Event Management 14(1) Abstracts

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Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.1–15
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12724735767471
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Scale Development and Testing: A New Measure of Cognitive Satisfaction in Sports Tourism

David S. Martin and Martin O’Neill

Department of Hotel and Restaurant Management, Auburn University, Auburn, AL, USA

As with most service providers, sporting venues now have to serve an increasingly discerning public, who, it seems, are now more eager than ever to complain and transfer their allegiances to perceived providers of quality services. In an attempt to delight their customer/fan base, venue operators are now required to get as close to the consumer as possible so that they are better able to anticipate, predict, and thereby meet their needs, wants, and expectations. Inherent in any such approach is the need to continually monitor organizational performance so that energies can be better directed at consistently satisfying customer needs. This has led to the development of an array of measurement tools and techniques aimed at establishing and evaluating service quality and customer satisfaction levels. Despite this high level of sensitivity to the effects of satisfied consumers on the overall success of businesses, very little research has been dedicated to understanding and/or defining the satisfaction construct in the context of spectator sports. Indeed, until recently, very little research has examined the unique determinants of fan satisfaction outside of the actual outcome of the game (win vs. loss). This article reports on the development and testing of a measure of customer satisfaction, developed specifically for sporting events. The scale draws from several different research areas in order to facilitate a measure that allows for a valid and reliable assessment of the entire game day experience. One major limitation of the current study is the heavy reliance upon student respondents, in both focus group work and in terms of the sample produced.

Key words: Customer satisfaction; Sports tourism; Service quality

Address correspondence to Martin O’Neill, Department of Hotel and Restaurant Management, Auburn University, 328D Spidle Hall, Auburn, AL 36849, USA. Tel: 334-844-3264; Fax: 334-844-3279; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.17–36
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12724735767516
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Crafting a Social License to Operate: A Case Study of Vancouver 2010’s Cypress Olympic Venue

Ian F. Ponsford and Peter W. Williams

School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada

Olympic Games often require organizing committees to construct major sports venues. As private entities not clearly accountable to the public, these organizing committees or “Olympic Corporations” have been accused of bypassing normal planning protocols, and in the process transforming the nature of host cities with little stakeholder consultation. This article traces the evolution of relationships between Vancouver 2010’s Olympic Corporation and stakeholders concerned with Cypress Olympic Venue (COV) development. It suggests that because a balance of power existed between the Olympic Corporation and stakeholder groups, the relationship transformed from being primarily antagonistic to a more constructive configuration through successive interactions. While the Olympic Corporation’s stakeholder engagement strategies appear successful at the COV, stakeholder respondents still exhibit skepticism about Olympic organizers. This article emphasizes the importance of crafting a “social license to operate” in the Olympic planning context and uncovers some essential prerequisites for the development of corporate-community relationships.

Key words: Stakeholder engagement; Olympic Games; Corporate social responsibility; Social license to operate; Sustainability; Vancouver 2010

Address correspondence to Ian F. Ponsford, School of Resource and Environmental Management, Centre for Tourism Policy and Research, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, Canada. Tel: (1)604-291-3074; Fax: (1)604-291-4968; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.37–52
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12724735767552
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Value Creation Through Stakeholder Participation: A Case Study of an Event in the High North

Nina Katrine Prebensen

Tromsø University Business School, Tromsø, Norway

Valuecreation as a result of stakeholders’ participation and involvement is explored in network and cocreation frameworks. The study analyzes seven various stakeholder groups and their purposes for, and structures in, joining an event in the High North. In addition, the study examines the stakeholders’ evaluation of values created through their own and others’ participation in the event (i.e., value cocreation). The case study is a dog-sled race in Finnmark, Norway, the Finnmarksløpet. The stakeholders include both organizations and individuals. The study employs various explorative techniques to acknowledge value creation within a stakeholder perspective. The findings reveal that the various groups entail numerous reasons for participating in the event, classified as autotelic and instrumental value experiences. The stakeholders experience various types of values through their participation and involvement, dependent of their own—or in the case of representing a firm, the firm’s—motivation and participation in the event. The study explores value creation as a consequence of other stakeholders’ participation as well; that is, the sponsors get amplified value with increased media coverage, and more spectators’ participation (by their presence or via various mediums). As a result the event becomes more attractive for both sponsors and media. The host organization receives value from all stakeholders’ participations. The study also points to how destinations might gain values through networking and cooperation, exemplified by stakeholders’ involvement and participation in an event.

