Tourism Analyis 16(2) Abstracts

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Tourism Analysis, Vol. 16, pp. 105–120
1083-5423/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354211X13014081270206
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Youth Tourism in Africa: Evidence From South Africa

Christian M. Rogerson

School of Tourism and Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

Youth tourism is one of the most dynamic elements of the global tourism economy. Key drivers of youth tourism are the segments of backpacking and volunteer tourism. Against the backdrop of international writings on youth tourism—especially of backpacker and volunteer tourism—this article reviews evidence from South Africa, as an example of an emerging destination for youth tourism in Africa. It is argued that the expanding youth tourism economy of South Africa provides opportunities for developing a more responsible tourism as well as for expanding local pro-poor development impacts of the tourism economy.

Key words: Tourism development; Youth tourism; Backpacking; Volunteer tourism; South Africa

Address correspondence to Christian M. Rogerson, Professor, School of Tourism and Hospitality, Faculty of Management, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 16, pp. 121–135
1083-5423/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354211X13014081270288
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

An Assessment of Hotel Product Quality in Kenya as a Basis for Building Destination Competitiveness

Joe Kibuye Wadawi,* Nerine C. Bresler,† and Frikkie J. Herbst‡

*School of Hospitality and Tourism, Strathmore University, Nairobi, Kenya
†Tourism Management, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
‡The University of Stellenbosch Business School, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Developing countries such as Kenya and other African countries now consider tourism as a passport for development as it does not need expensive investment to initiate and operate as a national business. This study was motivated by the need to create parameters that can elevate the competitiveness of a tourist destination. The purpose was to initiate the formulation of a structured, integrated conceptual framework for hotel product/service, quality based on the normative quality expectation of the tourists and Hotel Operators’ strategic quality designs. Descriptive qualitative research design was used to establish the secondary objectives and to assess the five propositions that were developed for the study. Tourists and hotel operators in two major tourist provinces of Kenya were used to obtain information regarding normative and perceptive hotel product/service quality. Destination marketing managers employed by the only destination marketing organization, Kenya Tourist Board (KTB), were also surveyed to provide insight on Kenya’s destination marketing strategies. The study found that hotel operators and other destination management organizations neither share nor operate on a common vision as they endeavor to build destination competitiveness for Kenya. An integrated framework that may be utilized to build destination competitiveness so that the economic potential of tourism is maximized in Kenya is therefore proposed.

Key words: Destination marketing; Competitiveness; Kenya tourism; Hotel product/service quality

Address correspondence to Joe Kibuye Wadawi, Dean, Strathmore School of Tourism and Hospitality, Strathmore University, Nairobi, Kenya. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 16, pp. 137–156
1083-5423/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354211X13014081270323
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Role of Transport and Accommodation Infrastructure in the Development of Eco/Nature Tourism in Cameroon

Albert Kimbu

Law and Social Sciences, Nottingham Trent University Graduate School Business, Nottingham, UK

This article investigates the significance and importance of transport and other service or nontransport (accommodation) infrastructure as important factors in the development of Cameroon as a future competitive eco/nature tourism destination. Based on the results of primary data collected in Cameroon, the article examines and sheds light on the evolution in Cameroon’s service infrastructure since independence in 1960 with particular emphasis on the transport and accommodation infrastructure into and within Cameroon’s natural parks, reserves, and other tourist attractions. Through an analysis of a tourist satisfaction survey, field observations, and discussions with tour operators, the article points out the sensitivity of tourists visiting the country to the service infrastructure especially with regards to the transport and accommodation infrastructure and how these services impacted on their general holiday experience and the image it portrays of Cameroon—an eco/nature tourism holiday destination. It also examines the current state of the transport system and infrastructure both into and within the country as well as its accommodation infrastructure, and in the process highlights shortcomings that are to be found in Cameroon’s transport and other service infrastructure. The concluding section of the article proposes a way forward in alleviating some of the concerns raised after analyzing data from the survey, discussions, and field observation. Recommendations that should be taken into consideration by all stakeholders responsible for the conception, development, and implementation of policies dealing with transport, accommodation, and other service infrastructure to and within sites that attract tourists, nature lovers in particular, and Cameroon in general, thereby enhancing the image of the country as a favorable eco/nature tourism destination are proposed.

Key words: Cameroon; Ecotourism; Accommodation; Transport; Destination image

Address correspondence to Dr. Albert Kimbu at his current address: School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, UK. Tel: (+44) (0)1483 68 96 53; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 16, pp. 157–168
1083-5423/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354211X13014081270369
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourism Trends in Ghana: The Accommodation Sector

Joseph Mensah-Ansah, Emma Martin, and David Egan

Shaffield Business School, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK

Tourism in Ghana has become a major socioeconomic activity and one of the most important and fastest growing sectors of the Ghanaian economy. It is the fourth largest foreign exchange earner after cocoa, gold, and remittances from abroad. Ghana’s tourism growth rate is about 12% per annum. Hence, the importance of tourism and its sociocultural, political, and economic values to Ghana is enormous. The tourism industry has over the years demonstrated its ability to contribute significantly towards national economic development, especially in the areas of employment generation, wealth creation, and poverty reduction at national and community levels. Since independence in 1957, a number of tourism development plans has been drawn up to guide the growth of the industry. Unfortunately, none of these plans has been fully implemented due to unfavorable economic and political environment. Although most sections of Ghana’s tourism development plans since independence have not been fully implemented, the tourism sector in Ghana has seen substantial growth. The government is determined to reap the full benefits that the industry offers by putting in place necessary plans, policies, actions, and resources to stimulate guided growth in the sector and ensure that tourism does not become a missed opportunity. This article gives an overview of tourism in Ghana; in particular, the demand and supply trends in the accommodation sector. It also examines the contribution of the accommodation sector to the Ghanaian economy.

