Tourism in Marine Environments 7(2) Abstracts

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Tourism in Marine Environments, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 55–66
1544-273X/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427311X13038402065785
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Dive Market Segments and Destination Competitiveness: A Case Study of the Great Barrier Reef in View of Changing Reef Ecosystem Health

Anja Pabel* and Alexandra Coghlan†

*School of Business, James Cook University, Cairns, Qld, Australia
†International Centre for Ecotourism Research, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Qld, Australia

Understanding certified divers’ perceptions of their Great Barrier Reef (GBR) experience is important to ensure a high-quality dive tourism product. The study examined what dive trip attributes were important to divers and how different dive markets perceived the GBR’s environmental quality. The study borrows elements from the recreational specialization literature to explore differences in perceptions of the GBR between dive market segments. Results reveal that the more experienced “enthusiast” divers compared the GBR less favorably with regards to its environmental attributes, while “learners” were more favorable in their comparisons but also more concerned with the cost of their trip. The results suggest we consider marketing implications of changes in reef quality in light of a highly heterogeneous dive market.

Key words: Diving; Great Barrier Reef; Climate change; Environmental perceptions; Destination management

Address correspondence to Alexandra Coghlan, International Centre for Ecotourism Research, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Qld 4222, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism in Marine Environments, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 67–80
1544-273X/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427311X13038402065820
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Sex at Sea: Sexual Crimes Aboard Cruise Ships

Ross A. Klein* and Jill Poulston†

*School of Social Work, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada
†School of Hospitality and Tourism, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand

Incidents of sexual assault and sexual victimization are significantly more common on cruise ships than on land. Analysis of data from three major cruise lines, comprising more than 50% of the North American-based cruise industry, reveals that perpetrators are most often male crewmembers, victims are most often female passengers (over 17.5% younger than age 18), and that the assaults occur almost anywhere, though most frequently in passenger cabins. This article examines factors that may be related to the incidence of sexual assaults on cruise ships and concludes with a discussion of the steps cruise lines can take to address the problem.

Key words: Cruise ship; Cruise industry; Sexual assault; Sexual harassment; Rape

Address correspondence to Ross A. Klein, Professor of Social Work, School of Social Work, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s NL A1C 5S7, Canada. Tel: 709-747-2177; Fax: 709-737-2408; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism in Marine Environments, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 81–93
1544-273X/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/154427311X13038402065866
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Dolphin Watching in Muscat, Sultanate of Oman: Tourist Perceptions and Actual Current Practice

Louisa S. Ponnampalam*†‡

*Environment Society of Oman, Ruwi, Sultanate of Oman
†University Marine Biological Station Millport, Isle of Cumbrae, Scotland
‡Institute of Ocean and Earth Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Tourists who went dolphin watching in Muscat between December 2006 and June 2007 were asked to complete a questionnaire gauging the overall quality of their trips based on four main aspects: safety, educational value, perception of the boat driver’s behavior, and overall satisfaction. Results showed that most tourists were satisfied with their dolphin-watching trip and that the majority felt that the boat drivers maintained a good distance between the boat and the dolphins, yet most also expressed the view that official guidelines should be established and implemented. However, awareness levels of tourists regarding the existence of dolphin-watching guidelines were low and tourist perceptions of their trips contrasted with observed practices, which reveal the current industry standards in Muscat to be lacking in many respects. The contrast is discussed and recommendations made for raising industry standards.

Key words: Dolphin watching; Tourism; Perception; Guidelines; Muscat, Sultanate of Oman

Address correspondence to Louisa S. Ponnampalam, Institute of Ocean and Earth Sciences, C308, IPS Building, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Tel: 00 603 7967 4640; Fax: 00 603 7967 6994; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it