Event Management 15(3) Abstracts

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Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 215–232
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13124625650502
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Residents’ Support of Mega-Events: A Reexamination

Soyoung Boo,* Qijing Wang,† and Larry Yu*

*Department of Tourism and Hospital Management, School of Business, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA
†Department of Event Management, School of Tourism Management, Beijing International Studies University, Beijing, China

Residents’ perception is a commonly employed measure of locals’ support for mega-events. This present study suggests that more work is needed to explore residents’ perceptions of mega-events, and it extends the model related to locals’ support for mega-events, based on social exchange theory discussed in previous studies. This study proposes, and empirically validates, a theoretically structured approach to measure residents’ support, as well as its antecedents and its consequences, for the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games held in China. The results revealed that perceived preparedness is a significantly influential variable, but that perceived benefit is stronger in its effect. Our testing gives insight into a dynamic research approach to measure residents’ support for mega-events.

Key words: Residents’ perception; Perceived preparedness; Support for mega-events; The Beijing 2008 Olympic Games

Address correspondence to Soyoung Boo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Business, The George Washington University, Funger Hall, Suite 301s, 2201 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA. Tel: 202-994-6629; Fax: 202-994-1630; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 233–243
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13124625650539
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Event Attendance Motivation and Place Attachment: An Exploratory Study of Young Residents in Adelaide, South Australia

Eliza J. Hixson, S. Vivienne S. Mccabe, and Graham Brown

School of Management, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

This study aims to explore the effect of attending events on young residents’ place attachment levels. Events generate a wide range of social outcomes but it is not known whether they influence feelings towards the place where the event is held. After examining the motivations of event attendees, a survey of young residents in Adelaide, Australia found that there was no correlation between the events attended and place attachment. However, it was found that the motivations for event attendance did correlate with place identity. The other variable that was found to effect place identity was length of residence. The results indicate that these variables have a bearing on the effective bonds that develop between a person and a place, which in this case is the place of residence.

Key words: Event attendance; Place attachment; Young people; Motivations

Address correspondence to Eliza J. Hixson, School of Management, University of South Australia, Elton Mayo Building, GPO Box 2471, Adelaide SA 5001, Australia. Tel: +61 8 8302 7664; Fax: +61 8 8302 0512; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 245–266
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13124625650584
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Relationship Between Corporate Image and Purchase Behavior: Moderating Effects of Personal Characteristics and Situational Factors

Jun Woo Kim,* Brian Crow,† and Yu Kyoum Kim*

*Department of Sport Management, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA
†Department of Sport Management, Slippery Rock University, Slippery Rock, PA, USA

While previous research in the sponsorship context demonstrates a positive and direct relationship between corporate image and purchase intention, little empirical research considers moderator variables that fall within the realm of the corporate image and purchase behavior. Against this condition, the moderating impact of selected personal characteristics and situational factors on the corporate image-purchase behavior link was analyzed. As a result of the moderating tests, age, income, and awareness (i.e., consumers’ ability to recall and recognize the event sponsors) are found to be important moderators of the corporate image–purchase behavior link. From a managerial perspective, showing the moderating role of demographics and awareness of sponsorship activities, this study offers sponsorship and event managers an effective way to deal with sponsorship selection decision.

Key words: Event sponsorship; Corporate image; Moderator effects

Address correspondence to Jun Woo Kim, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Sport Management, Florida State University, Tully Gym B004, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA. Fax: (850)-644-0975; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 267–277
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13124625650629
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Event Attributes and the Structure of Satisfaction: A Case Study of Golf Spectators

Brian D. Krohn* and Sheila J. Backman†

*Department of Tourism, Conventions and Event Management, IU School of Physical Education and Tourism Management, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indianapolis, IN, USA
†Department of Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA

