Event Management 14(3) Abstracts

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Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.183–192
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12825895093515
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Building Association Attendance: Differences Between Chapter, Regional, and Annual Meetings From the Perception of the Association Members

Jill Fjelstul, Kimberly Severt, and Deborah Breiter

Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA

The objective of this study was to identify meeting patterns and trends related to chapter, regional, and/or annual conference attendance. Factors likely to increase attendance, attendance trends over a 5-year period, recommendations by association members, and the preferred mode of delivery were identified. Results will assist meeting planners in providing maximum benefits to association members and to potentially increase attendance at each conference level.

Key words: Associations; Conference attendance; Meetings; Conventions; Meeting type

Address correspondence to Jill Fjelstul, Ed.D., Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, 9907 Universal Blvd., Orlando, FL 32819, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.193–204
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12825895093551
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Effects of Hosting a Mega-Sport Event on Country Image

Geir Gripsrud,* Erik B. Nes,* and Ulf H. Olsson†

*Department of Marketing, BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway
†Department of Economics, BI Norwegian School of Management, Oslo, Norway

Nations and cities compete to host international mega-sport events such as the Olympic Games even if very large costs are incurred. Country image may be changed by hosting such events, and country image dimensions are in turn related to product image and behavioral intentions regarding product purchase and tourism. In this article a model of these relationships is developed, based on several streams of literature. The empirical study reported relates to the Winter Olympics in Turin, Italy in 2006. A quasi-experimental design was employed based upon two samples of undergraduate students in Norway. Data was gathered both before and after the Olympic Games took place. The study indicates that dimensions of country image for those being very interested in sports may be changed by hosting a mega-sport event. However, there is no guarantee that the image of the host country will improve. It may actually deteriorate. This finding underscores the importance of managing international sport events properly.

Key words: Mega-sport event; Olympic Games; Nation branding; Country image

Address correspondence to Professor Geir Gripsrud, Department of Marketing, BI Norwegian School of Management, Nydalsveien 37, N-0442 Oslo, Norway. Tel: +47 4641 0536; Fax: +47 2326 4792; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.205–214
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12825895093597
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Consumer Satisfaction and Event Quality Perception: A Case of US Open Taekwondo Championship

Yong Jaea Ko,* Min Kil Kim,* Yu Kyoum Kim,† Jeoung-Hak Lee,‡, and Kevin Cattani*

*University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
†Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA
‡Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea

Sporting events not only attract sport participants, spectators, and tourists to the host city, but also increase media attention and create positive impact on a community. Currently, numerous martial arts events (MA) are held in the US. However, scholarly efforts have not been made to understand the spectator profile in MA events. The purpose of this study was to examine the demographic characteristics of US Open Taekwondo event spectators and their perceived event quality and satisfaction by focusing on gender and age segments. The results showed that event quality perceptions vary depending on gender and age groups. Given these results, implications for future study and practice for event managers are discussed.

Key words: Event quality; Taekwondo; Consumer profiles

Address correspondence to Dr. Yong Jae Ko, Sport Management Program, University of Florida, 186A Florida Gym, P.O. Box 118208, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. Tel: (352)392-4042, Ext. 1277; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.215–223
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12825895093632
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Food Safety at Fairs and Festivals: Vendor Knowledge and Violations at a Regional Festival

Ji-Eun Lee, Barbara A. Almanza, and Douglas C. Nelson

Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA

This 2-year study examined the food safety knowledge of food vendors at one of Indiana’s largest festivals, and compared it with health inspection violations at this event. Ninety-four percent of nonprofit food vendors in 2006 and 100% of nonprofit food vendors in 2008 participated. Descriptive statistics, correlation matrices, and general linear models (GLM) were employed. Results for average knowledge scores were that respondents were able to correctly answer 6.16 out of 10 questions (62%) in 2006 and 10.2 out of 14 (73%) in 2008. Results from the correlations and the GLM showed that vendors serving temperature control for safety (TCS) food had significantly higher knowledge scores in 2006. Vendors’ ages (p < 0.05) and attendance at the educational workshop (p < 0.1) impacted the vendors’ knowledge scores significantly in 2008. Food safety knowledge and inspection violations were not found to be correlated. Several implications are suggested for training programs to improve vendors’ food safety knowledge, and practices.

