Cell Transplantation 21(S1) Abstracts

Return to Cell Transplantation main page>

Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1, pp. S3–S11, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X633725
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Clinical Achievements, Obstacles, Falsehoods, and Future Directions of Cell-Based Neurorestoratology

Hongyun Huang,*† Lin Chen,*† and Paul R. Sanberg‡

*Center for Neurorestoratology, Beijing Rehabilitation Center, Beijing, P.R. China
†Neuroscience Institute of Taishan Medical University, Beijing, P.R. China
‡Department of Neurosurgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA

Neurorestoratology is a newborn and emerging distinct discipline in the neuroscience family. Its establishment will definitely speed up the advance of this promising frontier realm. A worldwide association for Neurorestoratology and several official journals covering this discipline have recently been set up. Clinical practice has demonstrated that the sequelae of damages and diseases of the CNS can be functionally restored to some degree. Obstacles that hinder the promising methods of Neurorestoratology to be translated from the bench to the bedside include political, governmental, religious, ethical, economic, and scientific factors or in most instances they work in combination. Falsehoods against the recognition of neurorestoratology include: 1) no therapeutic method is currently available that suggests that it is possible to repair, even partially, neurological functions; 2) according to the media, a cure will be very soon found for patients with severe spinal cord injury, brain trauma, and progressively deteriorated CNS degenerative diseases; 3) randomizing double blind control designed studies are the only gold standard for clinical study; self-comparison designed studies should be ignored and neglected. Future directions for neurorestoratology include the comparison and integration of current and upcoming available neurorestoration methods to look for the optimization regimes, and edit and publish clinical neurorestoratology treatment guidelines.

Key words: Cell-based neurorestoratology; Clinical achievements; Obstacles; Future directions

Address correspondence to Hongyun Huang, M.D., Ph.D., Center for Neurorestoratology, Beijing Rehabilitation Center, Beijing, 100144, P.R. China. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1, pp. S13–S21, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X612512
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Intra-Arterial Infusion of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells in Patients With Moderate to Severe Middle Cerebral Artery Acute Ischemic Stroke

Maurício A. G. Friedrich,*† Maurer P. Martins,*† Mariana D. Araújo,* Charles Klamt,*† Leonardo Vedolin,* Bernardo Garicochea,* Eduardo F. Raupp,* Jeber Sartori El Ammar,* Denise Cantarelli Machado,* Jaderson C. da Costa,* Raul G. Nogueira,‡ Paulo Henrique Rosado-de-Castro,§ Rosalia Mendez-Otero,¶ and Gabriel R. de Freitas¶

*Hospital São Lucas, Porto Alegre, Brazil
†Hospital Mãe de Deus, Porto Alegre, Brazil
‡Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
§Department of Radiology, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
¶Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) has been proven safe in animal and human studies. However, there are very few studies in stroke patients. In this study, intra-arterial autologous BMMCs were infused in patients with moderate to severe acute middle cerebral artery infarcts. The subjects of this study included 20 patients with early or late spontaneous recanalization but with persistent deficits, in whom treatment could be initiated between 3 and 7 days after stroke onset. Mononuclear cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirates and infused at the proximal middle cerebral artery of the affected hemisphere. Safety analysis (primary endpoint) during the 6-month follow-up assessed death, any serious clinical events, neurological worsening with ≥4-point increase in National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, seizures, epileptogenic activity on electroencephalogram, and neuroimaging complications including new ischemic, hemorrhagic, or neoplastic lesions. Satisfactory clinical improvement (secondary endpoint) at 90 days was defined according to the pretreatment NIHSS scores as follows: modified Rankin Scale score of 0 in patients with NIHSS <8, modified Rankin Scale scores of 0–1 in patients with NIHSS 8–14, or modified Rankin Scale scores 0–2 in patients with NIHSS >14. Good clinical outcome was defined as mRS ≤2 at 90 days. Serial clinical, laboratory, electroencephalogram, and imaging evaluations showed no procedure-related adverse events. Satisfactory clinical improvement occurred in 6/20 (30%) patients at 90 days. Eight patients (40%) showed a good clinical outcome. Infusion of intra-arterial autologous BMMCs appears to be safe in patients with moderate to severe acute middle cerebral artery strokes. No cases of intrahospital mortality were seen in this pilot trial. Larger prospective randomized trials are warranted to assess the efficacy of this treatment approach.

