Event Management 17(1) Abstracts

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Event Management, Vol. 17, pp. 1–12
1525-9951/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599513X13623342048022
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Environmental Challenges and Championship Events: Perspectives From the Serious Dog Sport Enthusiast

Wendy Hultsman

Parks and Recreation Management, School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA

How event competitors handle social, emotional, and environmental conditions can have a significant impact on the outcome of their competitive experiences. This article is part of a larger exploration about the role of serious dog sport in shaping life choices, overcoming challenges, and learning about one’s self. It was conducted with participants at NADAC’s 10th International Championships held at Castle Rock, Colorado in 2004. As I was both a competitor in this event as well as an investigator, I have chosen to use a modified ethnographic approach. Results demonstrated the power of adaptation and coping to achieve goals as well as the role that emotions play in perceptions of accomplishments. Competitors faced challenging environmental conditions, very long hours, and unfamiliar programmatic situations. Yet, the majority of the competitors found ways to make the experience one in which they found satisfaction.

Key words: Satisfaction; Multiday events; Serious leisure; Dog sports; Environmental factors

Address correspondence to Wendy Hultsman, Associate Professor, Parks and Recreation Management, School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, 411 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85004, USA. Tel: 602-496-0179; Fax: 602-496-0953; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 17, pp. 13–26
1525-9951/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599513X13623342048059
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Resident Perceptions of Sport Mega-Events: A Host Community Perspective on the Forthcoming Commonwealth Games in Glasgow 2014

Andrew Martin and Kristin Barth

Scottish Centre of Tourism, The Robert Gordon University-Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

Special events are a popular component of tourism and economic development strategies for communities and regions in many parts of the world. Researchers continue to develop an understanding of the positive and negative aspects of the events, and to assess residents’ support and their views about impacts. This study compares and contrasts methods and theories behind sport mega-events and attitude variations among residents. The research focuses on residents of Glasgow and the upcoming Commonwealth Games 2014, highlighting their perceptions toward potential impacts. This was achieved by gathering quantitative data via 85 questionnaires and the use of a semistructured interview with a key player involved in planning and organizing for the Games. Data analysis followed the format developed in the article by Ritchie, Shipway, and Cleeve. The results indicated that generally residents were supportive of hosting the event, but were concerned over traffic congestion and parking issues and potential increases in tax. Further analysis demonstrated that perceptions were influenced by sociodemographics and external factors such as age, length of residency, involvement in sport, and tourism. It also showed that residents had little involvement or communication in decision making overall. These findings provide a basis for the organizing committee to ensure the engagement of the community as a whole to increase overall support even further. This would help to address issues and concerns of residents and may encourage the development of ideas to help lighten the actual impact of the event on the host community as the report concluded.

Key words: Host community; Commonwealth Games 2014; Perceptions; Social and economic impacts

Address correspondence to Andrew Martin, Director, Aberdeen Business School, The Robert Gordon University, Garthdee Campus, Aberdeen, Scotland AB10 7QE, UK. Tel: 01224 263036, E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 17, pp. 27–48
1525-9951/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599513X13623342048095
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

A Multidimensional Investigation of a Regional Event Portfolio: Advancing Theory and Praxis

Vassilios Ziakas

Center for Sustainable Management of Tourism, Sport and Events (CESMATSE), European University Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus

Event portfolios have remained a neglected area of study as the different event types have been studied predominantly as single events, separately from each other and with a focus on large-scale events. In addressing this omission, this study investigates a regional event portfolio in Fort Stockton, Texas by employing qualitative methods, including participant observation in a sample of six events, seven semistructured interviews with event organizers, and analysis of events’ archival documents. A dramatological perspective viewing events as dramatic stories that express versions of a community’s social order was the conceptual framework that guided the analysis of events to examine their innate interrelationships. Results show that the event portfolio amalgamates sport and cultural performances and creates a symbolic social context, hence allowing the expression of different aspects of community life. The article discusses how the interrelationships among different events engender and maintain complementarities that facilitate event implementations. It is concluded that events are interrelated both conceptually and functionally. Thematic continuities among events in the portfolio reconfirm the metaphoric messages, with each event reinforcing the claims of the others. Events are functionally interrelated by sharing common resources and elements, generating complementary markets and transferring practical know-how. This helps mobilize community resources and facilitates the synchronized use of events for achieving multiple purposes. Based on the theoretical and practical implications of the study, a multidimensional model is proposed that integrates the contextual, operational, and sociocultural dimensions of event portfolios and can guide further investigation in the management and policy research of event portfolios.

