Event Management 16(3) Abstracts

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Event Management, Vol. 16, pp. 189–201
1525-9951/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599512X13459279626683
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Risk Management in Major Sporting Events: A Participating National Olympic Team’s Perspective

Dag Vidar Hanstad

Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway

This article explores the process of risk management in a major sporting event from the perspective of a participating team. More specifically, the article examines how Norway’s national team before and during the 2010 Olympic Winter Games (OWG) in Vancouver (i) identified the risk management issues, and (ii) handled risk strategies. The qualitative case study reported here draws upon documents and interviews with key actors in the Norwegian Top Sports Program (Olympiatoppen) and other important stakeholders for the preparation and implementation of the Vancouver project based on the experiences from 2006 OWG in Turin, Italy. The article utilizes previous research on risk management and strategic management in order to analyze a participating team’s preparation and implementation. A framework for dealing with risk management issues experienced by participating teams at sporting events is provided.

Key words: Risk management; Risk issues; Risk strategy; Sporting event; Olympic Games

Address correspondence to Dag Vidar Hanstad, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, PO Box 4014 Ullevaal Stadion, 0806 Oslo, Norway. Tel: +47 23 26 23 62; Fax: +47 23 26 24 14; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 16, pp. 203–221
1525-9951/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599512X13459279626728
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Use of Events in the Development of the Tourism Industry: The Case of Cyprus

Kakia Avgousti

Hospitality and Catering Department, American College, Nicosia, Cyprus

Event tourism is a subject that has not passed through any intensive research in the case of Cyprus. The current research attempted to investigate the extent to which events contribute to the development of tourism in Cyprus. In more depth, the research study compared both primary and secondary research on the subject of events, their importance, and their contribution to the development of tourism in Cyprus. In conclusion it highlighted the minimum contribution of events in the development of tourism in Cyprus as events are being used as supplements in the case of Cyprus, and as a tool that will assist to the strengthening and enrichment of the existing tourism product. However, potentials and opportunities exist for further developments regarding this sector. In response to these, tourism organizations, authorities, and tourism bearers should become active players and create such strategic plans, to develop events in means that will be fitted to the existing image of the island and thus improving, not changing, its tourism product.

Key words: Events; Tourism development; Cyprus

Address correspondence to Kakia Avgousti, Lecturer, Hospitality and Catering Department, Americanos College, 2 & 3 Omirou Avenue, P.O. Box 22425, 1521 Nicosia, Cyprus. Tel: +357-22661122; Fax: +357-22665458; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 16, pp. 223–244
1525-9951/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599512X13459279626809
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Strong Ties Within Cultural Organization Event Networks and Local Development in a Tale of Three Festivals

Francesco Izzo, Enrico Bonetti, and Barbara Masiello

Department of Management and Accounting, University of Naples II, Capua, Italy

The purpose of this article is to provide a deeper understanding of successful event networks and offer a conceptual framework which can be used to analyze their impact on local development. In particular, this study addresses two research questions. First, how does network structure affect the success of the event and its outcomes on local development, other than in economic terms? Second, which main capabilities does the “network orchestrator” need to promote the effectiveness of the event network? By analyzing three different Italian cultural festivals—“Festivaletteratura” (“Festival of Literature”—Mantua), “Festival della Scienza” (“Festival of Science”—Genoa), and “Festivalfilosofia” (“Festival of Philosophy”—Modena, Carpi, Sassuolo)—this article sheds light on: (a) the features of successful event networks, (b) the dynamics linking network structure and the social outcomes generated, and (c) the typical bundle of relational capabilities that network orchestrators need. Then we draw some implications for management and offer some remarks to stimulate further research in the field of special events.

Key words: Festival and special events; Event management; Local development; Network theory

Address correspondence to Barbara Masiello, Assistant Professor of Management, Department of Management and Accounting, University of Naples II, Corso Gran Priorato di Malta, 1, Capua, 81043 (CE), Italy. Tel: (+39) 0823 27 4030; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 16, pp. 245–258
1525-9951/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599512X13459279626845
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Attributes Influencing Wedding Reception Venue Selection

Margaret J. Daniels, Seungwon Lee, and Tessa Cohen

Tourism and Events Management, School of Recreation, Health and Tourism, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA

While wedding expenditure patterns and averages are well documented, there is a shortage of knowledge regarding wedding spending determinants. The current study focuses on the largest expenditure category, comprised of the reception and associated rentals, to shed light on the variables that influence the decision-making process when couples select a venue. Newlyweds living in the Washington, DC metropolitan area completed an online questionnaire where they provided details regarding wedding specifics and rated the importance of 40 selection attributes associated with their chosen reception venues. Principal components extraction revealed five meaningful factors: communication, food/beverage, aesthetics, pricing, and access. Implications focus on communication immediacy, staff training, aesthetic flexibility, pricing transparency, and spatial dynamics.

Key words: Weddings; Venue selection; Consumer behavior

Address correspondence to Margaret J. Daniels, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Tourism and Events Management, School of Recreation, Health and Tourism, George Mason University, 10900 University Blvd., MS 4E5, Manassas, VA 20110-2203, USA. Tel: 703-993-4279; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 16, pp. 259–265
1525-9951/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599512X13461660017475
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Disability, Access, and Inclusion in the Event Industry: A Call for Inclusive Event Research

Simon Darcy

UTS Business School—Management, University Technology, Sydney, Lindfield, NSW, Australia

The article sets a context of the United Nations’ (2006) Convention for the Rights of Persons with Disabilities as an international agreement that in principle guarantees people with disability an equality of experience in all areas of citizenship including the event industry. The remainder of the article provides an understanding of the demographics of the group, the research literature in event specific journals, market arguments examples, and an overview of disability-specific events that the industry may not have previously considered. The article concludes with a call for the events industry to develop a culture of inclusive practice and for academic event researchers to place disability, access, and inclusion on the research agenda.

Key words: Disability; Discrimination; Inclusive practice; United Nations’ Convention; Citizenship

Address correspondence to Simon Darcy, UTS Business School—Management, University Technology, Sydney, PO Box 222, Lindfield NSW 2070, Australia. Tel: 61 2 9514-5100; Fax: 61 2 9514-5195; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it