Key words: Cocreation; Values; Stakeholder; Networks; Experience

Address correspondence to Nina K. Prebensen, Associate Professor, Tromsø University Business School, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Tel: +47 77 64 67 66; Fax: +47 77 64 60 20; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.53–67
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12724735767598
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Managing Hindu Festivals in Pilgrimage Sites: Emerging Trends, Opportunities, and Challenges

Kiran A. Shinde

School of Behavioral, Cognitive, and Social Sciences, Geography and Planning, University of New England, Armidale, Australia

Festivals constitute an integral part of Hindu religious practices and the Hindu festivals assume their fullest expressions in pilgrimage sites—the repositories of religious culture and traditions. Yet, understanding of the celebration of festivals as religious and pilgrimage events is limited and the extent and nature of their transformation under the growing influences of tourism remains relatively unexplored, especially in a non-Western context. This article shows that festivals are organized, celebrated, and transmitted as rituals through social networks and patronage relationships between various kinds of religious functionaries in a pilgrimage center: pilgrims, visitors, and festival attendees. Festivals, by highlighting intersections between mythology, cosmology, and religious rituals and practices, fuel the cultural economy in pilgrimage sites. This article examines changing trends in the organization and management of events surrounding the festival of Holi in Vrindavan, a pilgrimage site in north India, and aims to provide a window of understanding into festival management and burgeoning cultural tourism in Hindu pilgrimage sites in India.

Key words: Holi; Hindu festivals; Religious functionaries; Religious tourism; Vrindavan; India

Address correspondence to Kiran A. Shinde, School of Behavioral, Cognitive, and Social Sciences, Geography and Planning, University of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.69–82
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12724735767679
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

FESTPERF: A Service Quality Measurement Scale for Festivals

Aaron Tkaczynski and Robin Stokes

School of Tourism, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

As a service quality measurement tool, SERVPERF has gained an increasing level of prominence among marketing theorists. However, despite the apparent usefulness of this “performance-only” measure of quality in various settings, research is yet to confirm or discount which, if any, of the SERVPERF dimensions are salient in a festival setting. Consequently, it is unknown which specific factors, if any, are predictors of visitor satisfaction and repurchase intent. Results of this study at an Australian Jazz and Blues Festival led to the creation of FESTPERF, a three-factor solution that differed from the generic SERVPERF instrument and did not replicate the SERVQUAL factors. Two of these factors, Professionalism and Environment, predicted visitor satisfaction that may, in turn, lead to repurchase. The third factor, Core Service, did not predict intent by festival goers to revisit. A practical implication of this research is the availability of an event-specific model of service quality for further testing at other types of music festivals (e.g., rock, gospel, or pop, or at other special events.)

Key words: Festival; FESTPERF; Measurement; Service Quality

Address correspondence to Aaron Tkaczynski, School of Tourism, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.83–89
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12724735767633
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note
An Analysis of Event Managers’ Problem-Solving Propensity: Applying the Problem-Solving Inventory (PSI) to the Field of Event Management

Dana V. Tesone, Mary Jo Ross, and Randall Upchurch

Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, Universal Boulevard, Orlando, FL, USA

The field of event management encompasses the conceptualization of a festival or event, a determination of the intended target market, coordination of systems, policies, and procedures needed to plan and support the event, and the eventual administration of a proposed event. This broad scope of functional duties surrounding event planning requires that an event manger have at his or her disposal a diverse repertoire of problem-solving abilities. Using Heppner’s Problem-Solving Inventory (PSI) the researchers determined that the sampled group of event professionals from the International Special Events Society (ISEP) exhibited high levels of problem-solving self-confidence, high approach behavior, and high levels of personal control in their role as event managers

Key words: Event management; Event professionals; Problem-solving skills; Hospitality education

Address correspondence to Dana V. Tesone, Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, 9907 Universal Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32819, USA. Tel: 407-903-8041; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it