Key words: Tourism trends; Ghana; Accommodations; Tourism development

Address correspondence to Joseph Mensah-Ansah, 41 Park Walk, Castle Court, Sheffield, S2 5JE, UK. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 16, pp. 169–185
1083-5423/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354211X13014081270404
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Heritage Tourism in Africa: Residents’ Perceptions of African-American and White Tourists

Victor Teye,* Ercan (Sirakaya) Turk,† and Sevil Sönmez‡

*Business School, Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA), Accra, Ghana
†School of Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA
‡Recreation, Tourism, and Hospitality Management, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC, USA

The growing interest in heritage tourism in Africa is reflected in the Cairo Declaration of 1995, which was adopted under the auspices of the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). The objective was for African countries to identify, develop, and preserve a number of World Heritage Sites in cooperation with international agencies and special interest groups. Ultimately, it was expected that such development would enhance the promotion of cultural, thus heritage and ethnic tourism as part of the continent’s economic development strategy. A number of forts and castles built by Europeans are currently being restored for heritage tourism in Ghana and the country also has several vital cultural resource sites that are critical components of the “Slave Route Project.” Cape Coast and Elmina are two communities in Ghana currently receiving an increasing number of international visitors, including a significant number of African-Americans to the three World Heritage Sites located in the two towns. The purpose of the article is to examine how residents of Cape Coast and Elmina perceive African-American and White tourists. Data for the study were gathered in Cape Coast and Elmina through interviewer-administered surveys. Results indicate significant differences in residents’ perceptions of Black and White visitors. The study concludes that considerable care must be exercised in the development and utilization of historically sensitive areas and properties for tourism.

Key words: Residents’ perceptions; Heritage tourism; African-Americans; Diaspora

Address correspondence to Victor Teye, Professor, Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration, P.O. Box AH 50, Achimota, Accra, Ghana. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 16, pp. 187–202
1083-5423/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354211X13014081270440
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

For What Stands the “B” in the CBT Concept: Community-Based or Community-Biased Tourism? Some Insights From Namibia

Renaud Lapeyre

School of Geography, Archaeology, and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Since the middle of the 1990s, the Namibian government has tried to tackle land and socioeconomic inequalities prevailing in the country. In this regard, rural communities, registered as communal conservancies, were granted new rights over wildlife and tourism resources. As a result, these communities were able to start operating tourism ventures in rural areas and benefit from associated revenues generated. In this process, these were in addition strongly technically and financially assisted by donors and NGOs. Nevertheless, in this article we argue that tourism benefits delivered so far at the local level have proved quite limited. Two reasons could explain this situation. First, rural communities and supporting NGOs lack minimum capacity and skills to efficiently manage tourism businesses. Second, the tourism sector is best characterized as a very competitive global commodity chain (GCC), where economic power lies in tour operators’ hands and thus where rural communities can only capture a marginal share.

Key words: Community-based tourism; Namibia; NGOs; Wildlife tourism

Address correspondence to Renaud Lapeyre, School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 16, pp. 203–210
1083-5423/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354211X13014081270486
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Revisiting Botswana’s High-Value, Low-Volume Tourism

Lefatshe I. Magole and Lapologang Magole

University of Botswana, Maun, Botswana

Botswana has adopted a high-value, low-volume tourism strategy in a bid to minimize negative environmental impacts on pristine wildlife areas while maximizing socioeconomic benefits. This implies sustainable development/tourism. While conservation of biological diversity appears to be on course, visitation and hence revenue has remained stunted in most parks and reserves. Moreover, the high-value, low-volume tourism strategy appears to have contributed towards enclave tourism, with a large foreign ownership of tour operator companies and repatriation of profits from Botswana. This compromises yet another principle of sustainability, social equity. It would appear that the high-value, low-volume tourism strategy is antisustainability and hence not suitable for a developing country like Botswana with a large rural population that is still highly dependent on natural resources. This article utilizes secondary data to evaluate the effectiveness of the high-value, low-volume strategy in achieving sustainable tourism development in Botswana.

Key words: Tourism policy; High-value, low-volume tourism strategy; Sustainable tourism development; Protected area management; Enclave tourism; Environmental conservation

Address correspondence to Lefatsche Innocent Magole, Tourism Specialist, University of Botswana, Private Bag 285, Maun, Botswana. Tel: 267 6817273; Fax: 276 6864139; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it