Tourism Analysis 17(5) Abstracts

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Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 559–571
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X13485873913769
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Measuring the Economic Impact of Migration-Induced Tourism

Peter Forsyth,* Larry Dwyer,† Neelu Seetaram,‡ and Brian King§

*Department of Economics, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
†School of Business, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
‡School of Tourism, Bournemouth University, Poole, UK
§School of Hotel and Tourism Management, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong

Migration induces inbound and outbound tourism flows for a country heavily reliant on migration, such as Australia. Previous research has provided estimates for Australia of the effects of changes in migration on the volume of inbound and outbound tourism. When supplemented with information about tourist spending, estimates can be made of any expenditure changes associated with migration-induced tourism. Such migration-induced tourism expenditures will have economic impacts on the economy. This study estimates the economic impacts of migration-induced inbound and outbound tourism flows using a computable general equilibrium (CGE) model for Australia projecting the effects on key economic variables such as real GDP, real value added, economic welfare, and employment.

Key words: Australia; Tourism; Migration; Economic impacts; Computable general equilibrium model

Address correspondence to Peter Forsyth, Department of Economics, Monash University, Clayton Vic 3800, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 573–585
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X13485873913804
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Impact of TV Drama Attributes on Touristic Experiences at Film Tourism Destinations

Sangkyun (Sean) Kim

Department of Tourism, School of Humanities, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia

The nature of film tourism phenomena has a close relationship with visual, aural, and textual media representations and aesthetic values of media program production. However, little research has explored how and to what extent such production values or attributes of media program influence, shape, and contextualize tourists’ experiences at filmed locations. This current research addresses this paucity, and aims to empirically investigate the dimensions of production values and on-site film tourists’ experiences and examine their relationships. Adopting a structured quantitative survey, the exploratory factor analysis identifies two salient dimensions to represent the production values of a TV drama, namely Story and Character and Locations and Aesthetic Effects. While previous research suggested that spectacular scenery and natural backdrop was considered as a major motivational driver in influencing audience’s visit to film tourism destinations, the results of this study indicated that the dimension of Story and Character played the most significant role in explaining the level of on-site film tourists’ experiences. Findings offer important implications for destination marketers and researchers in relation to better understanding of film tourism and its touristic experiences.

Key words: Production values; TV drama; Film tourism; International audience; Tourist experience; Asia

Address correspondence to Dr. Sangkyun (Sean) Kim, Senior Lecturer in Tourism, Department of Tourism, School of Humanities, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia. Tel: +61 (0) 8 8201 3039; Fax: +61 (0) 8 8201 3635; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 587–599
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X13485873913840
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Examining a Supply-Side Predictive Model in Tourism Using Partial Least Squares Path Modeling: An Empirical Analysis at the Country Aggregate Level

Guy Assaker* and Rob Hallak†

*Business School, Lebanese American University (LAU), Byblos, Lebanon
†Centre for Tourism & Leisure Management, School of Management, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

This study examines the predictive relationships between tourism supply factors and tourism demand. Based on data from 154 countries, partial least squares path modeling (PLSPM) was used to test a predictive model that examines causal relationships among the environment, economy, infrastructure, and tourism demand at the aggregate country level. The results suggest that the latent economy variable (operationalized in this study as a formative, rather than a reflective, construct) has a positive, indirect effect on tourism demand. This relationship is mediated by the infrastructure and the environment, which in turn have a positive, direct effect on tourism demand, respectively. Results from this study support the operationlization of the “economy” construct as a formative construct where consumer price index (CPI), purchasing power parity (PPP), foreign direct investment (FDI), trade (TRA), and industry value added (IVA) all “form” the latent economy variable. Tourism demand, however, is a “reflective” latent construct represented by international tourist arrivals (TA) and international tourist receipts (TEXP). Thus, this predictive model presents a number of theoretical and practical contributions. First, this research expands existing theories on tourism demand by presenting a more accurate predictive model that examines the casual relationships among the economy, infrastructure, environment, and tourism. Second, understanding these complex relationships provides destination managers with an analytical framework on how certain factors can strengthen tourism demand for the destination.

