Tourism Culture & Communication 13(1) Abstracts

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Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 5–18
1098-304X/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13769180530567
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

A Flash of Culinary Tourism: Understanding The Influences of Online Food Photography on People’s Travel Planning Process on Flickr

Bingjie Liu,* William C. Norman,† and Lori Pennington-Gray*

*Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA
† Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA

This article presents the results of an exploratory study in the online image-sharing community Flickr. The purpose of this study was to profile the users who are fond of online food photography as well as to explore the role of online food photography in their traveling planning process. Grounded in “uses and gratification theory,” a mixed method was adopted for this research. Content analysis was employed to understand members’ general motivation to participate in different online food photography activities. A series of chi-square and independent-sample t tests was conducted to determine if significant differences existed between active members and not-as-active members. Results of the quantitative and qualitative analyses supported each other. The findings indicated that factors of entertainment, personal identity, and social interaction were the main drivers of participation in online food photography activities. It was further revealed that participants’ tourism experiences were recorded as personal photography but shared socially through the use of social media. For active members, food images influenced them in terms of novelty and providing information. Active members also appeared to be more likely to seek out new places to travel for new food experiences, and food photography had a greater influence on where they consider traveling. On the basis of the results, implications for culinary tourism promotion and destination marketing were discussed.

Key words: Social media; Food photography; Culinary tourism, use and gratification; Flickr

Address correspondence to Bingjie Liu, M.S., Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, 206E FLG, P.O. Box 118208, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA. Tel: +1-352-294-1676; +1-740-818-5720; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 19–27
1098-304X/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13769180530602
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Acceptance or Rejection of Social Media: A Case Study of Rochford Winery Estate in Victoria, Australia

Paul Strickland, Warwick Frost, Kim M. Williams, and Jennifer Laing

Department of Marketing and Tourism and Hospitality, Faculty of Business, Economics and Law, La Trobe Business School, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia

This article examines the acceptance and rejection of social media technology using Rochford Winery Estate in the Yarra Valley in Victoria, Australia, as a case study. The purpose of this investigation is to examine the perceptions of the seven main social media platforms and, through in-depth interviews with Rochford Winery Estate personnel, to determine if any of these platforms are actually employed to assist in increasing revenue. The results indicate that four of the seven identified platforms, being referrals, user-generated content, member profiles, and social networking, were considered worth adopting as they have the most perceived potential to assist in increasing revenue. The three rejected categories (blogs, ratings and reviews, and forums) were not seen as strong sales or marketing platforms or having direct relevance to the winery. However, the business concedes that social media may also assist in the overall marketing strategy through brand awareness. Ideally, social media would be more heavily embraced and given additional financial resources if proven increases in revenue could be obtained and overall control of their brand on the World Wide Web was achievable. The article concludes by suggesting that this winery and perhaps the wine industry are willing to embrace social media if the financial rewards outweigh the financial investment. Wine regions are generally open to cooperative marketing campaigns and there should be no difficulty in implementing social media campaigns for mutual benefit. This research may assist other wineries locally, nationally, or globally to adopt new sales techniques through social media, therefore allowing the wine industry to continue to expand and remain relevant in today’s competitive environment.

Key words: Social media; Platforms; Wineries; Web 2.0 technology; Rochford Wine Estate

Address correspondence to Paul Strickland, Department of Marketing and Tourism and Hospitality, Faculty of Business, Economics and Law, La Trobe Business School, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria 3086, Australia. Tel: +61 3 9479 5029; Fax: +61 3 9479 3669; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 29–42
1098-304X/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13769180530648
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Student Tourism and Destination Choice: Exploring the Influence of Traditional, New, and Social Media: An Australian Case Study

Rhianna Davies and Grant Cairncross

School of Tourism and Hospitality, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, Australia

