Tourism Review International 22(2) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 22, pp. 99-115
1544-2721/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427218X
15319286372252
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Sociodemographic, Psychographic, and Behavioral Correlates of Fun in the Destination Context

Asli D. A. Tasci and Wei Wei

Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA

Over the past decade, experiential consumption has received a growing attention from tourism and hospitality scholars. Even though fun is one of the most used concepts in daily rhetoric, it was mostly mentioned as a related concept in studying other variables in tourism, hospitality, and leisure contexts. The current study investigated fun as a construct and its sociodemographic, psychographic, and behavioral correlates. On an online research platform, 412 respondents living in the US answered questions about dimensions of fun related to destinations, sociodemographic, psychographic, and several travel behavior variables. Data revealed that both gender and the emotion/logic-based decision-making trait explain the importance of destination fun dimensions. Expectation of destination fun was further found to be significantly correlated with the preferences for travel types, travel risk concerns, and preferences for travel information sources. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Key words: Experiential consumption; Fun; Destination; Travel motivation; Travel risk; Social media

Address correspondence to Wei Wei, Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, 9907 Universal Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32819, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 22, pp. 117-130
1544-2721/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427218X
15319286372270
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Exploring Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Adoption in the Tourism Industry: The Case of Malawi

Grace Kamanga* and Felix G. Bello*†

*Department of Tourism, Mzuzu University, Mzuzu, Malawi
†Department of Tourism, School of Humanities, Southeast University, Nanjing, China

Many studies on corporate social responsibility (CSR) have focused on the understanding of CSR, CSR practices, reasons for and barriers against the adoption of CSR, and the extent of adoption. In tourism, CSR has been closely linked to responsible tourism as tourism is believed to bring with it a number of negative impacts; hence, CSR is used as one of the ways of protecting the very resources that attract tourists to ensure the sustainability of tourism businesses. More studies have been conducted on CSR adoption in hospitality operations than the tourism sector worldwide. This study explores the practices and perspectives on CSR by tour operating companies in Malawi and the extent to which they have adopted the concept. A qualitative research approach was used for this study with semistructured interviews targeting senior managers of the tour operating companies. The study found that most tour operating companies have not fully adopted CSR.

Key words: Corporate social responsibility (CSR); Tour operating companies; CSR adoption; Tourism industry; Malawi

Address correspondence to Felix G. Bello, Department of Tourism, Mzuzu University, Private Bag 201, Mzuzu, Malawi. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 22, pp. 131-142
1544-2721/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427218X
15319286372289
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Relationship of Perceived Service Quality With Revisitation and Subjective Well-Being of Chinese Tourists: The Role of Emotions and Destination Identification

Lujun Su,* Scott R. Swanson,† and Xiaohong Chen*

*Business School Central South University; Collaborative Innovation Center of Resource-conserving & Environment-friendly Society and Ecological Civilization; Mobile E-business Collaborative Innovation Center of Hunan Province, Changsha, Hunan, China
†Department of Management and Marketing, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire, WI, USA

Utilizing Mehrabian-Russell’s Stimulus–Organism–Response framework, this research investigates how service quality elicits positive emotions, negative emotions, and destination identification, contributing to tourists’ subjective well-being and intentions to return to a destination. Using an intercept sampling approach at a natural and cultural destination, a total of 539 completed questionnaires were obtained from Chinese tourists. The findings demonstrate that perceived service quality can enhance tourists’ positive emotions and identification with a destination while decreasing negative emotions. This study also provides empirical evidence for a direct relationship between emotions in tourism consumption and destination identification processes. In addition, the results suggest that emotions and destination identification can bring about both economic benefits to a destination via revisitation and positive social outcomes for tourists in the form of subjective well-being.

Key words: Quality; Emotion; Identification; Subjective well-being; Revisitation

Address correspondence to Scott R. Swanson, Professor of Marketing, Department of Management and Marketing, University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Eau Claire WI 54701, USA. Tel: 715-836-5127; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 22, pp. 143-151
1544-2721/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427218X
15319286372298
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Conceptualizing Terroir Wine Tourism

Byron Marlowe* and Sojung Lee†

*School of Hospitality Business Management, Washington State University, Richland, WA, USA
†Department of Apparel, Events Hospitality Management, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA

Terroir tourism has been recently recognized to have the potential for developing a new tourism product. However, little research has investigated terroir tourism and its characteristics, differentiating it from wine tourism. For the purpose of this study, characteristics of terroir tourism were categorized into the constructs of territory, plant growing, advertising, and identity. Through content analysis, the researchers found that terroir tourism has 59 characteristics developed from the literature review on terroir and its relationship to wine and rural tourism. The findings will help future research to better understand the characteristics of terroir tourism and differentiate it from wine tourism. An outcome of this study validates the conceptual framework of terroir tourism and will help vineyards to develop further rural agritourism practices based on their terroir characteristics.

Key words: Terroir tourism; Wine tourism; Rural tourism; Terroir; Viticulture

Address correspondence to Byron Marlowe, Ph.D., Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Hospitality Business Management, Washington State University, Richland, WA 99354, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 22, pp. 153-168
1544-2721/18 $60.00 + .00
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3727/154427218X
15319286372306
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2018 Cognizant, LLC.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Wine Tourists in Emerging Wine Regions: A Study of Tasting Room Visitors in the Great Lakes Region of the US

Dan McCole, Don Holecek, Crystal Miller-Eustice, and Jenni Soohee Lee

Department of Community Sustainability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA

Since
2000, the number of wineries in the US has nearly tripled. Many of the new wineries are small, located in regions not known for wine production, and often specialize in lesser known wine grape varieties that are suited to the local environment. With over 900 wineries, the Great Lakes region in the northern US accounts for a small percentage of US wine production, but the wine industry there plays an important role in rural economies that historically relied on manufacturing, extraction, and non-wine agriculture. The emerging wine industry in new locations is also providing new opportunities for people to experience a winery visit. In fact, most small wineries rely primarily on sales from their tasting rooms. However, the factors that impact the purchase decision at a winery are different than those at retail establishments and restaurants, and there is evidence that the people who visit wineries in emerging regions are different than typical wine consumers and visitors to the world’s best-known wine regions. Given the importance of winery visitors to the success of wineries in emerging regions, it is critical that winery leaders and tourism stakeholders understand their consumers and the factors that impact their travel and wine purchase decisions. This article presents the results of a study of over 3,000 visitors to wineries in three Great Lakes region states. Findings show that the main reason for visiting wineries is for recreational experiences rather than to purchase wine; however, almost all wine tourists contacted for this study purchased several bottles of wine to take home. Moreover, visiting wineries is an important reason for travel decisions, and wine tourists spend a significant amount of money in the region while they are there. Additional findings can inform the decisions of wine tourism stakeholders and provide insights on visitors to emerging wine regions.

Key words: Wine tourism; Emerging wine regions; Segmentation; Visitor profiles; Market research

Address correspondence to Dan McCole, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Community Sustainability, Michigan State University, 480 Wilson Rd., Room 131, East Lansing, MI 48824-1222, USA. Tel: 517-802-7011; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it