Information Technology & Tourism 12(2) Abstracts

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Volume 12, Number 2

Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 12 pp. 107–123
1098-3058/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830510X12887971002620
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Review
Intelligent Persuasive Technologies: Prospects for Tourism

Marco Guerini and Oliviero Stock

FBK-Irst, Trento, Italy

Persuasion has been studied for more than two millennia. Basically it can be viewed as the collection of methodologies aiming at changing, by means of communication, the mental state of the receiver, in view of a certain action (or set of actions) to be performed by the receiver. Inspired by this tradition, and by the practical realizations in the world of advertising, in this article a novel generation of intelligent interfaces is introduced, based on the idea that systems will have goals of their own to pursue, as far as inducing users (or rather any audience) to believe something, do something or change their attitude. The world of leisure and of tourism can specifically be impacted by such interfaces. In the article the main concepts are introduced, as well as elements that characterize persuasion systems in general; a revisitation of the concept of promotion campaign leads to the description of research prototypes and a short analysis of prospects for tourism.

Key words: Persuasion; Persuasive systems; Intelligent interfaces; Emotion; Promotion campaign

Address correspondence to Oliviero Stock, FBK-Irst, Via Sommarive 18, 38100 Trento, Italy. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Information Technology & Tourism
, Vol. 12 pp. 125–137
1098-3058/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830510X12887971002666
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Theorizing Web 2.0 Phenomena in Tourism: A Sociological Signpost

Roman Egger

Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Puch Urstein, Austria

The term Web 2.0 is currently on everyone’s lips; even the tourism industry is awash with decision makers who are frantically searching for standardized, practicable guidelines on how not to sleep through yet again what has been touted as the new era of the Internet Version 2.0—especially now that we are finally getting a handle on Version 1.0. As to be expected, the checklists and manuals we have long searched for that offer us instruction on how to encounter this phenomenon are for the most part lacking. This is not surprising when you consider confronting the challenges of an extraordinarily vague formulation. In workshops, symposiums, and congresses, people throw catchwords and technical terms about in an effort to describe what Web 2.0 stands for and determine its apparent meaning for tourism. Profound issues and attempts at explanations are rare indeed, and empirically verified statements are almost wholly lacking. Therefore, the aim of this article is to deliver a selection of sociological explanatory approaches, thereby creating the theoretical starting blocks for further research efforts. Consequently, the objective here cannot be to explain the theories in their entirety and discuss in detail their individual contributions to the various Web 2.0 phenomena. Instead, the goal is to bring to light starting points for a theoretically founded debate on the subject. The overview in the form of a table at the end of the contribution describes selected sociological approaches and puts them into the context of Web 2.0 and tourism by way of examples.

Key words: Web 2.0; Social web; Sociological theories; Action theory; Systems theory; Symbolic interactionism; Theory of dramaturgical action

Address correspondence to Roman Egger, Salzburg University of Applied Sciences, Urstein Süd 1, A-5412 Puch Urstein, Austria. Tel: +43 (0)50 2211-1357; Fax: +43 (0)50 2211-1399; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Information Technology & Tourism
, Vol. 12 pp. 139–152
1098-3058/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830510X12887971002701
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Antecedents and Impacts of Trust in Travel-Related Consumer-Generated Media

Kyung Hyan Yoo* and Ulrike Gretzel†

*Department of Communication, William Paterson University, Wayne, NJ, USA
†Laboratory for Intelligent Systems in Tourism, Department of Recreation, Park & Tourism Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

This study investigated the factors influencing trust in travel-related consumer-generated media (CGM) and the degree to which trust affects the benefits and impacts of using CGM when planning pleasure trips. An online survey of US Internet users was conducted with a total of 1,170 individuals responding to questions regarding their perceptions and use of CGM for travel planning. The findings show that CGM use is widespread and that trust depends on the type of website on which the CGM is posted, perceptions of other CGM creators as well as CGM readers’ personality. Also, those who have greater trust in CGM report greater impacts and derive greater benefits from their CGM use.

Key words: Consumer-generated media (CGM); Online trust; Trip planning; Travel

Address correspondence to Ulrike Gretzel, Laboratory for Intelligent Systems in Tourism, Department of Recreation, Park & Tourism Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-2261, USA. Tel: +1-979-862-4043; Fax: +1-979-845-0446; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Information Technology & Tourism, Vol. 12 pp. 153–173
1098-3058/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830510X12887971002747
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Online Travelers’ Decision Makings: A New Equation Model to Evaluate Impacts of Website, Search Intention, and Trust

Ivan Wen

School of Travel Industry Management, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI, USA

This article empirically tests a structural equation model to explore the impacts of quality of website design, travelers’ search intentions, and travelers’ trust on their online purchase intentions of travel product(s). Data were collected through an Internet survey of consumers of an online travel service company. The study found that when consumers evaluate a website design, they consider information quality, system quality, and service quality as the most important factors. The findings also confirm that quality of website design, consumers’ search intention, and consumers’ trust influence their online purchase intention. Future research can use this study as a base model to examine e-consumer behavior, travelers’ repurchase intentions, and e-loyalty in the travel industry.

Key words: Website design; e-Consumer behavior; Consumer trust; Online search; Purchase intention

Address correspondence to Ivan Wen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Hospitality Management, University of Hawaii at Manoa, George Hall 203, 2560 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA. Tel: 808-956-8934; Cell: 808-388-1616; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Information Technology & Tourism
, Vol. 12 pp. 175–195
1098-3058/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830510X12887971002783
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Context-Based Adaptation of Mobile Applications in Tourism

Wolfram Höpken,*† Matthias Fuchs,*‡ Markus Zanker,§ and Thomas Beer*

*eTourism Competence Center Austria (ECCA), Innsbruck, Austria
†University of Applied Sciences Ravensburg-Weingarten, Weingarten, Germany
‡Mid-Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden
§University Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt, Austria

Mobile guides (based on PDAs, smart phones, or mobile phones) play an increasingly important role in tourism, giving tourists ubiquitous access to relevant information especially during their trip. Due to a more difficult access to mobile applications in a ubiquitous usage environment, based on time constraints, lighting conditions, bandwidth, etc., user acceptance of mobile applications strongly depends on the application adaptation to the concrete usage context. This article presents a framework for mobile applications in tourism, enabling a flexible implementation of adaptive, context-aware tourism applications. The framework especially provides approaches for user interface adaptation, content adaptation (recommendation), and interaction modality adaptation. The framework has been prototypically instantiated and evaluated in two different application scenarios, a city guide for the city of Innsbruck and a skiing guide for the ski resort DolomitiSuperski. Both application scenarios showed high usage rates and customer satisfaction and proved the applicability and effectiveness of the presented approach for developing adaptive mobile tourism applications.

Key words: Mobile applications; Ubiquitous computing; Adaptive systems; Context-aware systems; Personalization

Address correspondence to Wolfram Höpken, Hochschule Ravensburg-Weingarten, Doggenriedstr., 88250 Weingarten, Germany. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it