ognizant Communication Corporation

TOURISM REVIEW INTERNATIONAL
An Interdisciplinary Journal

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 13, NUMBER 2

Tourism Review International, Volume 13, pp. 85-92
1544-2721/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

From Backlot to Runaway Production: Exploring Location and Authenticity in Film-Induced Tourism

Warwick Frost

Tourism Research Unit, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia

Films may represent one place but be made at another. In the early years of filmmaking, quite elaborate sets were constructed on studio backlots. In recent years, runaway productions have represented the United States while being shot in other countries. The dissonance between film setting and film location raises the question of which is more likely to attract tourists. It also suggests that tourists may have difficulties with authenticity. This article seeks to examine these issues by taking a historical approach to the changing ways in which location has been used by filmmakers over time.

Key words: Film-induced tourism; Authenticity; Location; Heritage; Runaway productions

Address correspondence to Warwick Frost, Tourism Research Unit, Monash University, PO Box 1071, Narre Warren 3805, Australia. Tel.: +61 3 9904 7042; Fax: +61 3 9904 7130; Email: warwick.frost@buseco.monash.edu.au




Tourism Review International, Volume 13, pp. 93-101
1544-2721/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Film-Induced Tourism: An Incidental Experience

Niki Macionis1 and Beverley Sparks2

1School of Business, James Cook University, Brisbane, Australia
2Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia

This research was conducted to discover how film viewing might be related to tourism activities and whether motivations drive people to become film-specific tourists or whether visitation to film locations is simply an incidental tourism experience. A survey collected data relating to film tourism motivation, film viewing behavior, general travel behavior, and demographic profiles. Factor analysis was applied to reduce 29 statements into themes of motivations that were labeled Novelty, Prestige, and Personalization. Logistic regression was used to predict likely future film tourist behavior.

Key words: Motivation; Film tourist behavior; Film tourist experience

Address correspondence to Niki Macionis, Tourism Lecturer, School of Business, James Cook University, Brisbane QLD, Australia. Tel: +61 7 3001 7800; Fax: +61 7 3001 7899; E-mail: nicole.macionis@jcu.edu




Tourism Review International, Volume 13, pp. 103-111
1544-2721/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Films and Tourism: Understanding the Nature and Intensity of Their Cause-Effect Relationship

Francesco Di Cesare,1,3 Luca D'angelo,2 and Gloria Rech3

1Tourism Marketing, Ca'Foscari University, Venezia, Italy
2Trento School of Management, Trento, Italy
3Riposte Turismo s.r.l., Venezia, Italy

The present article is part of a wider research project focused on the synergy and all possible connections between film productions and territories. In particular, it deals with the influence of films on tourism motivations as well as their impact on destination images and their role in affecting tourist purchasing behavior. Two different research methods were adopted: a Web survey and an on-site interview conducted in two Italian regions. The results reveal that the cause-effect relationship between film viewing and travel experiences shows varying intensity degrees along the subsequent phases into which choosing and purchasing process tourism products can be divided. More precisely, the influence of film viewing on travel choices gradually weakens as such processes go on, showing decreasing percentages from the first phase (desire to visit a destination brought about by films) to the following ones up to the final purchasing act.

Key words: Film and tourism connections; Travel motivation; Influence of films; Choosing and purchasing process

Address correspondence to Gloria Rech, Risposte Turismo s.r.l., Dorsoduro 1479-30123 Venezia, Italy. Tel: +390412960775; Fax: +390412414941; E-mail: rech@risposteturismo.it




Tourism Review International, Volume 13, pp. 113-119
1544-2721/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Supporting Independent Film Production Through Tourism Collaboration

Diane Cynthia and Sue Beeton

School of Management, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

This article explores the linkages between the film and tourism industries and the potential for the tourist industry to provide support for film production. The aim was to produce recommendations of benefit to both industries concerning methods of strategic development of tourism marketing, linked with independent film production, creating alliances between these industries. The study uses a case study of the NRS group, an independent film production company based in Canberra. The data obtained revealed that tourism bodies can render practical assistance to film production and benefit in return from the exposure gained, particularly from planned publicity. Collaboration and even formal partnerships benefit both industries.

