Cell Medicine 2(1) Abstracts

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Cell Medicine, Part B of Cell Transplantation, Vol. 2, pp. 1–8, 2011
2155-1790/11 $90.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/215517911X575975
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Review

Prospects for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes in Cell Therapy1

Masaya Iwamuro,* Javed M. Shahid,† Kazuhide Yamamoto,* and Naoya Kobayashi†

*Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan
†Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Transplant and Surgical Oncology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan

Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, first established in 2006, have the same characteristics of self-renewability and pluripotency as embryonic stem (ES) cells. iPS cells are inducible from patient-specific somatic cells; therefore, they hold significant advantages for overcoming immunological rejection as well as the ethical issues associated with the derivation of ES cells from embryos. Generation of patient-derived hepatocytes by iPS technology and their use in cell transplantation therapy for patients with liver disease is quite attractive. Here, we discuss recent advances and challenges in hepatocyte differentiation from iPS cells and their utility in cell therapy.

Key words: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells; Hepatic differentiation; Hepatocytes

1This article is an advanced publication of a manuscript submitted for the JSOPMB issue to be published later this year.
Address correspondence to Masaya Iwamuro, M.D., Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Kita-Ku, Okayama 700-8558, Japan. Tel: +81-86-235-7219; Fax: +81-86-225-5991; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Medicine, Part B of Cell Transplantation, Vol. 2, pp. 9–25, 2011
2155-1790/11 $90.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/215517911X575993
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Review

Management of Liver Failure: From Transplantation to Cell-Based Therapy

Maria Giovanna Francipane,*† Melchiorre Cervello,* Giovanni Battista Vizzini,‡ Giada Pietrosi,‡ and Giuseppe Montalto†

*Institute of Biomedicine and Molecular Immunology “Alberto Monroy,” National Research Council (CNR), Palermo, Italy
†Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy
‡Istituto Mediterraneo Trapianti e Terapie ad Alta Specializzazione, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Italy, Palermo, Italy

The severe shortage of deceased donor organs has driven a search for alternative methods of treating liver failure. In this context, cell-based regenerative medicine is emerging as a promising interdisciplinary field of tissue repair and restoration, able to contribute to improving health in a minimally invasive fashion. Several cell types have allowed long-term survival in experimental models of liver injury, but their therapeutic potential in humans should be regarded with deep caution, because few clinical trials are currently available and the number of patients enrolled so far is too small to assess benefits versus risks. This review summarizes the current literature on the physiological role of endogenous stem cells in liver regeneration and on the therapeutic benefits of exogenous stem cell administration with specific emphasis on the potential clinical uses of mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, critical points that still need clarification, such as the exact identity of the stem-like cell population exerting the beneficial effects, as well as the limitations of stem cell-based therapies, are discussed.

Key words: Intrahepatic stem cells; Endothelial progenitor cells; Fetal liver stem cells; Induced pluripotent stem cells; Bone marrow-derived stem cells; Mesenchymal stem cells

Address correspondence to Giuseppe Montalto, Department of Internal Medicine and Specialties, University of Palermo, Via del Vespro 141, 90127 Palermo, Italy. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Medicine, Part B of Cell Transplantation, Vol. 2, pp. 27–41, 2011
2155-1790/11 $90.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/215517911X575984
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Upregulation of Adipogenesis and Chondrogenesis in MSC Serum-Free Culture

Saey Tuan Barnabas Ho,* Vivek Madhukar Tanavde,† James Hoi Hui,* and Eng Hin Lee*

*Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine and NUS Tissue Engineering Program, National University of Singapore, 119074 Singapore
†Bioinformatics Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research, 138671 Singapore

Serum-free media have been shown to be effective in the expansion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, the effects may go beyond cell expansion as the differentiation potentials of the cells may be modified, thus influencing their efficacy for downstream applications. The latter is poorly understood, and this has prompted an evaluation of the influence of a serum-free formulation on the chondrogenic, adipogenic, and osteogenic potential of MSCs. The media consisted of KnockoutTM Serum Replacement (KSR) with a cocktail of growth factors coupled with either collagen or fibronectin coatings. Collagen coating was selected as it promoted consistent cellular attachment. When compared against fetal bovine serum (FBS) controls, cell proliferation in the serum-free media was enhanced at passage 1. Similar levels of surface markers were observed in the two groups with a slight reduction in CD90 and CD73 in the serum-free culture at passage 3. The cultures were screened under differentiation conditions and a better maintenance of the chondrogenic potential was noted in the serum-free media with higher expressions of glycoaminoglycans (GAGs) and collagen II. Chondrogenesis was deficient in the FBS group and this was attributed to the inherent inconsistency of animal serum. Adipogenesis was enhanced in the serum-free group with a higher PPARG expression and lipid accumulation. Similar levels of osteogenic mineralization was noted in the FBS and serum-free groups but collagen I gene expression was suppressed in the latter. This was initially observed during expansion. These observations were attributed to the signaling cascades triggered by the cytokines presented in the serum-free formulation and the interaction with the collagen substrate. The serum-free media helps to maintain and enhance the chondrogenic and adipogenic potentials of the MSCs, respectively. This advantage can be exploited for therapeutic applications in cartilage and adipose tissue engineering.

Key words: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); Serum-free media; Chondrogenesis; Adipogenesis

Address correspondence to Eng Hin Lee, Division of Graduate Medical Studies, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, NUS MD 5, Level 3, 12 Medical Drive, Singapore 117598. Tel: (65)-65166576; Fax: (65)-67731462; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it