Tourism Review International 15(3) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 15, pp. 227–241
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427211X13216636845666
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Media Convergence: Tourist Attractions in the Making

Maria Månsson

Department of Service Management, Lund University/Campus Helsingborg, Helsingborg, Sweden

In the circuits of culture there are a multitude of representations in circulation. These representations are derived from a range of media products such as guidebooks and tourist brochures. Furthermore, these media products and representations continuously converge with each other. The question, then, is what representations are contained within these converged media products. This article, therefore, aims to explore representations in a range of media products associated with a tourist attraction. The selected site is Rosslyn Chapel outside of Edinburgh, known from The Da Vinci Code. The empirical material is analyzed using, first, a content analysis and, second, a narrative analysis. The combined analysis shows how popular cultural media products, through media convergence, have repositioned and created new representations, with a corollary effect on tourist attractions. Thus, media convergence will have a great impact on destination marketing, attractions and tourists alike because it legitimizes what is worth visiting.

Key words: Popular cultural media products; Convergence; Destination marketing; Representations; The Da Vinci Code

Address correspondence to Maria Månsson, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Service Management, Lund University/Campus Helsingborg, Box 882, SE-251 08 Helsingborg, Sweden. Tel: +46 4235 6653; Fax: +46 4235 6660; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 15, pp. 243–252
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427211X13216636845701
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Film Tourism Locations and Experiences: A Popular Korean Television Drama Production Perspective

Sangkyun Kim* and Noëlle O’Connor†

*Department of Tourism, School of Humanities, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia
†School of Business and Humanities, Limerick Institute of Technology, Moylish Park, Limerick, Ireland

The film tourism phenomenon remains relatively underresearched, namely the ways in which film tourism destinations and their associated tourist experiences are shaped, represented, and contextualized through the production and consumption of films or TV dramas. Daejanggeum (2003–2004) is a serialized historical Korean TV drama, which has been broadcast in over 60 countries, and its outdoor filming set, the Daejanggeum Theme Park, has become the most popular film tourism destination among international audience in South Korea. This article investigates how the production values of the program create, shape, contextualize, and symbolize audience viewing experiences and potential film tourism spaces and/or places. The primary data was collected through a series of qualitative semistructured personal interviews with six Korean TV drama production stakeholders. The findings suggest that the identified production values of TV drama production and consumption stem from five major dimensions, and each of those dimensions plays a different role in constructing and contextualizing audience’s viewing experiences and potential film tourism locations and experiences.

Key words: Film tourism; Television production and consumption; Daejanggeum; Production values; South Korea

Address correspondence to Dr. Sangkyun Kim, Lecturer in Tourism, Department of Tourism, School of Humanities, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia. Tel.: +61 (0) 8 8201 3039; Fax: +61 (0) 8 8201 3635; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 15, pp. 253–267
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427211X13216636845747
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Brunellopoli: A Wine Scandal Under the Tuscan Sun

Alessio Cavicchi* and Cristina Santini†

*Department of Studies on Economic Development, University of Macerata, Macerata, Italy
†Università Telematica San Raffaele Roma, Roma, Italy

The international success of Brunello wine has fostered economic growth in Montalcino, a small country village in Tuscany where Brunello is produced. In 2008, a scandal shocked the flourishing Montalcino wine-based economy when international press published rumors and news about fraudulent Brunello. This article focuses on the issue of crisis management in a local industry by exploring the dynamics of a wine scandal, the reactions of various people and organizations to press reports, and the potential impact of these press reports on tourism. Analysis of the data collected through in-depth interviews with 12 key informants has shed light on the role that media can have on shaping tourists’ expectations, depending on their degree of involvement and knowledge of wine. Some suggestions for practitioners are provided in order to increase the level of awareness of the consequences that poor crisis management can have on the whole economic system of a single product.

Key words: Brunello; News media; Key informant technique; Wine tourism; Crisis management

Address correspondence to Alessio Cavicchi, Department of Studies on Economic Development, University of Macerata, P.zza Oberdan, 3- 62100, Macerata, Italy. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 15, pp. 269–276
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427211X13216636845819
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

From Filmic Heritage to Long-Lasting Induced Tourism: The Singular Italian Case of the Once Unknown and Anonymous Brescello

Roberto C. Provenzano

IULM University, Milan, Italy

That film can induce viewers to visit a specific destination or to take into consideration a certain type of tourism (cultural, entertaining, or sportive, etc.) instead of another, is something that is widely agreed upon. However, there is still some doubt on how to consider this phenomenon: whether the effects produced by a film are limited due to the very short-term life of a film, or whether they can be made to last for a longer period, or even for an indefinite time. This article analyzes a singular Italian case that can illustrate some ways of how films can be exploited as a push factor by tourism bodies to promote tourism to an identifiable destination. It regards the long-lasting effects of a series of five old films of the 1950s that still produce a considerable effect on tourism in Brescello, a small and anonymous town on the Po River, in the north of Italy. It would never become a touristic destination had it not been for the fact that it was the location of those films.

Key words: Destination; Film tourism; Location; Push factor; Image

Address correspondence to Roberto C. Provenzano, IULM University, Milan, Italy. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 15, pp. 277–292
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427211X13216636845837
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Media-Induced Voluntourism in Yunnan, China

Jun Shao ,* Michelle Scarpino,† Yoonjung Lee,‡ and Ulrike Gretzel†

*College of Landscape Architecture, Beijing Forestry University, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences, Peking University, Peking, China
†Laboratory for Intelligent Systems in Tourism, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, Australia
‡Department for Recreation, Park and Tourism Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

Media-induced tourism as well as voluntourism are topics increasingly investigated in the tourism literature. However, a discussion of the intersection of these two forms of tourism (i.e., media-induced voluntourism) is currently missing from the literature. Using the example of two Chinese TV dramas, this article seeks to shed light on motivations and activities of media-induced voluntourists to the Chinese province of Yunnan. Based on a thematic analysis of online postings of the fans of these Chinese TV dramas, the article finds empirical evidence for media-induced voluntourism. The findings reveal that fans travel to Yunnan not only to engage in altruistic behavior, but also to inspect the volunteer work of other fans, as well as to receive recognition from the community. General tourism activities also play a role in their travels. The results indicate that fan voluntourism was strongly motivated by their empathy for the TV dramas’ characters and their desire to live the values promoted in these dramas.

Key words: Cyberfandom; TV drama; Volunteering; Motivations; Tourism

Address correspondence to Ulrike Gretzel, Laboratory for Intelligent Systems in Tourism, University of Wollongong, Northfields Ave., Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia. Tel: +61-2-4221-4823; Fax: +61-2-4221-4210; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 15, pp. 293–296
1544-2721/11 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427211X13216636845864
Copyright © 2011 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Is Film Tourism All the Same? Exploring Zhang Yimou’s Films’ Potential Influence on Tourism in China

Yuqun Ji* and Sue Beeton†

*Department of Tourism, Southeast University, Nanjing, P. R. China
†La Trobe Business School, La Trobe University, Australia

This article looks at the relationship between film, tourism, and the government of China by considering at the work of renowned Chinese film director, Zhang Yimou, and the ways in which his films have presented touristic images of China. His films have been seen in Western as well as Asian countries and provide a strong case study to examine the reality and potential of film tourism in China. Based on local cultural understanding, we propose a Product Development model for film tourism, which we plan to explore further and test empirically.

Key words: Film tourism; Film-induced tourism; China; Product development

Address correspondence to Sue Beeton, La Trobe Business School, La Trobe University, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it