Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research 36(3-4) Abstracts

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ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RES., INT. J., Vol. 36, pp. 221-230, 2011Copyright ©2011 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.

LOCALIZATION OF ACUPUNCTURE POINTS ON THE LUNG MERIDIAN USING BI-DIGITAL O-RING TEST ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD RESONANCE PHENOMENON BETWEEN 2 IDENTICAL SUBSTANCES

SUKO, E. V., M.D.(1)
Radiology Specialist.

IWASA, S., M.D., F.I.C.A.E, Cert. ORT-MD (4 Dan)(1)
Director of BMABDORT, Orthopedic Surgeon, private practice in São Paulo
Radiology Specialist

JOJIMA, T., M.D., F.I.C.A.E, Cert. ORT-MD (4 Dan)(1)
President of BMABDORT, Acupuncture Specialist, private practice in São Paulo

SENVAITIS, M. I., M.D.(1)
Acupuncture and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist, private practice in São Paulo

VERA, M.R., M.D.
Gynecology and obstetrics Specialist; Perinatologist; private practice in Santiago de Guayaquil, Ecuador.

UNO, L. H., M.D., M.S.(1), F.I.C.A.E, Cert. ORT-MD (1Dan)
Director of BMABDORT, Gynecology and Acupuncture Specialist, private practice in São Paulo

HONDA, M. I., M.D.(1)
Radiology and Acupuncture Specialist, private practice in São Paulo

FALZONI W., M.D. (1)
Chief of Cataract Department of Vide Ophthalmology Institution, Ophthalmology Specialist, private practice in São Paulo

YOSHIDA, Y., M.D. (1)
Ophthalmology and Acupuncture Specialist, private practice in São Paulo

BERRETA, O. N., M.D. (1)
Ophthalmology and Acupuncture Specialist, private practice in São Paulo

TANAKA, M. H., M.D. (1)
Ophthalmology and Acupuncture Specialist, private practice in São Paulo

ROSENBERG, M., M.D.
Acupuncture Specialist, private practice in São Paulo

SILVA, J. R., M.D., M.S.(1)
Infectious diseases and Psychotherapy Specialist, private practice in São Paulo
(1) Brazilian Medical Association of Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BMABDORT)

(Correspondence: Rua Joaquim Floriano 820, cjto 21, Itaim Bibi – Sao Paulo – SP –Brazil; CEP: 04534-003 Tel: (55)(11)3168-8500 e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )

(Received January 26, 2011; Accepted with Revisions November 25, 2011)

ABSTRACT:
Using Bi-Digital O-Ring Test electromagnetic field resonance phenomenon between 2 identical substances, it is possible to draw on the surface of the human body several points similar to the acupuncture points of Traditional Chinese Medicine-TCM with the help of histological slides of 12 organs of the main TCM Meridians, using the method first described by Yoshiaki Omura Sc.D.  M.D. To determine the relationship of the Lung Meridian of TCM and the points drawn with a histological human Lung slide by BDORT, it was mapped the upper limb in 41 healthy individuals. There were almost identical matches in all points in 26 subjects (63.4%). In 15 subjects there were no identical matches at any point (36.5%). In all cases of no identical matches of the points, the new Lu1 point is displaced in the direction of midpoint of thorax below the clavicle. On the arm there was a medially deviation in comparison to the line obtained from the TCM points, for example the new Lu9 point was located on the midpoint of the wrist.   

Key Words: Traditional Chinese Medicine; Lung meridian; Acupuncture point; Bi-Digital O-Ring Test; Histologic slide of Human Lung 

 

ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RES., INT. J., Vol. 36, pp. 231-258, 2011Copyright ©2011 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.
0360-1293/95 $60.00 + .00

The Characteristics of Acupuncture-Like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (Acupuncture-like TENS): A Literature Review 

Richard P. Francis Ph.D.
Research Associate, Faculty of Health, Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, United Kingdom; The Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom.

Mark I. Johnson , Ph.D.
Prof. of Pain and Analgesia, Faculty of Health, Leeds Metropolitan University, Leeds, United Kingdom

(Correspondence: Dr Richard P. Francis, Neurosurgical Trials Unit, 3-4 Claremont Terrace, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE2 4AE, United Kingdom. Telephone: (UK) 07534952649. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )

(Received 27 November 2009; Accepted with Revisions 5 October 2011)

ABSTRACT:
Acupuncture-like Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) is used for pain relief. This study aimed to review the descriptions of the characteristics of acupuncture-like TENS reported within the published literature up to June 2011. A total of 88 items of published literature were retrieved.. 35 authors or groups provided 1 publication (Single Contributions - SC) and 10 authors or groups provided more than 1 publication (Multiple Contributions - MC). In order to gain the acupuncture-like effects of TENS, authors often characterised acupuncture-like TENS using: an intensity that caused muscle contractions (6MC, 17SC), or a sensation to tolerance threshold (3MC, 4SC); a 1-4 pulses per second (pps) pulse rate (5MC, 16SC); a 100-200μs pulse duration (2MC, 8SC); stimulation to acupuncture points (5MC, 4SC), or myotomes (3MC, 3SC), or over the painful area (3MC, 1SC). Critically, unlike many authors included in the present review, the International Association for the Study of Pain core curriculum does not mention the triggering of muscle contractions when acupuncture-like TENS is defined. This may be an area that that they should reconsider.

