Tourism Culture & Communication 18(2) Abstracts

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Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 18, pp. 85-99
1098-304X/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830418X
15230353469483
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Elephants in Norway: Meanings and Authenticity of Souvenirs From a Seller/Crafter Perspective

Hannelene Schilar and E. Carina H. Keskitalo

Department of Geography and Economic History, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden

Souvenirs are fascinating little things that both incorporate as well as illustrate the global–local interplay of tourism. They need to be approached in their complexity as they intertwine people, places, and meanings. This study contributes to a deeper understanding of souvenirs from the perspectives of souvenir sellers and crafters. Taking a constructivist approach, we are interested in the ways sellers and crafters construct meaning and authenticity in souvenirs. The work is based on fieldwork including 35 semistructured interviews with souvenir sellers and crafters in northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland (both self-ascribed “indigenous” and “nonindigenous” participants). Our findings elaborate on: (1) the sellers’ and crafters’ conception of the term “souvenir,” (2) their considerations in making, choosing, and selling souvenirs, and (3) the ways in which they authenticate souvenirs, in particular through storytelling. We find that the crafters and sellers often had a negative conception of the term “souvenir” and preferred not to call their products souvenirs. However, they were aware as well as appreciated that their products might become souvenirs in the interaction with the tourist. Interviewees further highlight the importance of storytelling for these processes of becoming or authentication, where they also express agency and power over these representations. Furthermore, the findings elucidate their relative entrepreneurial freedom and ways of balancing aesthetic as well as economic concerns. The study calls for further research, in particular on the ways stories authenticate, but also taking into methodological account the complexity of the term souvenir, as well as seeking more comprehensive approaches including varieties of sellers and crafters, using a spectrum from self-defined indigenous to nonindigenous identities.

Key words: Souvenirs; Authenticity; Northern Europe; Indigenous tourism; Sámi

Address correspondence to Hannelen Schilar, Department of Geography and Economic History, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå, Sweden. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 18, pp. 101-116
1098-304X/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830418X
15230353469492
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Food Tourism and the Use of Authenticity in Thailand

Thanya Lunchaprasith* and Donald Macleod†

*International College, Silparkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
†University of Glasgow, Crichton Campus, Dumfries, Scotland

This article explores the concept of authenticity as it relates to its use by hosts at tourist destinations, the relationship between food and tourism, especially food produced and sold by market traders, and the various uses of authenticity by traders and tourists. It specifically aims to further our understanding of the use of authenticity in Thailand by stakeholders in a synergistic process, thereby filling a gap in research. Mixed research methods were used (interviews, questionnaires, and observation of the markets) with fieldwork totaling 6 months in Central Thailand. Eight different markets were chosen providing qualitative material leading to a sample of emic material on attitudes and approaches to authenticity, its construction, and utilization. It was found that authenticity, as it relates to traditional food markets, has been constructed by stakeholders. Authenticity may differ through the products, according to the personal experiences and motivations of the agents involved. Additionally, the tourists’ experiences and expectations impact on the final product in an evolving process. It is recommended that traditional food may be further promoted in traditional markets by stimulating visitors’ engagement in food culture. The article argues that authenticity, in its sociocultural constructivist context, is a relativistic phenomenon, which may be seen as existing in a continuum where there are degrees of authenticity.

Key words: Food; Authenticity; Thailand; Traditional market; Stakeholders

Address correspondence to Donald Macleod, University of Glasgow, Crichton Campus, Dumfries, Scotland, DG1 4ZL. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 18, pp. 117-131
1098-304X/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830418X
15230353469500
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourist Perceptions of Living Authenticity in Indigenous Tourism Destinations: The Case of Smangus Village in Taiwan

Pei-Hsin Hsu

Graduate School of International Development, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan

Tourists’ perceptions of authenticity are an essential component in indigenous tourism and it has been acknowledged as a driving force that motivates tourists’ intention to revisit the destination. However, previous studies mainly focused on the static concept of nonliving authenticity such as heritage sites and natural landscapes. Perceptions of dynamic concept of living authenticity in indigenous tourism destination are understudied. In order to fill up this gap, this study examines tourists’ perceptions of “living authenticity” in Smangus village in Taiwan, and examines how these perceptions influence tourists’ intention to revisit the village. The survey was conducted from May 22 to June 14, 2015 based on 194 respondents. Exploratory factor analysis delineated three dimensions of tourists’ perceptions of living authenticity in Smangus village: object-related, intrapersonal, and interpersonal authenticity. Ordinal logistic regression model was used to determine the effect of perceptions of living authenticity on the intention to revisit. The results show that perceptions of living authenticity positively influence tourists’ intention to revisit Smangus village. By combining theoretical discussions and empirical analysis, this study contributes to a better understanding of tourists’ perceptions of living authenticity in the indigenous tourism destination.

Key words: Living authenticity; Indigenous tourism; Intention to revisit

Address correspondence to Pei-Hsin Hsu, Postdoctoral researcher, Graduate School of International Development, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601, Japan. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 18, pp. 133-145
1098-304X/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830418X
15230353469519
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Using Couchsurfing.com and its Association With Generalized Trust

Alexander Ronzhyn

Institute for IS Research, University of Koblenz-Landau, Koblenz, Germany

Trust is necessary for the functioning of Couchsurfing.com service. Without a certain degree of trust, the users would not let other Couchsurfing members into their homes, yet the trust has to form prior to any face-to-face interaction. This article explores the concept of trust in Couchsurfing through a quantitative survey of its users, looking into the connection between an individual’s experience on the network and generalized trust. The positive association between Couchsurfing use and individual generalized trust is established, while negative experiences in the network are found to have significant negative impact on one’s level of trust.

Key words: Generalized trust; Couchsurfing; Social media; Trust formation

Address correspondence to Alexander Ronzhyn, University of Koblenz-Landau, Institute for IS Research, Research Group e-Government Universitätsstraße 1, 56070 Koblenz, Germany. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 18, pp. 133-145
1098-304X/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/109830418X
15230353469528
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Critical Review

Slum Tourism: A Review of State-of-the-Art Scholarship

Rodanthi Tzanelli

School of Sociology & Social Policy, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK

In this review article, Rodanthi Tzanelli notes that (today) “slum,” “favela,” or “township” tourism (i.e., visitations to urban sites of squalor and poverty for leisure, education, or philanthropy) has evolved into a mobility trend worthy of dedicated study by tourism scholars. She signposts relevant contemporary studies and arguments on the subject by focusing upon the ways in which slum tourist “motivations” are structured socially and culturally at transcultural, international levels and not just as localized or individualized preferences. As a result, this review article taps into issues of capitalist demand and supply of exotic poverty and otherness. Tzanelli’s aim is to highlight the social scientific traditions on which present dominant arguments on tourism supply and motivation are constructed, so as to shed light on the underlying norms and values by which the overall study area is informed. To this end, she discusses how different analytical modes connect to specific “gazes” or styles of study of slum tourism, which are by turn informed by particular epistemological frameworks. In her view, such epistemologies produce different versions of reality about slums that circulate in intellectual and policy networks. (Abstract by the Reviews Editor)

Key words: Capitalism; Consumption; Epistemology; Gaze; Slum tourism

Address correspondence to Rodanthi Tzanelli, School of Sociology & Social Policy, Social Sciences Building, Room 12.04, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, West Yorkshire, UK. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it