A tourist or event attendee’s satisfaction can be affected by the performance of a single attribute, especially if the experience is negative. In order to structure attributes in a way that is most beneficial to event or destination hosts, it is necessary to focus on those attributes that can be controlled and/or adjusted by the hosts. The purpose of this study was to examine multiple categorizations of attributes to determine which structure most closely represents the psychological representations present in the attendee’s minds and which of these categories has the most influence on overall event satisfaction. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to determine that the categorization of attributes by activity type was a best fit to the data. Activity type attribute categories of tournament specific, food/beverage, destination hospitality, transportation, and staff/information were revealed. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed to determine that tournament-specific attributes had the most influence on event satisfaction, followed by hospitality and staff/information attributes (standardized loadings of 0.371, 0.298, and 0.094, respectively). Results indicate that event-specific and hospitality attributes provide the most influence on satisfaction, but are not always in direct control of the event coordinator. Events should closely monitor attributes that are external to the event to ensure the highest level of spectator satisfaction.

Key words: Golf; Spectators; Satisfaction; Attributes

Address correspondence to Brian D. Krohn, Department of Tourism, Conventions, and Event Management, IU School of Physical Education and Tourism Management, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, 901 West New York Street, Office 258A, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. Tel: 317-274-7615; Fax: 317-278-2041; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 279–292
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13124625650656
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Are Media Reports Representative of Host Community Support for Mega-Events? The Case of Sydney World Youth Day 2008

Mirrin Locke and Anne Zahra

Department of Tourism and Hospitality, The University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

World Youth Day 2008 (WYD08) held during July was the fourth mega-event to be held in Sydney in the past decade. All mega-events, such as WYD08, attract considerable media attention in the lead up to, during, and after the event. In the lead up to WYD08, media reports, particularly those in the Australian written press, were predominately negative. These reports gave the impression that there was little, if any, support for holding the event among the residents of Sydney. Data were collected through a combination of document analysis and host community interviews, in the lead up to, during, and immediately following the event. The document analysis included two local Sydney newspapers and one national newspaper. The findings show that printed media reports were not an accurate reflection of community support. Given that media is believed to be not only influenced by public opinion, but also capable of influencing public opinion, why was there such disparity between media reports and other sources of evidence regarding community support for this event? There is a call for more research investigating if what is reflected in the media is a fair approximation of community response to events.

Key words: Mega-event; Media reporting; Media bias; Host community perceptions; Residents’ support

Address correspondence to Mirrin Locke, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Waikato Management School, The University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand. Tel: 64-7-838 4466, ext. 8244 or 64-21 952 331; Fax: 64-7-838 4331; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 15, pp. 293–303
1525-9951/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/152599511X13124625650700
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Assessing the Influences of Festival Quality and Satisfaction on Visitor Behavioral Intentions

Seon Mi Son* and Kyong Mo Lee†

*College of Hotel & Tourism, Chungwoon University, Chungnam, Korea
†College of Tourism Sciences, Kyonggi University, Konggi-do, Korea

It has been discussed in previous research that festival quality directly and positively affects behavioral intentions, whereas visitor satisfaction plays a mediating role between festival quality and behavioral intentions. The purpose of this study is to examine in greater detail the relationship between festival quality, satisfaction, and behavioral intentions in the context of both direct and indirect influence. Three hypotheses were proposed based on positive relationships among the variables. A total of 19 items were extracted, based on which a survey to measure the festival quality perceived by festival visitors was developed. Survey data were collected at a 3-day open-gate festival in Korea. Factor analysis was employed to condense the domains of festival quality, and regression analysis was conducted to verify the established hypotheses. Three festival quality factors of general features, comfort amenities, and socialization were identified. Accordingly, those factors were used to reveal the relationship among the variables. The results showed that the general features of festival quality most significantly affect satisfaction, recommendation, and revisit intention. This study provides some insights into the development of festival quality, and further explores the relationships between festival quality, satisfaction, and behavioral intention. And the implications of this research provide practitioners with particular attributes that can be managed to promote the success of a festival.

Key words: Festival quality; Visitor satisfaction; Behavioral intention

Address correspondence to Seon Mi Son, Ph.D., Lecturer, College of Hotel & Tourism, Majors of Tourism & Leisure Management, Chungwoon University, San29, Namjang-ri, Hongseong-eup, Hongseong-gun, Chungnam, Korea 350-701. Tel: 82-41-630-3207; Fax: 82-41-634-8700; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it