Tourism Review International 16(2) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 16, pp. 89–100
1544-2721/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427212X13485031583812
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Advancing Social Sustainability in Film Tourism

Anne Buchmann

Newcastle Business School, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, Australia

Film tourism research has produced numerous case studies but little theoretical development. As an example, many film tourism studies report social impacts and further sustainability issues in a trend mirroring the wider tourism literature. This article presents a theoretical approach analyzing the potential and realization of sustainable film tourism. It introduces the notions of social sustainability and discusses its adaptation, concentrating on the case studies of Whale Rider and Lord of the Rings tourism. For this, the study also refers to literature and previous case studies into organizations demonstrating sustainable vision and/or behavior in the contemporary New Zealand film tourism industry. The article argues the need to adapt currently existing frameworks to film tourism theory and practice.

Key words: Social sustainability; Framework; Film tourism

Address correspondence to Dr. Anne Buchmann, Lecturer in Tourism Management, Newcastle Business School, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia. Tel: +61 2 4921 7234; Fax: +61 2 4921 7402; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 16, pp. 101–112
1544-2721/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427212X13485031583867
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Films and Audiovisual Potentiality in Tourism Destination Promotion: A European Perspective

Francesco Di Cesare,*† Anthony A. La Salandra,*† and Elena Craparotta*

*Università Ca’Foscari, Venezia, Italia
†Risposte Turismo s.r.l., Venezia, Italia

The audiovisual medium represents a tool that is able to influence the perception and the decision-making process of a large potential tourist demand. This can be commonly observed but is also confirmed, year by year, by a wide variety of empirical research studies worldwide. In some of them it emerged that the mere portrayal of a destination in an audiovisual production is not enough to reap the benefits of film-induced tourism. Tourism destinations need to work proactively to orient this phenomenon and to promote their territory and resources, among a whole and articulated destination strategy. In recent years, several tourism organizations worldwide recognized the opportunities associated with film tourism, but the lack of a clear strategy allowing the destination to benefit from such opportunities has often resulted in missing good chances. It is still unclear how much tourism development managers believe in the potential of audiovisual productions as a tool to be included in their destination management and marketing strategy. Furthermore, it is not clear whether such destination managers consider audiovisual and film productions among their tourism promotion tools at all. This article’s aim is to shed light on this situation. In order to understand what is, or is not, happening, a significant and heterogeneous panel of 30 European tourism destinations has been surveyed with a quantitative research approach through a questionnaire-based web survey. It emerged that, as indicated by 100% of the respondents, European destination managers are aware of the relationship between film and tourism and mostly keen to work on it. But it is also possible to notice—among the results—that it seems movie-induced tourism is used just through sporadic attempts and therefore not approached in a strategic way. The survey explores both existing attitudes towards the phenomenon, and the commitment to develop it, using film in tourism communication strategies. The results of this article provide a new foundation for further research, as well as operative suggestions for worldwide tourism professionals committed to tourism development.

Key words: Film tourism; Destination management organizations (DMOs); Destination management; Movie-induced tourism

Address correspondence to Francesco di Cesare, President of Risposte Turismo s.r.l. Fond.ta S. Giacomo 212, 30133 Venezia, Italia. Tel: +390412446990; Fax: +390412446985; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 16, pp. 113–124
1544-2721/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427212X13485031583894
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Michael Palin’s Himalaya: Potential Impact of Television Travel Diaries on Destination Image

Petra Glover

Royal Docks Business School, University of East London, London, UK

A strong academic interest in media-induced tourism has emerged in recent years with a focus on fictional movies and television programs. In contrast, few studies have evaluated audiovisual formats of factual or documentary nature, despite the increasing popularity of such television programs with a specific travel theme. In the UK, programs resembling video diaries in which the presenter, generally a celebrity, is accompanied on an extended journey by a television crew are firmly established in the television schedule. This article examines the potential impacts of the television travel series Himalaya presented by Michael Palin on destination image by analyzing viewers’ comments on the accompanying website. The study identifies the program’s positive effect on destination image and demonstrates that not only the content itself but also the way in which the series is presented contribute to positive attitudes towards the places shown. The presenter’s persona enhances the viewers’ perceived connectedness with the program and contributes to destination awareness and positive destination perceptions. Clearly, a focus on program content alone is insufficient when analyzing the impact of such television programs on destination image. Given the exploratory nature of the study, areas of further research are suggested.

