Tourism Review International 14(4) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 14, pp. 145–162
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427211X13092645879856
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Fit Theory as it Relates to Corporate Sponsorship of Charitable Events

Jooho Kim And Soyoung Boo

Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Business, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

Sponsor–event fit theory outlines the importance of the level of fit between sponsors and an event. In this present study, sponsor–event fit and other variables will be tested with multiple sponsors of a charitable event. The purpose of this present study is to investigate what affects sponsorship response in regard to charitable events by examining the sponsor–event fit theory. By reviewing the previous literature, hypotheses were developed and tested on 632 respondents employing a mall intercept method. The findings suggest that the sponsor–event fit is the most important variable affecting sponsorship response, and that it also can affect attitude toward sponsorship, which positively impacts sponsorship response as well.

Key words: Fit theory; Social sponsorship; Corporate social responsibilities (CSR); Charitable events

Address correspondence to Jooho Kim, MTA, Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Business, The George Washington University, Funger Hall, Suite 301s, 2201 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA. Tel: 202-994-6629; Fax: 202-994-1630; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 14, pp. 163–178
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427211X13092645879892
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Destination Brand Attitude and Loyalty as Factors in Revisitation of Competitive Destinations

Soyoung Boo

Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Business, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA

The role played by tourist behavior in the context of destination choice is still not entirely understood and calls for investigation into the significance of both tourist attitudes and loyalty in influencing whether a customer may repeatedly visit a destination. The objective of this article is to test a proposed relational model between destination brand attitude and destination brand loyalty, and to examine whether the model applies to specific competitive destinations in a same-destination-brand category. A series of analyses demonstrates that the relational model fits both tested destination categories well and additionally indicates that destination brand attitude does positively impact destination brand loyalty. However, the analyses also revealed that higher positive destination brand attitude does not necessarily lead to increased destination brand loyalty. The author explores the findings of this study in terms of its implications in issues of competition among repeat-visit destinations.

Key words: Destination brand attitude; Destination brand loyalty; Repeat visit destination; Spatial analysis

Address correspondence to Soyoung Boo, Ph.D., Department of Tourism and Hospitality Management, School of Business, The George Washington University, Funger Hall, Suite 301s, 2201 G Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052, USA. Tel: 202-994-6629; Fax: 202-994-1630; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 14, pp. 179–188
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427211X13092645879937
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Personal Heritage and Return Visits to American Colonies in Mexico

Dallen J. Timothy* and Kevin R. Schmidt†

*School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA
†Leisure Services Director, City of Santaquin, UT, USA

This article describes a case study of one Anglo-American village in Mexico that has become a salient personal heritage tourism destination for its émigrés and the descendents of its early pioneers. Several characteristics of personal heritage tourism are established and used to interpret the tourism situation in Colonia Juárez, Mexico, which involves varying elements of visiting friends and relatives, attending local celebrations, visiting cemeteries and doing genealogy research, undertaking religious activities, visiting historic sites, participating in ancestral livelihood activities, and developing a bond to the community. In addition, visitors’ perceptions of the potential for future tourism development are described, together with their perceived constraints to visiting the village.

Key words: Personal heritage tourism; Genealogy; Roots; Mexico; Return travel; Diaspora; Mormons; Immigrants

Address correspondence to Dallen J. Timothy, School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, PO Box 4020, 411 N. Central Ave, Suite 550, Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 14, pp. 189–199
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427211X13092645879973
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Hostelling as a Pathway to Cross-Cultural Understanding

Heather E. Bowen* and Margaret J. Daniels†

*The George Washington University School of Business, Washington, DC, USA
†School of Recreation, Health and Tourism, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA

Investigation regarding the specific contribution to global understanding made by tourism has been limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the experiential links between hostel stays and cross-cultural awareness. Sixty semistructured interviews were conducted with tourists staying at five hostels located in the northeastern US. Respondents represented fourteen different resident countries and offered feedback regarding trip patterns, perceptions about hostel lodging, connections with other cultures, and demographic items. Qualitative analyses resulted in four themes: the structure of the hostelling space, challenging preconceived notions, personal growth, and world perspective. Hostels were found to provide unique environmental conditions that promote equality and facilitate cross-cultural understanding.

Key words: Youth hostels; Cross-cultural awareness

Address correspondence to Heather E. Bowen, Ph.D., The George Washington University School of Business, 2201 G Street, NW, Suite 301, Washington, DC 20052, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 14, pp. 201–213
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427211X13092645880025
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Cooked Food Hawking and its Management: The Case of Singapore

Joan C. Henderson

Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

A case study of cooked food hawkers in Singapore is presented in this article, which also makes reference to activity in the wider Asian region and beyond. A model of cooked food hawking functions and attributes is devised and forms the analytical framework for the discussion of core characteristics and future prospects. The sector is shown to serve various purposes, including that of tourist amenity, and contributes to local lives and economies in the cities where activity is concentrated. At the same time, hawking poses challenges for authorities concerned about adverse impacts and traditional hawkers are at risk from modernization and globalization. The official approach to dealing with cooked food hawkers in Singapore is revealed to be distinctive regarding the level of intervention and control, reflecting the history and defining features of the city state. Nevertheless, some lessons can be learned from experiences there about the management of hawking in the 21st century, which include the importance of regulation and maintenance of food safety standards. A more general conclusion is that the contribution of cooked food hawkers should be given due recognition in urban planning and tourism marketing.

Key words: Cooked food hawking; Singapore; Southeast Asia

Address correspondence to Joan C. Henderson, Associate Professor, Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798. Tel: 65 6790 6116; Fax: 65 6791 3697; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it