Key words: Film-induced tourism; Film production; Leveraging; Linkages; Collaboration

Address correspondence to Sue Beeton, School of Management, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic 3086, Australia. Tel: (61) 3 9479 3500; Fax: (61) 3 9479 1010; E-mail: s.beeton@latrobe.edu.au




Tourism Review International, Volume 13, pp. 121-127
1544-2721/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Stakeholders' Perspectives of the Impacts of Film and Television-Induced Tourism in Yorkshire

Noëlle O'connor,1 Sheila Flanagan,2 And David Gilbert3

1Department of Humanities, Limerick Institute of Technology, Limerick, Ireland
22School of Hospitality Management and Tourism, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland
3School of Management, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK

This article identifies stakeholders' perspectives of the impact of film- and television-induced tourism on locations using Yorkshire as the case study. Yorkshire has been the film location for a number of popular English TV series and as such is the subject of much location research in the tourism discipline. A series of strategic conversations were held with key stakeholders involved in tourism and destination marketing. This identified a wide range of both positive and negative perspectives of the impacts of film and television using Yorkshire as a location.

Key words: Film; Television; Impacts; Yorkshire; Stakeholder

Address correspondence to Noëlle O'Connor, Department of Humanities, School of Business and Humanities, Limerick Institute of Technology, Moylish Park, Limerick, Ireland. Tel: (353) 61 490166; E-mail: noelle.oconnor@lit.ie




Tourism Review International, Volume 13, pp. 129-137
1544-2721/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Desire, Incidental Tourism, and the Other: Being Japanese in Three Australian Film Landscapes

Gary Best

School of Management, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

Three recent Australian films-The Goddess of 1967 (2000), Japanese Story (2003), and Bondi Tsunami (2004)-have narratives of dislocation, both personal and physical (almost inevitable, given the obvious common feature of Japanese in Australia), and of diverse desires set in iconic landscapes at once both alluring and alienating. The three narratives share the road as a metaphor of both departure and arrival, as well as that of a journey offering not only deeper self-knowledge but also an experience of journeying automotively through the Australian landscape. Here, then, is where the personal landscape meets that of tourism, as each journey is also a search of sorts. Although the touristic nature of the imagery may be incidental to the narrative action, it nevertheless emphasizes how the elemental qualities of the landscape may echo the inner personal landscapes and journeys of the characters. Tacey's book Edge of the Sacred (1995) is used to provide both inspiration and a framework for the discussion.

Key words: Australia; Japanese; Landscape; Journeys; Automobility; Film; Tourism; Image

Address correspondence to Gary Best, School of Management, La Trobe University, Melbourne 3086, Australia. Tel: 61-3-9479 1694; Fax: 61-3-9479 1010; E-mail g.best@latrobe.edu.au




Tourism Review International, Volume 13, pp. 139-146
1544-2721/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Man From Snowy River: Australia's Bush Legend and Commercial Nationalism

Leanne White

Centre for Tourism and Services Research, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia

Various interpretations of The Man from Snowy River have played a central role in keeping the Australian bush myth firmly fixed in the national consciousness. The producers of products and services associated with the legend clearly benefit from the telling and retelling of Banjo Paterson's bush ballad. This article examines the numerous texts of this classic Australian epic and the ways industries such as the entertainment industry, bush clothing, and tourism carefully work to deliberately sustain and nurture the legend. Texts to be examined include the poem, the films, the novel, the TV series, TV advertisements, the welcome sequence performed at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, the Arena Spectacular, and the Australian Outback Spectacular.

Key words: The Man from Snowy River; Commercial nationalism; Bush clothing; High Country tourism

Address correspondence to Leanne White, Centre for Tourism and Services Research, Victoria University, PO Box 14428, Melbourne, Australia. Tel: (61) 3 9919 9551; Fax: (61) 3 9919 4931; E-mail: LeanneK.White@vu.edu.au




Tourism Review International, Volume 13, pp. 147-155
1544-2721/09 $60.00 + .00
Copyright © 2009 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Film-Induced Tourism in the High Country: Recreation and Tourism Contest

W. Glen Croy1 and Anne Buchmann2

1Tourism Research Unit, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia
2School of Economics, Politics and Tourism, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW, Australia

Political, economic, and social changes have increased the importance of tourism in diversifying and sustaining rural areas. This article examines the impact of film-induced tourism on recreational use of the South Island High Country, New Zealand. Changes to the High Country's economic and administrative environment, coupled with image presented and reinforced in the filmed media (prominently in The Lord of the Rings and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe), has amplified landholders' opportunity to engage in tourism. However, the different (and to some degree incompatible) activity and user profiles of traditional recreationists and new tourists has implications for the High Country.

Key words: Lord of the Rings; Rural; Image; Edoras; New Zealand

Address correspondence to Glen Croy, Tourism Research Unit, Monash University, PO Box 1071, Narre Warren 3805, Australia. Tel: (61) 3 9904 7032; Fax: (61) 3 9904 7130; E-mail: glen.croy@buseco.monash.edu.au