Key words: Media; Destination image; Television; Documentary; Celebrity, Travel program

Address correspondence to Petra Glover, Royal Docks Business School, University of East London, 4-6 University Way, London E16 2RD, UK. Tel: +44 (0)208 223 7366; Fax: +44 (0)208 223 3395; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 16, pp. 125–138
1544-2721/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427212X13485031583902
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Missing Identity: Relocation of Budapest in Film-Induced Tourism

Anna Irimiás

Tourism Department, Kodolányi János University of Applied Sciences, Szekesfehervar, Hungary

The Hungarian capital city has been the protagonist or at least the supporting actress of numerous feature films; however, Budapest cannot be identified with a unique image to promote herself in film-induced tourism. The visual representations of the city’s symbolic economy play an important role in the creation of place identity. The purpose of this study is to analyze the identity of Budapest and its cultural landscape depicted in international and Hungarian movie productions. The article highlights the consequences of this specific use of the urban place and how these images can influence Budapest’s role in film tourism. In order to explore the potential of Budapest in the film tourism niche market, an analysis of tourists’ perception of the capital city and tourists’ attitude towards film-induced tourism was undertaken. The results of the visitor survey show that international tourists staying in Budapest would be interested to discover the film locations in the city; however, they were not able to link the titles of films set in Budapest to the real film location. Hosting international film productions clearly has a positive impact on the economy as a whole, but tourism destination marketing cannot benefit from the motion pictures’ success when Budapest interprets somewhere else.

Key words: Place identity; Displacement; Film commissions

Address correspondence to Anna Irimiás, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Tourism Department, Kodolányi János University of Applied Sciences, Furdo utca 1, Szekesfehervar H-8000, Hungary. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 16, pp. 139–150
1544-2721/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427212X13485031583939
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright ©2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Film Tourism Event Longevity: Lost in Mayberry

Stefanie Benjamin,* Paige P. Schneider,† and Derek H. Alderman‡

*School of Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA
†Department of Recreation and Leisure Studies and Center for Sustainable Tourism, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA
‡Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA

The purpose of this study is to examine a US festival widely known for attracting television fan tourists, build a traveler profile or typology of festival goers, and reflect on how the behavioral segmentation of these tourists may affect the longevity of the film tourism event and the broader planning of the destination community. Specifically, this study examines the Mayberry Days Festival, an annual event held in Mount Airy, North Carolina. Mount Airy is the birthplace and boyhood home of actor, Andy Griffith, whose television series (The Andy Griffith Show) was set in the fictional hamlet of Mayberry. Online survey invitation cards were distributed during the 2010 Mayberry Days Festival to gather data on the sociodemographic characteristics, motivations, perceptions, and economic impact of the attendee to comprehend how sustainable the Mayberry Days Festival will be for Mount Airy. Results suggest that visitors are drawn to Mount Airy for a variety of reasons and that The Andy Griffith Show is not necessarily the main motivator. It is important for the town’s tourism promoters not to get “lost in Mayberry” as they plan for alternative marketing and attraction development in the future.

Key words: Film-induced tourism; Festivals; Tourist profiles; Sustainability; Tourist motivations

Address correspondence to Stefanie Benjamin, M.S., Ph.D. Student, Hospitality Management, School of Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management, University of South Carolina, Carolina Coliseum, 701 Assembly Street, Columbia, SC 29201, USA. Tel: 305-342-5157; E-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it