ognizant Communication Corporation

TOURISM REVIEW INTERNATIONAL
An Interdisciplinary Journal

(Formerly Pacific Tourism Review)

ABSTRACTS
VOLUME 7, NUMBER 2

Tourism Review International, Volume 7, pp. 61-66
1544-2721/04 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2004 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Five Meals in the Forties: Perspectives on Hospitality Under Extreme Circumstances

Richard W. Braithwaite

School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, Australia

This article examines the characteristics of great hospitality using the memory of an old man reflecting on his life. The outstanding bouts of hospitality all occurred during World War II in Southeast Asia under extreme circumstances, something that may illuminate understanding better than under normal times. While a safe place to sleep was always involved, the key ingredient in making the hospitality memorable was the meal. The food was special but the generosity of the hosts was the most conspicuous element. Implications for commercial hospitality are discussed.

Key words: Meals and hospitality; Extreme circumstances; World War II; Southeast Asia

Address correspondence to Dr. Richard Braithwaite, School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, Military Road, P.O. Box 157, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia. Tel: 61-02-6626-9178; Fax: 61-2-6622-2208; E-mail: dbraithw@scu.edu.au




Tourism Review International, Volume 7, pp. 67-80
1544-2721/04 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2004 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Managing Recreational Scuba Experiences: Exploring Business Challenges for New South Wales Dive Tourism Managers

Kay Dimmock

School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, Australia

As tourists increasingly seek nature-based tourism experiences, the tourism operator is confronted with various challenges. For managers of New South Wales (NSW) recreational scuba operations challenges include ensuring access to high-quality environmental resources, improving market share, and satisfying business targets for the products and experiences they make available. This work explores the management challenges presented to some of these operators within regional NSW. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected using a questionnaire and face-to-face structured interview format. From a random sample of 20 regional NSW dive tourism operators, 15 respondents agreed to participate, with 11 finally participating. Managers responded to questions concerning their roles and discussed current issues for managers within the NSW recreational dive industry. Overall, findings indicate these managers regularly use skills associated with Mentor and Monitor roles in managing their business, whereas skills associated with Broker and Facilitator roles are required, but are less utilized. A view exists that the NSW scuba industry has reached maturity with managers constrained by a need to innovate in the current industry environment.

Key words: Dive tourism; Manager skills; Small business management; Recreational scuba industry; Australia

Address correspondence to Kay Dimmock, Lecturer, School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, P.O. Box 157, Military Road, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia. Tel: 61-1-02-6620-3981; Fax: 61-2-6622-2208; E-mail: kdimmock@scu.edu.au.




Tourism Review International, Volume 7, pp. 81-94
1544-2721/04 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2004 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Australian Waterfalls as Tourism Attractions

Brian J. Hudson

School of Design and Built Environment, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

For a largely arid country with generally low relief, Australia has a remarkably large number of waterfalls. Found mainly near the coast, close to where most of the population lives and near the major tourist resort areas, Australia's falls have long been popular scenic attractions and places for recreation. They play an important role in the country's tourism, even in seaside resort areas where the main attractions are sunshine, sandy beaches, and surf. The aesthetic appeal of waterfalls and their value as recreational and tourism resources are recognized by the inclusion of many in national parks. This article examines the way in which Australian waterfalls have been developed and promoted as tourist attractions. It considers threats to the sustainable use of waterfall resources posed by power schemes and, particularly, by the tourist industry itself. Queensland's Gold Coast is selected as a case study. The discussion draws largely on an examination of tourist literature from the 19th to the 21st century, including holiday brochures and guidebooks, together with field observation in Australia and other countries.

Key words: Waterfalls; Tourist attractions; Tourist literature; Gold Coast; Queensland; Australia

Address correspondence to Dr. Brian Hudson, School of Design and Built Environment, Queensland University of Technology, Gardens Point Campus, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, QLD 4001, Australia. Tel: 61-07-3864-2628; Fax: 61-7-3864-1528; E-mail: b.hudson@qut.edu.au




Tourism Review International, Volume 7, pp. 95-105
1544-2721/04 $20.00 + .00
Copyright © 2004 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Contribution of International Students to Tourism Beyond the Core Educational Experience: Evidence From Australia

David B. Weaver

Department of Health, Fitness and Recreation Resources, George Mason University, Manassas, VA

A study was conducted in 2001 to identify the scope and extent of tourism-related activities undertaken by international students within Australia over the duration of their overseas education. The sample consisted of 139 students from Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Japan, and Singapore who attended a large university in the Brisbane-Gold Coast corridor prior to 2000. Responses to a nine-page mail-out questionnaire revealed that all international students visited attractions in the Gold Coast, while most (82%) traveled within Australia for recreational or social purposes during their period of study. A similar portion (78%) hosted visitors from their home country, while a smaller number (52%) had made at least one return trip to Australia at the time of the survey. Two thirds of the respondents indicated that they had influenced other persons from their home country to study in Australia. Each international student generated on average expenditures of AUS$12,000 from tourism-related activities within Australia. The results indicate that international students have an influential ongoing effect on the Australian tourism industry over and above their education-related activities and expenditures.

Key words: International students; Educational tourism; Australia

Address correspondence to Dr. David B. Weaver, Department of Health, Fitness and Recreation Resources, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, MS 4E5, Manassas, VA 20110-2203. Tel: (703) 993-4260; Fax: (703) 993-2025; E-mail: dweaver3@gmu.edu