Keywords: Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation (TENS); Analgesia; Acupuncture.

 

ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RES., INT. J., Vol. 36, pp. 259-273, 2011
Copyright ©2011 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.
0360-1293/95 $60.00 + .00

EFFECTS OF ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ON DEPRESSION IN A RAT MODEL

Shifen Xu, Ph.D., CMD
Associate Chief Physician of Acupuncture department, Shanghai Municipal Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine affiliated to Shanghai TCM University, Shanghai 200071, China; Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

Shengtian Li, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Laboratory of Synaptic Signaling and Behavioral Neurosciences, School of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China

Xueyong Shen, CMD
Director and Professor of Acupuncture College of Shanghai Traditional Chinese Medicine University, Shanghai 201203, China

Xianze Meng, CMD
Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai Changzheng Hospital, the Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200001, China

Lixing Lao, Ph.D. L.Ac., CMD
Director and Professor of Traditional Chinese Medicine Program, Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA

(Correspondence: Dr. Lao LX, Center for Integrative Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . Tel:(410) 706-6187, Fax: (410) 706-6210.)

(Received 2 August 2011, Accepted with Revisions 18 October 2011)


ABSTRACT:
Objective. To investigate the antidepressant-like effect of electroacupuncture (EA) in a validated rat model. Methods. Wistar Kyoto rats, a valid animal model of depression, were randomly divided into two groups, EA (n=7) and placebo control (n=6). EA treatment was given once a day, 5 days a week, for 3 weeks. Two acupoints, GV14 (Dazhui) and GV20 (Baihui), respectively on 2 the cervical spine and scalp, were selected. EA frequency was held constant at 2Hz (2 pulses/second), pulse width 0.3-ms, and intensity was adjusted to 3 mA. Forced swim tests (FST), open field tests (OFT; e.g., a. rearing and grooming, b. distance traveled within a central area, c. time spent in central area, and d. total distance traveled), and the Morris Water Maze test (MWM) were conducted 3 weeks after the initial treatment. Results. In the FST, there was significant difference between EA and control (P<0.05) in immobility. In the OFT, there were significant differences between EA and control (P<0.05) in rearing and grooming (P<0.05). In the MWM, there were significant differences between treatment and control in frequency of crossing the platform (P<0.05) and its surrounding area (P<0.05). Conclusion. Our data demonstrate that EA enhances memory and improves depression-related behaviors in a rat model of depression. This suggests that the modality may have therapeutic effects on depression in humans. Electroacupuncture may act on depression by protecting nerve cells in the hippocampus.


KEYWORDS:
Electroacupuncture; Acupuncture Points; Electrical stimulation; Depression; Open Field Test; Forced Swimming; Morris Water Maze; Rats; Animal Model of Depression; Animal ehavioral test; Antidepressant Treatment

  

ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RES., INT. J., Vol. 36, pp. 275-286, 2011
Copyright ©2011 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.
0360-1293/95 $60.00 + .00

Pain Induced by Intensive Light Beam Pulse Stimulation of Acupuncture Point GB34 of Lower Extremities and its Associated Changes in EEGs

Fu-Shin Lee, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Hua Fan University, Taipei, Taiwan

Tai-An Chang, Ph.D. candidate,
Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Hua Fan University, Taipei, Taiwan; President of EDA Medical Devices Co., Ltd., Taichung, Taiwan

Arthur Wu, Ph.D.
CEO of Vitabio, Inc. Foster City, California, USA

Correspondence: Tai-An Chiang, No.269, Sancuo St., Nantun Dist., Taichung 40874, Taiwan. Tel:886-4-22513834, Fax: 886-4-26392998, Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

(Received Sept. 15, 2011; Accepted with revisions Oct. 20, 2011)

ABSTRACT:
Pain perception and its EEG wave have been used to describe the body’s neural systemic response with respect to a given stimulation. Pain artificially induced by non-coherent intensive light (wavelength of 500nm~1200nm) impulse has not been studied yet. In this study this technique was applied to statistically correlate the brain activity under induced pain while particular acupuncture points (yanlingchuan of both feet, GB34) were stimulated by intensive light impulses. The brain electrophysiological signals or electroencephalogram (EEG) at Fp1, Fp2 were recorded. The data of brain waves showed a distinguishable raising slope in this study. Intensive light beam impulse with beam diameter of 10 mm and intensity of 14 joule/cm2 was applied to the acupuncture points. In order to quantify the pain effects, a pain intensity function was defined based on the induced pain activities related to the collected data. The pain intensity function and its equations were used to analyze the changing rate of pain with respect to stimulated intensity and pain momentum transport activity. The results showed that the area of the brain wave evoked by pain could be used as pain perception indicator. The raising slope at one brain side was relatively higher when the acupuncture point GB34 at the contralateral side was stimulated. 

