Tourism Culture & Communication 11(3) Abstracts

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Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 11, pp. 137–147
1098-304X/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830412X13346876802112
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Built Heritage Conservation, Urban Development, and Tourism: Singapore in the 21st Century

Joan C. Henderson

Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

The article discusses the dynamics of the relationship between heritage conservation and urban development and consequences for tourism with particular reference to the city-state of Singapore. Government policies are examined and reveal that heritage is seen by officials to serve multiple purposes, not least as a tourist resource. Its economic role is appreciated, but awareness of sociocultural and political value is also apparent. Conflicts arise, however, between the demands of urban development in pursuit of economic growth and heritage conservation. The former tend to have priority in decision making, which can lead to negative outcomes. Specific examples of historic waterfront properties and their transformation into tourism and leisure spaces are employed as illustrations which also suggest the dilemmas inherent in the adaptive reuse of old buildings. While Singapore is a distinctive case, its study affords insights into general challenges of conserving built heritage in rapidly developing cities with a global orientation that are also international tourist destinations.

Key words: Built heritage; Conservation; Singapore; Tourism; Urban development

Address correspondence to Joan C. Henderson, Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, 639798, Tel: 65 6790 6116; Fax: 65 6794 9796; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 11, pp. 149–164
1098-304X/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830412X13346876802158
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Moving From Pilgrimage to “Dark” Tourism: Leveraging Tourism in Palestine

Rami K. Isaac* and Gregory J. Ashworth†

*Center for Cross-cultural Understanding, NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands
†Heritage Management and Urban Tourism, Faculty of Spatial Sciences, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

Traveling to places associated with death is not a new phenomenon. People have long been drawn, purposefully or otherwise, towards sites, attractions, and events linked in one way or another with death, suffering, violence, or disaster. War-related attractions, though diverse, are a subset of the totality of tourist sites associated with death and suffering. This article aims to assess how “dark” tourism may play a role in leveraging tourism in Palestine, which has largely relied on pilgrimage tourism in the past. This article investigates the potential for developing this form of tourism, since Palestine has been undergoing death, suffering, violence, or disaster through political tension and instability since 1948 and arguably for a generation earlier, but has not yet developed a strategy for tourism development that considers this type of tourism.

Key words: Palestine; Suffering; Wall; Dark tourism; Pilgrimage

Address correspondence to Rami K. Isaac, Senior Tourism Lecturer, Center for Cross-cultural Understanding, NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences, The Netherlands, Mgr. Hopmansstraat 1, 4817 JT Breda, The Netherlands, Tel: + 31 76 530 2203; Fax: + 31 530 2295; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 11, pp. 165–182
1098-304X/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830412X13346876802194
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Semiotic Construction of a Holiday Country: The Case of Croatia

Mislava Bertoša, Vesna Muhvić-Dimanovski, and Anita Skelin Horvat

Institute of Linguistics, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia

Using Croatia as an example, this article analyses modes of constructing a country as a tourist destination, from a semiotic perspective. From this perspective, tourism may be viewed as a practice that contrasts with everyday life. It encompasses dimensions including the following aspects of the journey: travel, absence of obligation, entertainment, and relaxation. To be a tourist and to practice tourism involves dislocation and transferring from one’s place of residence to another place. This “other place” is constructed and represented to potential tourists as a “tourist destination.” The article focuses on the contents and targets of the tourist’s travel, or, semiotically speaking, their valorizations. The principal starting point is the typology of valorizations elaborated by Floch. A place becomes a tourist destination when it has been semiotically valorized (i.e., when it is ascribed a certain value). This value may be represented to potential travelers/tourists via different modes of expression including catalogues, brochures, websites, and advertisements. The analysis has been thematically narrowed to the field of Croatian cultural heritage, with particular reference to history, art, architecture, monuments, and festivals. The subject of the analysis is a brochure published by the Croatian National Tourist Board in 2009. The authors examine semiotic strategies and modes of ascribing values and meanings to places that are presented as historical and cultural destinations. They take into consideration both verbal and visual modes, and identify the types of semiotic valorizations that have been used in the construction of a place as a tourist target.

Key words: Semiotics of marketing; Semiotic valorization; Tourism marketing; Tourism (semiotic perspective)

Address correspondence to Mislava Bertoša, Department of Linguistics, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Zagreb, Ivana Lučića 3, 10 000 Zagreb, Croatia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 11, pp. 183–199
1098-304X/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830412X13346876802239
Copyright © 2010 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Cross-Cultural Comparison of International Tourist Destination Images

Hsuan-Hsuan Chang

Tourism School, Ming Chuan University, Taoyuan, Taiwan

The researchers undertook an empirical examination of the tourist images of Taiwan prior to and after visiting a Taiwanese tourist night market. A survey was distributed at Shilin Night Market and generated 230 responses from Japanese, 171 from US/Canadian, and 95 from Mandarin-speaking Chinese tourists. The data analysis indicated significant differences between the trip characteristics of respondents from the three groups. The images held by visitors from Japan and Hong Kong/Macau/China were found to be more positive after than before they visited the night market. However, the tourism images held by visitors from the US and Canada were the same after as before visiting. The results indicated that the changes between induced (before the trip) and complex tourism images (after the trip) varied on the basis of nationality, age, occupation, education, and income. The researchers suggest that the Taiwan Tourism Bureau and organizations associated with the tourist night market should implement marketing strategies targeted at international tourists, including promotion and product development, on the basis of their nationality and/or cultural background.

Key words: Tourism image; Destination image; Cross-cultural study; Tourist night market

Address correspondence to Dr. Hsuan-Hsuan Chang, Assistant Professor, Tourism School, Ming Chuan University, 5F, 57, Rd. NanChang, LuZhu Township, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Tel: 886-966056149; Fax: 886-3-3593871; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it