the extent to which a resort hotel on Bintan Island, Indonesia has each of these characteristics and the likely impacts on employee performance. It is concluded that the presence of these characteristics is important, not only for the socialization of employees but for their strategic links with employee performance in the development of a coherent organization.

Key Words: Organizational culture; Strategic management; Resort hotel; Indonesia

Address correspondence to Larry Dwyer, Head, Centre for Tourism and Hospitality Research, University of Western Sydney, Marcarthur, Australia. Tel: (02) 46 203248; Fax: (02) 46 266683; E-mail: l.dwyer@uws.edu.au




Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 2, pp. 13-28, 2000
1098-304X/00 $10.00 + .00
Copyright © 2000 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Australian Tourist Commission's Early Years Viewed by Former Senior Managers

Nina Mistilis1 and Neil Leiper2

1Faculty of Business, University of Western Sydney
2Centre for Tourism, Southern Cross University

The Australian Tourist Commission (ATC), formed in 1967, grew into a large and influential promotional agency and by 1995 was recognized as the national tourism agency receiving the largest amount of funding in the world. However, little documentary data exist about the early ATC years. This research project was undertaken to obtain some information about, and to protect against loss of history in, the early years of the ATC. It also aims to identify and explore the senior management view of policy issues in the early ATC and to identify and to contrast their view of the early ATC with their perception of government expectations for the organization. The policy issues identified are the emerging period of the ATC, threats to its existence, problems with its structure, other specific concerns, and its achievements in the early years until 1975. An oral history approach, based around in-depth interviews with some early senior managers, was used to identify the challenges faced in the interval leading up to the ATC's establishment and through its first decade of operations.

Key Words: National tourism policy; National tourism development; Tourism history; Oral history

Address correspondence to Nina Mistilis, Faculty of Business, University of Western Sydney, Macarthur, PO Box 555, Campbelltown, NSW, Australia 2560. Fax: +61-2-4626 6683; E-mail: n.mistilis@uws.edu.au




Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 2, pp. 29-37, 2000
1098-304X/00 $10.00 + .00
Copyright © 2000 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

"We Are What We Eat": Food, Tourism, and Globalization

C. Michael Hall and Richard Mitchell

Centre for Tourism, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Food relates to issues of identity, culture, production, consumption, and, increasingly, issues of sustainability. Food is also a major component of the tourism product. However, the rich relationship between food and tourism has only recently begun to be identified. This article provides an examination of the role of cuisine as a factor in globalization and localization and provides a framework for examining cuisine change. It argues that tourism is part of a third wave of cuisine change that has substantial implications for tradition, identity, and differentiation of places and products in the marketplace, and concludes that the complexity of the relationship between food and tourism needs fuller examination than what has hitherto been the case.

Key Words: Globalization; Cuisine; Traditions; Identity

Address correspondence to C. Michael Hall, Centre for Tourism, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand. Fax: (64) 3 479 9034; E-mail: cmhall@commerce.otago.ac.nz




Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 2, pp. 39-48, 2000
1098-304X/00 $10.00 + .00
Copyright © 2000 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Why Tourists Buy Textile Souvenirs: European Evidence

Leontine Onderwater, Greg Richards, and Suzanne Stam

Department of Leisure Studies, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands

Souvenir purchasing is an important element of tourism consumption, affecting the tourism experience of the visitors themselves and the economic impact that they have upon the destination. To date, however, limited research has been conducted about tourist souvenir purchase behavior, and the motivations that drive tourists to purchase particular souvenirs. Most previous research has been conducted in the US, where studies have demonstrated the importance of authenticity as a crucial factor in determining product choice. This article presents evidence from surveys of and interviews with European tourists and examines the determinants of crafts souvenir purchasing behavior in general, and the purchasing of textiles in particular.

Key Words: Souvenirs; Purchasing behavior; Textile souvenirs

Address correspondence to Greg Richards, Department of Leisure Studies, Tilburg University, PO Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands. Fax: (31) 13 466 2370; E-mail: richards@kub.nl