Key words: Stroke; Middle cerebral artery; Bone marrow cell; Cell therapy; Autologous transplantation

Address correspondence to Rosalia Mendez-Otero, M.D., Ph.D., Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Av. Carlos Chagas Filho, 373, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 21941-902, Brazil. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or Maurício A. G. Friedrich, M.D., Ph.D., Serviço de Neurologia, Instituto de Medicina Vascular, Centro de Pesquisa Clínica, Hospital Mãe de Deus, Rua Costa 30 Sala 1606, 90110-270, Porto Alegre, Brazil. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1, pp. S23–S31, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X633734
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Long-Term Outcome of Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Therapy for Patients With Complete Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

Hongyun Huang,*†‡ Haitao Xi,† Lin Chen,*† Feng Zhang,*† and Yancheng Liu*†

*Center for Neurorestoratology, Beijing Rehabilitation Center, Beijing, P.R. China
†Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, Beijing, P.R. China
‡Division of Neurorestoratology, Yuquan Hospital, Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R. China

The neurorestorative effect of the parenchymal transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) for cord trauma remains clinically controversial. The aim of this article is to study the long-term result of OECs for patients with complete chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). One hundred and eight patients suffered from complete chronic SCI were followed up successfully within the period of 3.47 ± 1.12 years after OEC therapy. They were divided into two groups based on the quality and quantity of their rehabilitative training: group A (n = 79) in sufficient rehabilitation (or active movement-target enhancement-neurorehabilitation therapy, AMTENT) and group B (n = 29) in insufficient rehabilitation. All patients were assessed by using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) standard and the International Association of Neurorestoratology Spinal Cord Injury Functional Rating Scale (IANR-SCIFRS). Thirty-one patients were evaluated by the tests of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electromyography (EMG), and paravertebral sensory evoked potential (PVSEP). We found the following. 1) According to ASIA and IANR-SCIFRS assessment for all 108 patients, averaged motor scores increased from 37.79 ± 18.45 to 41.25 ± 18.18 (p < 0.01), light touch scores from 50.32 ± 24.71 to 55.90 ± 24.46 (p < 0.01), pin prick scores from 50.53 ± 24.92 to 54.53 ± 24.62 (p < 0.01); IANR-SCIFRS scores increased from 19.32 ± 9.98 to 23.12 ± 10.30 (p < 0.01). 2) The score changes in terms of motor, light touch, pin prick, and IANR-SCIFRS in group A were remarkably different (all p < 0.01). The score changes in group B were remarkably different in terms of motor (p < 0.05) and IANR-SCIFRS (p < 0.01), but not light touch or pin prick (p > 0.05). 3) Comparing group A with group B, the increased scores in terms of motor, light touch, and pin prick were remarkably different (all p < 0.01), but not IANR-SCIFRS (p > 0.05). 4) Fourteen of 108 patients (12.96%) became ASIA B from ASIA A; 18 of 108 (16.67%) became ASIA C from ASIA A. Nine of them (8.33%) improved their walk ability or made them rewalk by using a walker with or without assistance; 12 of 84 men (14.29%) improved their sex function. 5) MRI examinations were taken for 31 patients; there were no neoplasm, bleeding, swelling, cysts, neural tissue destruction or infection (abscess) or any other pathological changes in or around OEC transplant sites. 6) EMG examinations were done on 31 patients; 29 showed improvement and the remaining 2 had no change. PVSEP tests were performed in 31 patients; 28 showed improvements and the remaining 3 had no change. 7) No deterioration or complications were observed in our patients within the follow-up period. Our data suggest OEC therapy is safe and can improve neurological functions for patients with complete chronic SCI and ameliorate their quality of life; the AMTENT most likely plays a critical role in enhancing functional recovery after cell-based neurorestorotherapy.