Key Words: Intense pulse light; Acupuncture point; Pain intensity function; Pain; Pain momentum transport

 

ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RES., INT. J., Vol. 36, pp. 287-309, 2011
Copyright ©2011 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.
0360-1293/95 $60.00 + .00

New Clinical Findings on the Longevity Gene in Disease, Health, & Longevity: Sirtuin 1 Often Decreases with Advanced Age & Serious Diseases in Most Parts of the Human Body, While Relatively High & Constant Sirtuin 1 Regardless of Age was First Found in the Hippocampus of Supercentenarians

Yoshiaki Omura M.D., Sc.D., F.A.C.A., F.I.C.A.E., F.R.S.M.
Director of Medical Research, Heart Disease Research Foundation; Adjunct Prof. Dept. of Family & Community Medicine, New York Medical College; President & Prof., International College of Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics; Former Adjunct Prof., Dept. of Pharmacology, Chicago Medical School; Former Visiting Research Prof., Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Manhattan College

Dominic P. Lu, D.D.S., F.I.C.A.E.
Clinical Professor of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; President, American Society for the Advancement of Anesthesia in Dentistry; Visiting Prof. of Holistic Dentistry, International College of Acupuncture & Electro- Therapeutics

Marilyn Jones, M.S., D.D.S., F.I.C.A.E.
Visiting Associate Prof. of Holistic Dentistry, International College of Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics; Director, Holistic Dental Center of Houston; Former Assistant Professor of Chemistry, University of Houston, Texas

Brian O’Young, M.D., F.I.C.A.E.
Clinical Associate Prof., Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, New York University School of Medicine; Visiting Prof., Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China

Harsha Duvvi MD, MPH, F.I.C.A.E.
Clinical Assistant Prof., Dept. of Family & Community Medicine and Neurologist, New York Medical College; Visiting Associate Prof. of Integrative Medicine, International College of Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics

Kamila
Paluch, M.S.
Research Assistant at the Heart Disease Research Foundation; Biomedical Engineering Graduate Student at Columbia University

Yasuhiro Shimotsuura M.D., F.I.C.A.E., Cert. ORT-MD (7 Dan)
Vice-President of Japan Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Association; Visiting Prof. of Integrative Medicine, International College of Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics; Director of Shimotsuura Clinic & ORT Life Science Research Institute, Fukuoka, Japan|

Motomu Ohki, M.Sc, F.I.C.A.E. (Hon.)
ORT Life Science Research Institute, Fukuoka, Japan

(Correspondence: Dr. Omura, 800 Riverside Drive (8-I), New York, N.Y. 10032, Tel: (1)(212) 781-6262; Fax: (1)(212)923-2279, email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )

(Received 20 January, 2011; Accepted with Revisions October 1, 2011)

ABSTRACT
The expression of the longevity gene, Sirtuin 1, was non-invasively measured using Electro-Magnetic Field (EMF) resonance phenomenon between a known amount of polyclonal antibody of the C-terminal of Sirtuin 1 & Sirtuin 1 molecule inside of the body. Our measurement of over 100 human adult males and females, ranging between 20-122 years old, indicated that the majority of subjects had Sirtuin 1 levels of 5-10 pg BDORT units in most parts of the body. When Sirtuin 1 was less than 1 pg, the majority of the people had various degrees of tumors or other serious diseases. When Sirtuin 1 levels were less than 0.25 pg BDORT units, a high incidence of AIDS was also detected. Very few people had Sirtuin 1 levels of over 25 pg BDORT units in most parts of the body. We selected 7 internationally recognized supercentenarians who lived between 110-122 years old. To our surprise, most of their body Sirtuin 1 levels were between 2.5-10 pg BDORT units. However, by evaluating different parts of the brain, we found that both sides of the Hippocampus had a much higher amount of Sirtuin 1, between 25-100 pg BDORT units. With most subjects, Sirtuin 1 was found to be higher in the Hippocampus than in the rest of the body and remains relatively constant regardless of age. We found that Aspartame, plastic eye contact lenses, and asbestos in dental apparatuses, which reduce normal cell telomeres, also significantly reduce Sirtuin 1. In addition, we found that increasing normal celltelomere by electrical or mechanical stimulation of True ST-36 increases the expression of the Sirtuin 1 gene in people in which expression is low. This measurement of Sirtuin 1 in the Hippocampus has become a reliable indicator for detecting potential longevity of an individual.

Keywords: Telomere; Aging; Longevity Gene; Sirtuin 1; Hippocampus; Antiaging; Asbestos; Aspartame; Supercentenarians; Cancer; HIV; AIDS; Electro-Magnetic Field (EMF) Resonance Phenomenon; QiGong; Special Solar Energy Stored Paper