Key words: Tourism demand modeling; Partial least squares path modeling (PLSPM); Formative constructs; Predictive relationships

Address correspondence to Rob Hallak, Ph.D., Lecturer in Management, School of Management, University of South Australia, GPO Box 2471, City West Campus, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia. Tel: +61 8 8302 0474; Fax: +61 8 8302 0512; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 601–616
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X13485873913886
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Second-Home Ownership and Place Attachment: Drivers of Visitation, Word-of-Mouth Promotion, and Hosting

Brumby McLeod* and James A. Busser†

*School of Business, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC, USA
†William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV, USA

This study examined the role of nonresident home owners in Costa Rica using a theoretical model based on a two-dimensional construct of place attachment. Place identity and place dependence were examined as drivers of visitation, word-of-mouth promotion, and hosting. The findings of this study support a two-dimensional place attachment construct and suggest that the place identity dimension is the primary driver of visitation and word-of-mouth promotion among current nonresident home owners. The study also revealed diminishing word-of-mouth promotion as visitation increased. The study introduces a new construct, hosting, and examines the role of visitation and word-of-mouth promotion on hosting visiting friends and relatives. The results and discussion provide important theoretical and managerial implications for tourism.

Key words: Place identity; Place dependence; Visitation; Hosting; Word-of-mouth promotion

Address correspondence to Brumby McLeod, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, School of Business, College of Charleston, 5 Liberty Street, Room 326, Charleston, SC 29401, USA. Tel: 843-953-0735; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 617–627
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X13485873913921
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Experience Quality in the Different Phases of a Tourist Vacation: A Case of Northern Norway

Nina K. Prebensen,* Eunju Woo,† Joseph S. Chen,‡ and Muzaffer Uysal†

*Tromsø University Business School, University of Tromso, Breivika, Norway
†Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, Pamplin College of Business, Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University, Blacksburg, VA, USA
‡Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Studies, Indiana University at Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, USA

The overall goal of this study is to explore the relative importance different groups of tourists give to the vacation experience phases (pretrip, en-route, and on-site experiences). By clustering the tourist by their motivation and subsequently testing the relative importance given to the various trip phases, the idea is to get new knowledge in terms of quality perceptions of the different phases of a journey, not only on-site experiences for different tourist segments. The tourist journey is divided into three phases: pretrip experience, en-route trip experience, and destination on-site experiences. Factor analysis of motivation items resulted in four groupings of motivation factors: “Personal enrichment,” “Escape,” “Socialization,” and “Family togetherness.” Cluster analysis based on factor scores of the motivation items identified two segments. Segment I included 161 respondents (28% of the sampled visitors); Segment II contained 418 (72% of the sampled visitors). The two motivation-based segments were then examined and profiled with quality elements of the three trip phases, visitor’s demographic, and behavior variables. The results show that tourists value the various phases of the journey differently based on their motivation to travel. The study results are discussed in terms practical implication for the tourism industry to enhance the total experience quality of a journey by including all the phases of a vacation trip.

Key words: Motivation; Pretrip experience; En-route experience; Destination on-site experience; Factor analysis; Cluster analysis

Address correspondence to Nina K. Prebensen, Ph.D., Tromsø University Business School, University of Tromso, Breivika, Norway. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 629–642
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X13485873913967
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Organizational-Level RFID Technology Adoption in the Hospitality Industry

Ahmet Bulent Ozturk,* Radesh Palakurthi,† and Murat Hancer‡

*Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA
†The Kemmons Wilson School of Hospitality and Resort Management, Fogelman College of Business and Economics, Memphis, TN, USA
‡School of Hotel and Restaurant Administration, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, USA

The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of technological, organizational, and environmental factors on the hospitality operators’ adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. Based on a sample of 125 technology decision makers at major hospitality corporations in the US, the results of the study indicated that except stakeholder pressure, all of the technological, organizational, and environmental factors had significant impact on hospitality operators’ intention to adopt RFID technology. By identifying the factors affecting hospitality operators’ RFID technology adoption decisions, technology vendors could design appropriate marketing strategies to reach potential adopters and they could educate these adopters better on the benefits of RFID technologies in order to increase the usage of these technologies in the hospitality industry.

Key words: Radio frequency identification (RFID); Technology adoption; Hospitality

Address correspondence to Ahmet Bulent Ozturk, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, 9907 Universal Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32819, USA. Tel: 407-903-8215; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 643–657
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X13485873914001
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

To What Extent Do Wineries Study Their Consumers and Visitors? Implications for Wine Tourism Development

Abel Duarte Alonso,*† Alessandro Bressan,* Michelle O’Shea,* and Vlad Krajsic*

*School of Business, University of Western Sydney, Penrith South DC, NSW, Australia
†School of Marketing, Tourism and Leisure, Edith Cowan University, Western Australia

In their quest for long-term sustainability and financial success, winery entrepreneurs increasingly perceive wine tourism and tourism-related enterprises as important facets of their business strategy. However, to benefit from wine tourism activities, winery operators will need to develop new skills and business capabilities. In this context, learning from and understanding consumers and visitors’ preferences and expectations is of paramount importance to wineries’ long-term sustainability and, importantly, their financial success. This study examines the extent to which winery owners and managers “study” their visitors, gathering data from 451 Italian, Spanish, and New World small and medium wineries. The majority of respondents indicate studying visitors to some extent; however, one third do not actively engage in activities that enable them to learn about visitor preferences and experiences, while over 40% would like to learn more about them. In addition, while respondents generally perceive studying visitors as beneficial, others are either skeptical or consider their current efforts sufficient. At a time when consumers have numerous leisure choices available to them, wineries and wine labels are operating in a highly competitive and increasingly sophisticated environment, these findings have significant implications for wine tourism specifically, as well as the hospitality and wine sectors generally.

Key words: Wine sector; Wine tourism; Winery consumers and visitors (CsVs); Wineries; Study of visitors; Old World; New World

Address correspondence to Abel Duarte Alonso, Ph.D., Researcher and Lecturer, University of Western Sydney, School of Business, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith South DC, NSW 2571, Australia. Tel: (02)-9685-9436; Fax: (02)-9685-9593; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 659–671
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X13485873914047
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Casino Development and Visitor Satisfaction: A Case of Korea

Woo-Hee Byun,* Bon-Ki Koo,* and Timothy Jeonglyeol Lee†

*Tourism Management, Gyeongju University, Gyeongju, Korea
†Tourism and Hospitality Management, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University (APU), Beppu, Japan

As the only casino in the country to accept domestic patronage, Korea’s Kangwon Land Casino was first introduced to revitalize a local economy no longer sustained by coal mining. In investigating this initiative, this study aims to identify the factors that attract domestic visitors to the casino, via a survey of visitors to the site and an analysis of visitor responses. The study firstly outlines and explains why a casino development was chosen to revitalize the local economy, and how areas formally classified for mining were rejuvenated and newly designated districts of tourism and tourism promotion. The investigation then presents the core findings of the study, focusing on visitor satisfaction to the site, along with areas of the site requiring further improvement based on the findings. In sum, the study assists planners to more successfully develop casinos in coordination with local residents, enhancing the capacity of casino developments to revitalize local areas in the longer term. The study offers valuable suggestions for casino development, above all in its initial stages and especially within Asian contexts.

Key words: Casino; Local development; Gambling visitor; Satisfaction; Korea

Address correspondence to Timothy Jeonglyeol Lee, Ph.D., Tourism and Hospitality Management, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University (APU), Beppu, 874-8577 Japan. Tel: +81 977 78 1224; Fax: +81 977 78 1121; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 673–677
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X13485873914083
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Eilat Syndrome: Deviant Behavior Among Temporary Hotel Workers

Yaniv Belhassen

Department of Hotel and Tourism Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, Israel

Based on primary and secondary data, it is argued that the unique characteristics of Eilat as a remote resort town situated on the historical and cultural margins of Israeli society combine to produce a liminal image that attracts hotel employees prone to substance abuse during what they view as a temporary sojourn in the city. In addition, this liminal image presumably shapes the perception of these temporary employees regarding their sojourn in the town on a transitional job during the period of time between their national/military service and civilian life. This article delineates the sociocultural, organizational, and legal conditions leading to the occurrence of this behavioral syndrome.

Key words: Temporary employees; Eliat, Israel; Liminal image; Behavioral syndrome

Address correspondence to Yaniv Belhassen, Department of Hotel and Tourism Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Eilat Campus P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel. Tel: 972-8-6304517; Fax: 972-8-6304538; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 17, pp. 679–686
1083-5423/12 $60.00 + .00
DOI: 10.3727/108354212X 13485873914128
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2012 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Applications of Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling in Tourism Research: A Methodological Review

Guy Assaker,* Songshan (Sam) Huang,† and Rob Hallak†

*School of Business, Lebanese American University, Byblos, Lebanon
†Centre for Tourism & Leisure Management, School of Management, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM), as an alternative technique to traditional covariance-based structural equation modeling (CB-SEM), offers greater flexibility with regard to data assumptions and could be better harnessed by tourism researchers as a research tool. This article reviews four selected tourism articles using PLS-SEM to highlight the key methodological issues of applying the technique. In so doing, the article provides guidelines for researchers adopting PLS-SEM as a data analysis tool in tourism research, especially when data are multivariate nonnormal and the model includes formative and reflective constructs.

Key words: Partial least squares; Structural equation modeling; Tourism research

Address correspondence to Songhan (Sam) Huang, Ph.D., School of Management, University of South Australia, City West Campus, Adelaide, 5000, SA, Australia. Tel: +61 8 830 29308, Fax: +61 8 830 20512; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it