Key words: Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs); Neurorestorotherapy; Complete chronic spinal cord injury; Long-term follow-up; Active-movement target-enhancement neurorehabilitation

Address correspondence to Hongyun Huang, M.D., Ph.D., Center for Neurorestoratology, Beijing Rehabilitation Center, Beijing, 100144,

P.R. China. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1, pp. S33–S37, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X633743
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Clinical Observation of Fetal Olfactory Ensheathing Glia Transplantation (OEGT) in Patients With Complete Chronic Spinal Cord Injury

Jun Wu, Tiansheng Sun, Chaoqun Ye, Jianhua Yao, Bing Zhu, and Hongying He

Department of Orthopedics, The Beijing Army General Hospital, Beijing, P.R. China

This study was designed to observe the functional changes after fetal olfactory ensheathing glia transplantation (OEGT) into the spinal cord of patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). Patients whose recovery had plateaued for longer than 6 months were enrolled. Six thoracic patients were tested for safety and five cervical patients for efficacy. OEGT was performed according to the method developed by Huang. Average follow-up was 14 months (range 1.0–1.5 years). Sensation improved moderately (light touch 14.2, pin prick 13.6); as did spasticity (1–2 modified Ashworth scale down). Locomotion recovery was minimal (1.6). Useful reticular formation functions were observed, but due to a lack of appropriate outcome measure, they were not recorded and reported.

Key words: Spinal cord injury (SCI); Olfactory ensheathing cells; Cell transplantation; Clinical observation

Address correspondence to Tiansheng Sun, The Department of Orthopedics, The Beijing Army General Hospital, 5 Nanmengcang Lane, Beijing 100700, P.R. China. Tel: 86-10-66721207; Fax: 86-10-84042490; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1 pp. S39–S47, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X633752
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Transplantation of Autologous Activated Schwann Cells in the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury: Six Cases, More Than Five Years of Follow-up

Xian-Hu Zhou,*1 Guang-Zhi Ning,*1 Shi-Qing Feng,* Xiao-Hong Kong,† Jia-Tong Chen,† Yong-Fa Zheng,* De-Xiang Ban,* Tao Liu,* Hui Li,* and Pei Wang*

*Department of Orthopaedics, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, P.R. China
†Medicine College, NanKai University, Tianjin, P.R. China

Schwann cells (SCs) are the main glial cells of the peripheral nervous system, which can promote neural regeneration. Grafting of autologous SCs is one of the well-established and commonly performed procedures for peripheral nerve repair. With the aim to improve the clinical condition of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), a program of grafting autologous activated Schwann cells (AASCs), as well as a series of appropriate neurorehabilitation programs, was employed to achieve the best therapeutic effects. We selected six patients who had a history of SCI before transplantation. At first, AASCs were obtained by prior ligation of sural nerve and subsequently isolated, cultured, and purified in vitro. Then the patients accepted an operation of laminectomy and cell transplantation, and no severe adverse event was observed in any of these patients. Motor and sensitive improvements were evaluated by means of American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grading and Functional Independence Measure (FIM); bladder and urethral function were determined by clinical and urodynamic examination; somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) were used to further confirm the functional recovery following transplantation. The patients were followed up for more than 5 years. All of the patients showed some signs of improvement in autonomic, motor, and sensory function. So we concluded that AASC transplantation might be feasible, safe, and effective to promote neurorestoration of SCI patients.

