Tourism Review International 17(2) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 63-74
1544-2721/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427213X13728688260758
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Use of Urban Built Heritage for Boutique Hotels: Examples From Malaysia and Singapore

Joan C. Henderson, Geraldine Liew, Jonathan Ong, and Benjamin Quek

Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

This article examines aspects of the adaptive reuse of old buildings in historic urban districts for the purpose of boutique heritage hotels, seeking to illuminate opportunities and problems. A case study approach was employed whereby a selection of properties housed in vernacular architecture in Melaka, Penang, and Singapore were surveyed. Fieldwork was undertaken that included informal and more structured interviews with hotel owners and operators. Relevant secondary data were also analyzed. There appears to be a growing demand for and supply of boutique heritage hotels, characterized by smallness of size and distinctiveness expressed in the occupation of converted older buildings. Heritage is a key element, although it may be fused with modern design, and these enterprises have the potential to contribute to urban conservation and sustainability. Insights are afforded into the boutique heritage hotel trend within a Southeast Asian context, highlighting some of the challenges confronting both hoteliers and authorities.

Key words: Adaptive reuse; Boutique hotel; Built heritage; Conservation; Southeast Asia

Address correspondence to Joan C. Henderson, Associate Professor, Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798. Tel: 6790 6116; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 75-88
1544-2721/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427213X13728688260794
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

The Perceived Risks of Traveling Overseas: Evidence From Korea

Sarah Ryu,* Brian King,† and Segu Zuhair‡

*Department of Tourism & Hospitality, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
†School of Hotel and Tourism Management, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong SAR, China
‡College of Business, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia

This article investigated destination-related risk perceptions among two groups of Korean residents: those who have no previous experience of overseas travel and those who have traveled overseas but not to Australia. An analysis of 810 respondents to a questionnaire-based survey concluded that the two groupings view Australia as less risky than international destinations generally. Both respondent groupings cited financial risks as a strong deterrent to overseas travel, although inexperienced travelers expressed more concern about the prospective culture-related risks associated with travel to Australia. Experienced travelers expressed a lesser likelihood of encountering crime during a trip to Australia than in the case of other destinations, whereas inexperienced travelers perceived alternative destinations as equally risky, perhaps indicative of their incapacity to discriminate. The findings suggest that the experience of overseas travel increases awareness of the potential dangers and hazards that may be encountered in destination settings, which generates perceptions of risk that are closer to reality. It is suggested that tourism authorities should take note of this and direct scarce resources toward prospective market segments who have more realistic views about the destination.

Key words: Travel risk; Risk factors; Destination choice

Address correspondence to Dr. Sarah Ryu, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Department of Tourism & Hospitality, International College of I-Shou University, No. 1, Section 1, Syuecheng Road, Dashu District, Kaohsiung City 84001, Taiwan, R.O.C. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 89-101
1544-2721/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427213X13728688260875
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Pricing Guidelines for Graded Hotels and Guesthouses in South Africa

Engelina Du Plessis and Melville Saayman

Tourism Research in Economic Environs and Society (TREES), School of Business Management, North West University, Potchefstroom, Republic of South Africa

Pricing accommodation is a complex process. This study attempted to provide guidelines for determining competitive prices for hotels and guesthouses in South Africa, the two types of accommodation that hold the largest share of the South African market. A survey was conducted in cooperation with the major role players in South Africa’s accommodation sector: the South African Tourism Service Association (SATSA), the Federated Hospitality Association of Southern Africa (FEDHASA), and the Tourism Grading Council of South Africa (TGCSA). A total of 2,288 questionnaires were sent out via e-mail and 247 were returned completed. The significance of the mean price differences of the star grading levels was tested, and hotels and guesthouses were compared using an independent t test. A significant difference was found between the prices of hotels and guesthouses, especially in the five-star category. The study also revealed a 20% difference between the prices of the star categories. The pricing guidelines provided here can sustain competitiveness with growing profitability.

Key words: Accommodation sector; Price strategies; Price methods; Price competitiveness; Grading; t Test

Address correspondence to Dr. Engelina du Plessis, Senior Lecturer, Tourism, Research in Economic Environs and Society (TREES), School of Business Management, North West University, Hoffmanstreet 11, Potchefstroom 2520, Republic of South Africa. Tel: +27 18 299 1497; Fax: +27 18 299 4140; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 103-113
1544-2721/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427213X13728688260910
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Community Tourism Awareness Campaign: Eden District Municipality, South Africa’s Example

T. