Event Management 15(2) Abstracts

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Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 105–119
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13082349958316
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Intercommunity Sport Events: Vehicles and Catalysts for Social Capital in Divided Societies

Nico Schulenkorf, Alana Thomson, And Katie Schlenker

School of Leisure, Sport and Tourism, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Sydney, Australia

Sport events are believed to promote dialogue, integration, and peaceful understanding among disparate groups, even when other forms of negotiation have not been successful. However, the social outcomes from sport events are largely anecdotal and there is a need to empirically examine the active engagement of groups with “others” in participatory sport event projects. This article investigates the potential of an intercommunity sport event in contributing to intergroup development and social capital building in the ethnically divided Sri Lanka. It follows an interpretive mode of inquiry where findings are derived from the analysis of 35 in-depth interviews with Sinhalese, Tamil, Muslim, and international event stakeholders. By providing evidence of the varying sociocultural experiences at the event, this article discusses the event’s impact on intergroup relations and its influence on the stock of social capital available to communities. Findings can assist governments, policy makers, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in advancing policies and practical measures that build on events as vehicles and catalysts for enhanced intergroup relations and the creation of social capital.

Key words: Sport event experiences; Community participation; Intergroup relations; Social capital; Strategic management

Address correspondence to Dr. Nico Schulenkorf, School of Leisure, Sport and Tourism, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), Sydney, Australia, P.O. Box 222, Lindfield 2070, NSW, Australia. Tel: +61 295145368; Fax: +61 295145195; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 121–136
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13082349958118
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tao Residents’ Perceptions of Social and Cultural Impacts of Tourism in Lan-Yu, Taiwan

Kenneth F. Backman, Cheng-Hsuan Hsu, and Sheila J. Backman

Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA

Tourism, often referred to as the world’s largest industry, impacts the residents of local communities. Festivals and events are often used as tools of tourism development by local governments. However, prior to developing a new festival, the first step is to conduct an assessment of how locals perceive the current level of social and cultural impacts in a community. This study examined the perceived social and cultural impacts of tourism development in Lan-Yu, Taiwan. The findings suggest that the local residents support tourism. Further this would be an appropriate location to develop a cultural festival.

Key words: Tourism impacts; Festival development

Address correspondence to Kenneth F. Backman, Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, Clemson University, 288 Lehotsky Hall, Clemson, SC 29634-0735, USA. Tel: 864-656-2204; Fax: 864-656-2222; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 137–149
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13082349958154
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Economic Effects of Cultural Events: The Pintoricchio Exhibition in Perugia

Bruno Bracalente,* Cecilia Chirieleison,† Massimo Cossignani,* Luca Ferrucci,† Marina Gigliotti,† and M. Giovanna Ranalli*

*Department of Economics, Finance, and Statistic, Perugia University, Perugia, Italy
†Department of Business and Law, Perugia University, Perugia, Italy

The first objective of this article is to describe a methodological approach for the assessment of the economic effects of cultural and entertainment events on a local economy. Through choosing the components of the expenditure and the impact analysis model, the proposed approach represents an advanced synthesis of the path developed in the literature. The second objective of this case study is to offer the policy makers useful information for public policies. The Pintoricchio Exhibition, held in Perugia, Italy, from February 2 to August 31, 2008, is the event analyzed.

Key words: Economic impact; Cultural events; Input–output model; Pintoricchio Exhibition

Address correspondence to Marina Gigliotti, Assistant Professor, Perugia University, Department of Business and Law, Via Pascoli, 20'06123 Perugia, Italy. Tel: +390755855265; Fax: +390755855274; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 151–161
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13082349958190
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

A Taste of Tourism: Visitors’ Motivations to Attend a Food Festival

Wanching Chang

Department of Nutrition, Hospital, and Retailing, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, USA

Food festivals can offer a whole host of sensory experiences for visitors while engaging with a destination and its people. Understanding visitors’ motivations to attend a specific food festival is beneficial for both community developers and festival professionals when implementing an effective marketing strategy in order to promote the event. This study applied a festival motivation framework incorporating three interacting components as the foundation to study food festival motives. The factor analysis results revealed six delineated motivational dimensions of visitors attending a regional food festival in Texas. Findings indicated patrons attended the food festival for generic leisure and travel needs, event-specific experiences, and extrinsic motives. Marketing
implications are discussed along with the findings.