Key words: Food safety knowledge; Vendors; Fairs and festivals; Violations

Address correspondence to Ji-Eun Lee, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Purdue University, Stone Hall, Room 102, 700 W. State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2059, USA. Tel: (765) 494-9847; Fax: (765) 494-0327; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.225–238
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12825895093678
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Safety and Hostility at Special Events: Lessons From Australian Gay and Lesbian Festivals

Kevin Markwell* and Stephen Tomsen†

*Centre for Tourism, Leisure, Work and School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia
†School of Social Science, University of Western Sydney, Penrith South DC, Australia

This article explores aspects of risk, safety, and hostility as perceived and experienced by participants at large-scale gay and lesbian festivals and special events held in Australia. These public celebrations of gay and lesbian identity have considerable economic, social, and cultural benefits and they contribute significantly to the creation of cosmopolitan imagery for the cities in which they are held. In particular, the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras (SGLMG) is now internationally known as a major gay and lesbian festival and attracts substantial numbers of both domestic and inbound tourists. The article reports on the results of an Internet-based questionnaire survey that sought information concerning gay, lesbian, and queer participants’ perceptions and experiences of hostility, threats, and violence on the basis of their sexual identity before, during, and after these events. Event organizers and public officials involved in planning and management emphasize the order and goodwill of these occasions. Nevertheless, participants from these sexual minorities feel notably unsafe or threatened in relation to significant aspects of attendance at large-scale nighttime events with a wide heterosexual participation, and this may prove to be an important factor in the long term viability of these events.

Key words: Gay and lesbian; Safety; Risk; Festivals; Australia; Homophobia

Address correspondence to Kevin Markwell, Centre for Tourism, Leisure, Work and School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia. Tel: 02 66203922; Fax: 02 66222208; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.239–250
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12825895093713
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Examining Corporate Sponsorsip of Charitable Events in the Greater Charleston Area

Sharon Nadav, Wayne W. Smith, and Andrea Canberg

Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC, USA

Despite an increasing trend of businesses using event sponsorship as a marketing strategy and tool to enhance corporate image, limited research is available to understand the basis for businesses’ decision making regarding event sponsorship and the subsequent evaluation of the value of that sponsorship. The purpose of this study is to develop an event sponsorship decision-making model based on how companies in the greater Charleston, South Carolina area choose and evaluate sponsorship of local charitable events. The findings in this study suggest that six primary factors influence event sponsorship decision making: business policy, type of organization, event type, marketing strategy, projected outputs, and perceived value. The emphasis on each of these factors in the decision-making process was also influenced by the business’s orientation toward pure marketing or pure philanthropy. A strategy for approaching businesses regarding event sponsorship for charitable events is suggested based on the findings in this study.

Key words: Sponsorship; Decision making; Policy; Marketing

Address correspondence to Wayne W. Smith, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424-001, USA. Tel: (843)953-6663; Fax: (834)953-5697; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 14, pp.251–256
1525-9951/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599510X12825895093759
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note
Exploring the Connection Between Anthropology and Tourism: Patrimony and Heritage Tourism in Perspective

Maximiliano E. Korstanje

Department of Economics, University of Palermo, Argentina

The onset of anthropology was accompanied with involuntarily or not of the colonialism that characterized the 19th century. This does not mean that anthropology was functional to colonialism but certainly paved the way for its upsurge. Based on the concerns of the first ethnologists, who warned about the disappearance of cultures of colonized aborigine tribes, the present article emphasizes two provocative theses. One refers to the cynical European paternalism that, on one hand, nourishes a discourse associated with the needs of protection while at the same time expanding the political hegemony from center to periphery. Secondly, it is hypothesized that these earlier mentioned concerns have endured in the threshold of time to the present day. With this background in mind, one can argue that capitalism overrides the needs of protection and upends their meanings. At least the concepts of Patrimony, Protection, and Heritage should be revisited. Certainly early capitalism emerged in our world associated to two previous forces: novelty and conversation. This means that on the one hand capitalism operates in the novelty of goods and products to establish new channels of consumption, but on the other hand services should be placed in several compartments foster transactional exchanges.

Key words: Paternalism; Concerns; Colonialism; Protection; Media term; Patrimony

Address correspondence to Prof. Maximiliano E. Korstanje, Lecturer, Department of Economics, University of Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it