Key words: Spinal cord injury (SCI); Autologous activated Schwann cells (AASCs); Humans; Cell transplantation

1These authors provided equal contribution to this work and should be considered co-first authors.
Address correspondence to Shi-Qing Feng, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, 300052, P.R. China. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1, pp. S49–S56, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X633761
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Effects of Hematopoietic Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation to the Chronically Injured Human Spinal Cord Evaluated by Motor and Somatosensory Evoked Potentials Methods

A. A. Frolov and A. S. Bryukhovetskiy

NeuroVita Clinic of Interventional and Restorative Neurology and Therapy, Moscow, Russia

International standards for stem cell treatment of neurological disorders have not yet been established. In particular, specific quantitative methods have not yet been adopted to assess the effectiveness of stem cell treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the functional changes detectable by conventional neurophysiologic methods in an injured spinal cord during stem cell therapy. Twenty adult patients with chronic spinal cord injury at C4–C8 level were examined by somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) methods, the first time prior to the treatment and then regularly during its course (1–4 years). The treatment consisted of repeated intrathecal transplantations of autologous hematopoietic stem cells. After at least 1 year of treatment, four effects were detected: 1) restoration of the initially absent short-latency SEP (three patients); 2. N20P23 interpeak amplitude increase in SEP elicited by median nerve stimulation (four patients); 3) P38 latency reduction in SEP elicited by tibial nerve stimulation (two patients); 4) appearance of MEP (three patients). The nonidentical effects of stem cell transplantation in different patients presumably reflect the variety of the regeneration processes in different pathways of the spinal cord, depending on the extent and nature of lesion of the spinal cord pathways in different patients. The local effects of stem cell treatment at the cervical level were evaluated by median SEP and wrist muscle MEP demonstrate the ability of stem cells to spread within the spinal cord at least from lumbar to the cervical level, home there, and participate in the neurorestoration processes.

Key words: Spinal cord injury (SCI); Hematopoietic stem cell; Somatosensory evoked potential (SEP); Motor evoked potential (MEP); Neurorestoration

Address correspondence to A. S. Bryukhovetskiy, NeuroVita Clinic of Interventional and Restorative Neurology and Therapy, 23 Kashirskoye shosse, Moscow, Russia. Tel: +7 495 3249339; Fax: +7 495 9801373; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1, pp. S57–S63, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X633770
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Feasibility, Safety, and Preliminary Proof of Principles of Autologous Neural Stem Cell Treatment Combined With T-Cell Vaccination for ALS Patients

G. A. Moviglia, M. T. Moviglia-Brandolino, G. S. Varela, G. Albanese, S. Piccone, G. Echegaray, G. Martinez, N. Blasseti, J. Farias, P. Farina, A. Perusso, and C. A. Gaeta

CIITT, Maimonides University, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Uncontrolled activation of the innate immune system promotes the deterioration of neurons in different neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). T-cell vaccination (TCV) was developed by Irun Cohen and coworkers at the Weizmann Institute of Science (Israel) during the late 1970s and has been demonstrated to be an effective treatment for human autoimmune diseases and a regulator of macrophage activation in animal models. We treated seven ALS patients with this cell therapy and were able to slow or stop disease progression in the affected individuals. The median survival, which is 3.5 years, was extended to 6 years. They were also treated with autologous adult neural stem cells associated with effector T cells. The observed neurologic improvements after treatment lasted for at least 1 year. Clinical recovery in the treated ALS patients was confirmed by an independent, skilled neurologist using the ALS Functional Rating Scale-Revised (ALSFRS-R). TCV in conjunction with an autologous neural stem cell treatment might be a feasible, minimally invasive, safe, and effective approach to obtain enduring therapeutic effects in ALS patients.