Key words: Food festivals; Festival motivation framework; Visitors’ motivations

Address correspondence to Wanching Chang, Department of Nutrition, Hospitality, and Retailing, Texas Tech University, Box 41240, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 163–177
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13082349958235
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Impact of Past Experience on Perceived Value, Overall Satisfaction, and Destination Loyalty: A Comparison Between Visitor and Resident Attendees of a Festival

Jinyang Deng and Chad Pierskalla

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Resources Program, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA

This study examines the similarities and differences of the impact past experience has on perceived value, overall satisfaction, and destination loyalty between two groups: visitors and residents who attended the 2008 National Cherry Blossom Festival (NCBF). Data were collected using the convenience sampling method and analyzed using factor analysis, t-tests, and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results indicate that there were major distinctions between first-time and repeat visitors with the latter being more positive than the former in their perception of social and emotional values of the festival, more satisfied with and more loyal to the festival than the former. However, first-time and repeat residents did not differ significantly from each other. In addition, first-time visitors were found to be consistently different from repeat visitors, first-time and repeat residents in perceived value, satisfaction, and destination loyalty while repeat visitors did not differ significantly from first-time and repeat residents. This study also found that overall satisfaction mediates the effect of the perceived value on destination loyalty for the visitor group, regardless of past experience. However, for the resident group, the mediation effect is present for repeat residents, but not for first-time residents. Research implications and future research needs are also discussed.

Key words: Cherry blossom; Festival; Visitors; Residents; Satisfaction

Address correspondence to Jinyang Deng, West Virginia University, 325 B Percival Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506, USA. Tel: (304) 293-6818; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 179–195
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13082349958271
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

New Investment: An Exploratory Case Study of Three Mature Edinburgh Festivals and Their Future Funding Opportunities

Kuan-Wen Lin,* Patrick Stein,†‡§ and Joe Goldblatt*

*International Centre for the Study of Planned Events, Queen Margaret University, East Lothian, Scotland, UK
†Free University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany
‡Fachhochschule fu¨r Oekonomie & Management (FOM), Berlin University of Applied Sciences, Berlin, Germany
§PricewaterhouseCoopers, Berlin, Germany

This article examines how festival holding organizations (FHOs) may identify emerging sources of alternative financing from banks, venture capitalists, and venture philanthropic organizations. The research includes both quantitative analysis of 10 years of economic data from festivals in Edinburgh, Scotland and qualitative interviews with a leader in both the banking and cultural community. The research concludes that there is a growing need for FHOs to identify new sources of funding beyond that historically provided by the public sector or earned income such as ticket sales and that a combination of banks, venture capital firms, and venture philanthropic organizations may provide valuable alternative funding sources in the future.

Key words: Festivals; Banks; Venture capital; Venture philanthropy; Commercial; Not for profit; Principal–Agent theory; Grants

Address correspondence to Kuan-wen Lin, International Centre for the Study of Planned Events, School of Arts, Social Science, and Management, Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Queen Margaret University Drive, Musselburgh, East Lothian, EH21 6UU, Scotland, UK. Tel: +44 (0)131 474 0000; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 197–211
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13082349958352
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Influence of Culture on Community Perceptions: The Case of Two South African Arts Festivals

E. Slabbert And M. Saayman

Institute for Tourism and Leisure Studies, North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

The purpose of this article is to analyze the influence of culture on the perceptions of the community regarding the impacts of events in two of the largest arts festivals in South Africa. The data were collected through structured questionnaires completed by community members during the 2007 and 2008 festivals. The samples [Grahamstown (2007), N = 264; Oudtshoorn (2008), N = 258] were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results indicated that there are differences between the cultural groups, although these are smaller than expected. Results also showed that the older the festival, the more immune the community becomes and the more tolerable. Added to this, the research revealed that a more focused measuring instrument is needed to determine in-depth cultural differences.

Key words: Arts festivals; Events; Community; Participation; Social impact; Klein Karoo National Arts Festival; Grahamstown National Arts Festival

Address correspondence to E. Slabbert, Institute for Tourism and Leisure Studies, North West University, Private Bag X6001, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa. Tel: +27 18 299 1806; Fax: +27 18 299 4140; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it