Key words: Event portfolio strategy; Relatedness; Multiplicity; Event interrelationships; Dramatological perspective; Multidimensional analysis

Address correspondence to Vassilios Ziakas, Center for Sustainable Management of Tourism, Sport and Events, Department of Management and Marketing, School of Business Administration, European University Cyprus, 6 Diogenes Street, Engomi, P. O. Box22006, 1516 Nicosia, Cyprus. Tel: +357 22713202; Fax: +357 22590539; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 17, pp. 49–61
1525-9951/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599513X13623342048149
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Indigenous Festivals and Community Development: A Sociocultural Analysis of an Australian Indigenous Festival

Michelle Whitford* and Lisa Ruhanen†

*Department of Tourism, Leisure, Hotel and Sport Management, Griffith Business School, Nathan Campus, Griffith University, Nathan, Qld, Australia
†School of Tourism, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia Campus, Brisbane, Qld, Australia

Festivals and events are widely recognized as having the potential to deliver sociocultural benefits for host communities and destinations. In countries such as Australia, Indigenous communities are looking towards festivals as vehicles to facilitate capacity building, self-determination, and reconciliation. Given this context, this article utilizes Brisbane’s Annual Sports and Cultural Festival as a case study to identify and critically examine the sociocultural benefits of festivals; and to identify and discuss those key critical factors which promote positive sociocultural benefits and sustainable community development through the staging of indigenous festivals. Through a qualitative research approach, semistructured, in-depth interviews were undertaken with 18 Queensland local and State government actors and key stakeholders of the Annual Sports and Cultural Festival. The findings revealed that the festival creates positive sociocultural benefits not only for festival participants and attendees but also for the wider indigenous community. Such benefits include the development of social capital, cultural preservation, and reconciliation, all of which are arguably significant factors in the facilitation of sustainable community development.

Key words: Indigenous festivals; Social capital; Sustainable development

Address correspondence to Dr. Lisa Ruhanen, School of Tourism, The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, General Purpose North 3 (Bld 39A), CNR of Campbell Rd and Blair Dr., Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 17, pp. 63–75
1525-9951/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599513X13623342048185
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

What Motivates Students to Volunteer at Events?

Dan Wakelin

Coventry University, London Campus, London, UK

This study investigates the motivations of student volunteers at events. An analysis of the existing literature leads to a quantitative data collection using volunteer enrolment forms at the University of Plymouth, highlighting nine categories that volunteers’ motivations can be separated into. The categories were ranked in order of importance by student experts in a Delphi study, which culminated in the production of a classification scheme for volunteer motivations. The results focused on whether the motivations are altruistic, or for a reciprocal benefit. The study concludes with a series of recommendations for volunteer managers, including the consideration of semialtruism, which occurs where a volunteer does not expect any benefit from the organization other than personal satisfaction.

Key words: Students; Volunteers; Motivation; Reciprocity; Altruism

Address correspondence to Dan Wakelin, Coventry University London Campus, East India House, 109-117 Middlesex Street, London, E1 7JF, UK. Tel: 07557 425040; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 17, pp. 77–92
1525-9951/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599513X13623342048220
E-ISSN 1943-4308
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

It’s All About the Games! 2010 Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games Volunteers

Tracey J. Dickson,* Angela M. Benson,† Deborah A. Blackman,* and F. Anne Terwiel‡

*Faculty of Business, Government and Law, University of Canberra, Canberra, Australia
†School of Service Management, University of Brighton, Eastbourne, East Sussex, England
‡Thompson Rivers University, Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Despite volunteers being essential for the success of many mega sport events, there is little known about what motivates them to volunteer at such events. This study aims to address this gap. This article commences by developing Getz’s event portfolio into a new expanded sport event typology. It continues by presenting the results to three key questions: (1) Who is volunteering? (2) What are their motivations for volunteering, and (3) What variables are most likely to be related to their intention to volunteer after the event. The study used an adaptation of the Special Event Volunteer Motivation Scale on volunteers at the 2010 Vancouver Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games. A principal components analysis of the 36 motivation items identified six factors that accounted for 58.3% of the variance, with the main factor entitled “All about the Games.” A regression analysis conducted to identify those variables most likely to indicate an intention to volunteer more after the Games demonstrated that those who could see an advantage in more volunteering pregames were most likely to intend to increase their level of volunteering postgames. People with previous volunteering experience in events, sport, or community groups were less likely to indicate they would volunteer more after the event. The results and recommendations have implications for mega-multisport event organizing committees not just in respect of event delivery but in terms of a postevent volunteer legacy.

Key words: Sport events; Volunteers; Motivations; Olympics; Paralympics; Legacy

Address correspondence to Tracey J. Dickson , Faculty of Business and Government, University of Canberra, University Avenue, Canberra, ACT, 2601, Australia. Tel: +61 412 707577; Fax: +61 2 6201 2550; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it