Key words: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); T-cell vaccination (TCV); Neural stem cells

Address correspondence to Gustavo A Moviglia, CIITT, Maimonides University, Buenos Aires, Argentina. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1, pp. S65–S77, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X633789
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Neurorestorotherapy for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients: Benefits From Multiple Transplantations

Lin Chen,*†1 Di Chen,†1 Haitao Xi,*† Qingmiao Wang,† Yancheng Liu,*† Feng Zhang,*† Hongmei Wang,*† Yushui Ren,† Juan Xiao,† Yuanchao Wang,† and Hongyun Huang*†‡

*Center for Neurorestoratology, Beijing Rehabilitation Center, Beijing, P.R. China
†Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, Beijing, P.R. China
‡Division of Neurorestoratology, Yuquan Hospital, Tsinghua University, Beijing, P.R. China

Our previous series of studies have proven that olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation appears to be able to slow the rate of clinical progression after OEC transplantation in the first 4 months and cell intracranial (key points for neural network restoration, KPNNR) and/or intraspinal (impaired segments) implants provide benefit for patients (including both the bulbar onset and limb onset subtypes) with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here we report the results of cell therapy in patients with ALS on the basis of long-term observation following multiple transplants. From March of 2003 to January of 2010, 507 ALS patients received our cellular treatment. Among them, 42 patients underwent further OEC therapy by the route of KPNNR for two or more times (two times in 35 patients, three times in 5 patients, four times in 1 patient, and five times in 1 patient). The time intervals are 13.1 (6–60) months between the first therapy and the second one, 15.2 (8–24) months between the second therapy and the third one, 16 (6–26) months between the third therapy and the fourth one, and 9 months between the fourth therapy and the fifth time. All of the patients exhibited partial neurological functional recovery after each cell-based administration. Firstly, the scores of the ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALS-FRS) and ALS Norris Scale increased by 2.6 + 2.4 (0–8) and 4.9 + 5.2 (0–20) after the first treatment, 1.1 + 1.3 (0–5) and 2.3 + 2.9 (0–13) after the second treatment, 1.1 + 1.5 (0–4), and 3.4 + 6.9 (0–19) after the third treatment, 0.0 + 0.0 (0–0), and 2.5 + 3.5 (0–5) after the fourth treatment, and 1 point after the fifth cellular therapy, which were evaluated by independent neurologists. Secondly, the majority of patients have achieved improvement in electromyogram (EMG) assessments after the first, second, third, and fourth cell transplantation. After the first treatment, among the 42 patients, 36 (85.7%) patients’ EMG test results improved, the remaining 6 (14.3%) patients’ EMG results showed no remarkable change. After the second treatment, of the 42 patients, 30 (71.4%) patients’ EMG results improved, 11 (26.2%) patients showed no remarkable change, and 1 (2.4%) patient became worse. After the third treatment, out of the 7 patients, 4 (57.1%) patients improved, while the remaining 3 (42.9%) patients showed no change. Thirdly, the patients have partially recovered their breathing ability as demonstrated by pulmonary functional tests. After the first treatment, 20 (47.6%) patients’ pulmonary function ameliorated. After the second treatment, 18 (42.9%) patients’ pulmonary function improved. After the third treatment, 2 (28.6%) patients recovered some pulmonary function. After the fourth and fifth treatment, patients’ pulmonary function did not reveal significant change. The results show that multiple doses of cellular therapy definitely serve as a positive role in the treatment of ALS. This repeated and periodic cell-based therapy is strongly recommended for the patients, for better controlling this progressive deterioration disorder.

Key words: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs); Multiple transplantation; Clinical study; Neurorestorotherapy

1Coauthors.
Address correspondence to Hongyun Huang, M.D., Ph.D., Center for Neurorestoratology, Beijing Rehabilitation Center, Beijing, 100144, P.R. China. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1, pp. S79–S90, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X633798
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Administration of Autologous Bone Marrow-Derived Mononuclear Cells in Children With Incurable Neurological Disorders and Injury Is Safe and Improves Their Quality of Life

Alok Sharma,* Nandini Gokulchandran,* Guneet Chopra,* Pooja Kulkarni,† Mamta Lohia,‡ Prerna Badhe,† and V. C. Jacob‡

