ognizant Communication Corporation

TOURISM, CULTURE & COMMUNICATION

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 3, NUMBER 2

Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 3, pp. 61-69
1098-304X/01 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2001 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Australian and Croatian Youth Travel Markets: Are They Different?

Yvette Reisinger,1 Felix Mavondo,2 and Sanda Weber3

1Department of Management and 2Department of Marketing, Faculty of Business and Economics, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
3Institute for Tourism, Vrhovec 5, Zagreb, Croatia

The purpose of this study is to assess whether there are differences in the psychographic makeup of the international youth travel market. First, the article examines the relationships between major psychographic factors such as lifestyle, preferences for activities, travel motivation, personality, and cultural values. A path model is developed, separately for two youth travel markets: Australian and Croatian. Second, the equivalence of the model structure is tested. Finally, comparisons are made to test whether the regression coefficients are invariant across the two groups. The results suggest that the model is conceptually equivalent in Australia and Croatia. However, the regression parameters are significantly different. The article concludes by discussing implications for future studies.

Key words: Youth travel; Student market; Australia; Croatia; Path analysis

Address correspondence to Yvette Reisinger, Department of Management, Faculty of Business and Economics, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia 3806. Tel: 613 9904 7078; Fax: 613 9904 7100; E-mail: Yvette.Reisinger@buseco.monash.edu.au




Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 3, pp. 71-80
1098-304X/01 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2001 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Presentations of the Orient: Singapore and UK Tour Operator Brochures Compared

Joan Henderson

The Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Promotional literature in general and tour operator brochures in particular are often criticized for the misleading way in which they portray destinations. Representations of the Far East by the West are seen as especially false and inaccurate, employing stereotypical and patronizing images and using the language of social control and imperialism. This study assesses these arguments within the context of the presentation of the Oriental destination of China by tour operators from Singapore and the UK, and explores similarities and differences in approach. While the preliminary nature of the research is emphasized, results suggest that there are few significant contrasts between the sets of brochures. Exaggerated language is used to describe the sights to be seen on touring itineraries and some of the pictorial views are romanticized in both cases, but reference is made to more modern environments and lifestyles and there is no conclusive evidence that a process of Western domination is at work. However, further examination is required of the psychological, sociological, and political dimensions of the tour operator brochure in order to fully appreciate its role and cross-cultural differences.

Key words: Tourism brochures; Destination portrayal; Far East perspective; Western perspective

Address correspondence to Joan Henderson, The Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Tel: 65 790 6116; Fax: 65 791 3697; E-mail: ahenderson@ntu.edu.sg




Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 3, pp. 81-91
1098-304X/01 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2001 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Mainland Chinese Pleasure Travelers to Australia: A Leisure Behavior Analysis

Xin Yu and Betty Weiler

Department of Management/Tourism, Faculty of Business and Economics, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

This article reports on an investigation of the leisure travel behavior of Chinese pleasure travelers to Australia. The study was designed to develop a sociodemographic profile of inbound Chinese pleasure travelers to Australia, identify the travel characteristics, lifestyles, and travel benefits sought when choosing Australia as a destination, and assess the perceived importance of, satisfaction with, and actual participation in leisure activities by these travelers. By using multiple variables, the article provides insights into the Chinese inbound travel market and, in particular, the leisure behavior of Chinese pleasure travelers. The results of the study also provide relevant information on the development of tourist products and tour planning. Other useful findings about current tour-based Chinese visitors are reported, which can complement more traditional origin-based market research.

Key words: Australia; Chinese pleasure travelers; Leisure behavior; Package tours; Tourist satisfaction

Address correspondence to Betty Weiler, Department of Management/Tourism, Faculty of Business and Economics, Monash University, Berwick Campus, PO Box 1071, Narre Warren, Victoria 3805 Australia. Tel: 613 9904 7104; Fax: 613 9904 7130; E-mail: betty.weiler@buseco.monash.edu.au




Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 3, pp. 93-99
1098-304X/01 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2001 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourist Gaze: Universal Concept

Young-Sook Lee

School of Tourism and Hotel Management, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia

Recent sociological theories have suggested that as posttourism emerges, the "tourist gaze," the systematic ways in which tourists are seeing, experiencing, and consuming signs, symbols, and places when they are traveling, has increasingly been universalized. This article, based on in-depth interviews with tourists from South Korea traveling to Queensland in Australia and content analysis of tourist brochures and guidebooks produced for the tourists, proposes that their gaze is far from being homogenized. The South Korean tourists' preferences for the "ultra modern," rather than nostalgia and romanticism in nature, are illustrative of the Eurocentrism in existing tourism theories.

Key words: Tourist gaze; Universal concept; Eurocentrism; South Korea

Address correspondence to Young-Sook Lee, School of Tourism and Hotel Management, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland, Australia. Tel: 617 555 28142; Fax: 617 555 28507; E-mail: young-sook.lee@mailbox.gu.edu.au