Tourism Culture & Communication 10(3) Abstracts

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Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 10, pp. 187–200
1098-304X/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830410X12910355180865
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

From Passenger to Driver: Creativity and Culture in Rural Communities

Patrick Mitchell* and Ron Fisher†

*School of Education and Professional Studies, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Australia
†Centre for Tourism, Sport and Service Innovation, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Australia

This study examines the activities of an arts group in a small rural town in Australia through the lens of the Creative Industries paradigm. The aim of the study is to gain deeper understanding of the potential of arts activities to impact on a community. The study evaluates how future growth of the arts in such communities may be augmented by use of the paradigm supported by a branding approach based on creativity and innovation. The research uses in-depth interviews of volunteers and other key actors in a rural arts festival. Findings suggest that the Creative Industries paradigm provides a framework that supports and develops the work of community art in rural communities. The paradigm also supports the development of a branding strategy based on creativity and innovation.

Key words: The arts; Creative industries; Tourism

Address correspondence to Ron Fisher, Centre for Tourism, Sport and Service Innovation, Griffith Business School, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University QLD 4222, Australia. Tel: +617 55529022; Fax: +617 55529206; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 10, pp. 201–216
1098-304X/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830410X12910355180900
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Reciprocal Relationship Between Corporate and Regional Brands in the Creative Industries: The Case of Sustainable Architecture in Portland, Oregon, USA

Ian Parkman

Sellinger School of Business, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD, USA

While the creative industries have emerged as an increasingly important domain for research, very little is known about the organization-level elements that may drive firm success. Using a case study approach, this article provides evidence for a complex reciprocal relationship between the destination brand of Portland, Oregon, USA and the firms within the sector based on a distinctive “terroir” for sustainable architecture. Findings examine how architecture firms within the sector employ aspects of corporate identity, image, and reputation to endow their corporate brands with authenticity, which has been shown to be the essential feature of their appeal to customers. The article bolsters extant claims that the concept of authenticity offers significant marketing advantage to firms in the creative industries context. The article provides preliminary evidence for a new conceptualization of authenticity for creative and knowledge-intensive organizations based on seven aspects of corporate image and identity: 1) Appearing above commercial considerations, 2) Production methods as a craft, 3) Valuing internal satisfaction, 4) Formal and informal classifications, 5) Aura of place, 6) Corporate visual identity, and 7) Peer acclaim and awards/competitions.

Key words: Creative industries; Corporate identity; Corporate branding; Authenticity

Address correspondence to Ian Parkman, Assistant Professor of Marketing, Sellinger School of Business, Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21210, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 10, pp. 217–230
1098-304X/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830410X129103555180946
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Exploring Urban Creativity: Visitor Experiences of Spitalfields, London

Ilaria Pappalepore, Robert Maitland, and Andrew Smith

The Centre for Tourism Research, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, University of Westminster, London, UK

This article critically examines visitor experiences of a creative urban area, to help explore the relationships between creative industries, consumption, and the development of urban tourism. After reviewing available literature on creative areas and their appeal for emerging types of contemporary tourists, the article concentrates on one creative area in London: Spitalfields. Drawing on 50 semistructured interviews conducted with visitors between November 2007 and March 2008, the article explores the role of the creative industries in developing urban tourism, via an analysis of visitors’ perceptions, experiences, and characteristics, as well as the tangible and intangible qualities of an emerging tourism area. The findings suggest that Spitalfields is an established off the-beaten-track destination that is starting to attract more mainstream tourists with the consequent departure of some groups of visitors. “Atmosphere” appears to be crucial to the visitor experience and is created by a number of elements including independent shops, a high number of young artists, new fashions, and cultural diversity. All these elements contribute to make the area seem distinctive, but at the same time “typically London.” The findings shed light on the complexity of the tourist experience, interrogating some key concepts such as atmosphere, perceived authenticity, and new forms of cultural capital in the context of a creative urban area.

Key words: Visitor experience; Creative areas; Atmosphere; Gentrification; London

Address correspondence to Ilaria Pappalepore, The Centre for Tourism Research, School of Architecture and the Built Environment, University of Westminster, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 207 911 5000; Fax: +44 (0) 207 911 5171; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 10, pp. 231–245
1098-304X/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830410X12910355180982
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Creating High and Low Art: Experimentation and Commercialization at Fringe Festivals

Elspeth A. Frew* and Jane Ali-Knight†

*School of Management, La Trobe University, Victoria, Australia
†Edinburgh Institute for Festival and Event Management, The Business School, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK

Fringe festivals make an important contribution to the creative industries by providing artistic output and experiences. Fringe festivals are open access noncurated multi-art festivals where artist choose to present their work. The article considers the phenomenon of fringe festivals in the context of creative industries and, in particular discusses the issue of commercialization at two such festivals, namely the Edinburgh Festival Fringe and the Adelaide Fringe Festival. Both fringe festival organizations have been criticized as staging festivals that have become overly commercial and less experimental. The study found that this criticism has occurred because venues and promoters, particularly in relation to comedy shows, aggressively market the artists they support. However, both fringe festivals have maintained their original philosophy of open access to allow all artists and a range of art forms to be staged. A new definition of a fringe festival is provided, and future areas of research are identified.

Key words: Fringe; Festival; Commercialization; Creative industries; Edinburgh; Adelaide

Address correspondence to Dr. Elspeth A. Frew, School of Management, La Trobe University, Bundoora 3086, Victoria, Australia. Tel: +61 3 9479 2333; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 10, pp. 247–263
1098-304X/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/109830410X12910355181026
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Social Identity and Indie Music: Me or We?

Julia Chan* and Rosemary Polegato†

*EVENKO (l’Arena des Canadiens), Montreal, Quebec, Canada
†Department of Commerce, The Ron Joyce Centre for Business Studies, Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of social identity on the consumption of Canadian Indie music. Data collected in 2008 with a self-completion questionnaire comprised of measures of social identification, values, opinion leadership, and consumption behavior for Indie music were used to address four research questions. Strong identifiers with Indie music (SIs), compared to weak identifiers (WIs), were found to have a stronger association of the music with four specific values, to differ in their opinion leadership behavior, and to differ in more than half of the consumption patterns studied. Implications of the findings for musicians and promoters are suggested.

Key words: Social identity; Indie music; Consumer behavior

Address correspondence to Rosemary Polegato, M.B.A., Ph.D., Department of Commerce, The Ron Joyce Centre for Business Studies, Mount Allison University, 144 Main Street, Sackville, NB E4L 3R6, Canada. Tel: (506) 364-2322; Fax: (506) 364-2625; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it