*Department of Medical Services and Clinical Research, NeuroGen Brain and Spine Institute, Surana Sethia Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai, India
†Department of Research & Development, NeuroGen Brain and Spine Institute, Surana Sethia Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai, India
‡Department of NeuroRehablitaion, NeuroGen Brain and Spine Institute, Surana Sethia Hospital and Research Centre, Mumbai, India

Neurological disorders such as muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, and injury to the brain and spine currently have no known definitive treatments or cures. A study was carried out on 71 children suffering from such incurable neurological disorders and injury. They were intrathecally and intramuscularly administered autologous bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells. Assessment after transplantation showed neurological improvements in muscle power and a shift on assessment scales such as FIM and Brooke and Vignos scale. Further, imaging and electrophysiological studies also showed significant changes in selective cases. On an average follow-up of 15 ± 1 months, overall 97% muscular dystrophy cases showed subjective and functional improvement, with 2 of them also showing changes on MRI and 3 on EMG. One hundred percent of the spinal cord injury cases showed improvement with respect to muscle strength, urine control, spasticity, etc. Eighty-five percent of cases of cerebral palsy cases showed improvements, out of which 75% reported improvement in muscle tone and 50% in speech among other symptoms. Eighty-eight percent of cases of other incurable neurological disorders such as autism, Retts Syndrome, giant axonal neuropathy, etc., also showed improvement. No significant adverse events were noted. The results show that this treatment is safe, efficacious, and also improves the quality of life of children with incurable neurological disorders and injury.

Key words: Autologous; Bone marrow; Adult stem cells; Mononuclear cells; Spinal cord injury; Muscular dystrophy; Cerebral palsy

Address correspondence to Dr. Alok Sharma, M.S., M.Ch., Consultant NeuroSurgeon, NeuroGen Brain and Spine Institute, Surana Sethia Hospital and Research Centre, Suman Nagar, Sion-Trombay Road, Chembur, Mumbai-400071, India. Tel: 91-022-25283706/91-022-65220066; Fax: 91-022-25292250; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Cell Transplantation, Vol. 21, Supplement 1, pp. S91–S98, 2012
0963-6897/12 $90.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/096368912X633806
E-ISSN 1555-3892
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved

Effects of Neural Progenitor Cell Transplantation in Children With Severe Cerebral Palsy

Zuo Luan,*1 Weipeng Liu,*1 Suqing Qu,* Kan Du,* Sheng He,† Zhaoyan Wang,* Yinxiang Yang,* Caiying Wang,* and Xiaojun Gong*

*Department of Pediatrics, Navy General Hospital, Beijing, P.R. China
†Department of Ultrasound Diagnosis, Navy General Hospital, Beijing, P.R. China

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a chronic nervous system disease that severely damages the physical and developmental health of children. Traditional treatment brings about only improvement of mild to moderate CP, but severe CP still lacks effective interventions. To explore safety and efficacy of using neural progenitor cells (NPCs) to treat CP in children, we performed NPC transplantation in 45 patients with severe CP by injecting NPCs derived from aborted fetal tissue into the lateral ventricle. Gross motor function measures (GMFM), the Peabody Developmental Motor Scale-Fine Motor (PDMS-FM) test, and a unified survey questionnaire designed specifically for children with CP were used to evaluate neurological function of the patients. Motor development was significantly accelerated within the first month after cell transplantation, but the rate of improvement gradually slowed to preoperative levels. However, after 1 year, the developmental level in each functional sphere (gross motor, fine motor, and cognition) of the treatment group was significantly higher compared to the control group. No delayed complications of this therapy were noted. These results suggest that NPC transplantation is a safe and effective therapeutic method for treating children with severe CP.

Key words: Neural progenitor cells (NPCs); Transplantation; Cerebral palsy (CP)

1These authors provided equal contribution to this work.
Address correspondence to Zuo Luan, Department of Pediatrics, Navy General Hospital, No 6, Fucheng Road, Post Code 100048, Beijing, P.R. China. Tel: 86 10 66958303; Fax: 86 10 66958303; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it