Greater attention is now being given to the increasing popularity of the Internet as a communication tool, particularly social media and other forms of user-generated content (UGC). Social media websites, representing various forms of UGC, are also specifically gaining considerable attention from tourists and potential tourists. Now, tourists have the option of seeking information from “new media,” such as the Internet and social media, as well as traditional media, including films, television, books, magazines, and newspapers. Whereas both new and traditional media will play key roles in influencing the destination choices of tourists, research must also consider the influence of social groups that then translates through word of mouth (WOM). The youth and student travel market is a valuable segment of the overall tourism market, although it is often dismissed or ignored by tourism operators as youth tourists are wrongly perceived as having little financial value. This is, perhaps, because youth and student tourists are generally perceived as having a low income, and thus little disposable income to contribute towards travel. This research addresses this lack of attention by examining and exploring the international destination choice influencers of students with regard to peer and social pressure, traditional WOM, online social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, and other UGC websites. The research used a qualitative, focus group study strategy. The results found that all 24 university student participants indicated some level of apprehension about the reliability of information found on the Internet and social media in particular, and there were also varying degrees of reluctance to utilize social media as a credible destination information source. This contradicts previous research suggesting young people such as university students do not generally show concern about the credibility of information found in social media.

Key words: Social media; Student tourists; Destination choice

Address correspondence to Dr. Grant Cairncross, School of Tourism and Hospitality Management, Southern Cross University, Hogbin Drive, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales 2450, Australia. Tel: +61 2 6659 3617; Fax: +61 2 6659 3206; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 43–59
1098-304X/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13769180530684
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Social Media Capital of the Universe: What Does This Mean for Brazilian Tourists to the US?

Lori Pennington-Gray and Ashley Schroeder

Tourism Crisis Management Institute, Department of Tourism Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Research has examined the role of social media during crises in various fields; however, there is a paucity of research in this area as it relates to tourism. Moreover, few studies have examined at-risk populations, such as tourists, in times of crisis. To assess the influence of risk perceptions on the likelihood to turn to various information sources in the event of a crisis during travel, a national survey of 483 Brazilian travelers to the US was conducted. Results indicated that there were two travel risk groups: low and high perceived risk. Travelers in the high perceived risk group were more likely to turn to the following information sources—television, text messages, friends/relatives, travel agents, local residents, consulate general, local law enforcement, Internet, social media, concierge, other tourists, newspaper, local tourism office, state tourism office, radio—in the event of a crisis during travel. Although the preferred crisis information sources varied somewhat by travel risk group, the most preferred sources were text messages, friends/relatives, and television.

Key words: Risk perception; Tourists; Brazilians; Information source; Crisis

Address correspondence to Lori Pennington-Gray, Tourism Crisis Management Institute, Department of Tourism Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, 325 Florida Gym, P.O. Box 118208, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA. Tel: +1 352-392-4042, +1 352-392-7588; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 61–65
1098-304X/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13769180530729
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

RESEARCH NOTE

Let’s Talk Destination: Exploring Social Media (and) Marketing Strategies for the Destination Marketing Organization VVV Hof van Twente, The Netherlands

Thijs Zwienenberg, Inge Hermann, and Christa Barkel

Hospitality Business School, Saxion University of Applied Science, Deventer, the Netherlands

Currently, social media (and) marketing appears to be one of the most popular buzzwords in the tourism industry, especially among destination marketing organizations (DMOs). This study explores various definitions of social media (and) marketing and how this strategy can be implemented within the DMO VVV Hof van Twente. Furthermore, the study elaborates on the findings from a visitor survey and benchmark study and, deriving from these insights, suggests approaches for implementing social media within the organization’s marketing strategy. This study concludes with an overview of limitations and suggestions for future research.

Key words: Social media (and) marketing strategy; Destination marketing organization (DMO); Social technographics ladder

Address correspondence to Dr. Inge Hermann, Hospitality Business School, Saxion University of Applied Science, Handelskade 75 7400 AM Deventer, the Netherlands. Tel: +31 6 304 082 12; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it