Tourism in Marine Environments 6(4) Abstracts

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Tourism in Marine Environments, Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 145–160
1544-273X/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427310X12764412618966
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

CCN: Towards a Model of Comfort, Constraints, and Negotiation in Recreational Scuba Diving

Kay Dimmock

Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW, Australia

Scuba diving has become a popular form of marine-based tourism and adventure activity. Yet, little empirical information details what transpires during an encounter once a diver descends from the surface. Using a qualitative methodology, the stories of scuba diving experiences were collected and examined in an effort to define some of the prevailing features of an underwater encounter. The presence of comfort, constraint, and negotiation (CNN) emerged as important features of scuba diving. Titled CCN, this article offers a conceptual model that presents the central concepts and depicts the association between comfort, constraints, and negotiation during scuba diving as dynamic elements of the activity.

Key words: Scuba diving; Comfort; Constraint; Negotiation; Experience

Address correspondence to Kay Dimmock, Ph.D., School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, P.O. Box 157, Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia. Tel: (+61 2) 6620 3981; Fax: (+61 2) 6622 2208; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism in Marine Environments, Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 161–174
1544-273X/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427310X12764412619000
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Swedish Recreational Fishing Industry

Anton Paulrud*† and Staffan Waldo†

*Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden
†AgriFood Economics Centre, Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lund, Sweden

In the wake of the crisis for commercial fisheries, the possibility to support and develop economic activity from recreational fishing has gained increased political interest in Sweden. Promoting management actions that facilitate development of the industry requires knowledge about the current structure of the industry and companies’ views regarding future challenges. We address these topics using data from a mail survey sent to companies that derive at least part of their income from the Swedish recreational fishing industry. In total, the survey estimates that Sweden has approximately 1,300 companies in the industry with total revenues of 500 million SEK (€1 ≈ SEK 9). The primary services provided by these companies include food and accommodation, guiding, boats, and access to fishing sites. A majority (about 55%) of the companies expect revenues to increase over the next 3 years, but still face a number of challenges to continued future development. Most significant are high labor costs, lack of large specimens of fish, lack of fish, marketing, and obtaining bank loans. The most preferred management actions were help with marketing and improved fisheries management.

Key words: Sport fishing; Angling; Tourism; Survey; Supply; Company; Entrepreneurs; Management

Address correspondence to Anton Paulrud, Department of Forest Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden. Tel: +46 (0) 70 646 6808; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism in Marine Environments, Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 175–183
1544-273X/10 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427310X12764412619046
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourist Attitudes Towards Marine Mammal Tourism: An Example From the Dominican Republic

Megan Draheim,* Idelisa Bonnelly,† Toby Bloom,‡ Naomi Rose,‡ and E. C. M. Parsons*§

*Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA
†Proyecto Amigos de los Delfines, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
‡Humane Society International, Washington, DC, USA
§University Marine Biological Station Millport, University of London, Cumbrae, Scotland

In 2002, residents of the village of Bayahibe, Dominican Republic, became concerned about their local dolphin population when eight bottlenose dolphins were captured for a Dominican dolphinarium off the coast of their village within a national park. Subsequently, a collaborative project, El Proyecto Amigos de los Delfines, was established to learn more about this dolphin population and to initiate conservation efforts in the region. In 2007, a survey of tourists in Bayahibe was conducted to assess the degree of interest in local sustainable marine mammal tourism. The results indicated that tourists in this area had a high concern for dolphin conservation and would rather see wild than captive dolphins. Respondents also expressed support for sustainable (vs. conventional) tourism practices.

Key words: Dominican Republic; Dolphins; Whale watching; Sustainable marine mammal tourism

Address correspondence to Megan Draheim, Department of Environmental Science and Policy, George Mason University, MSN 5F2, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it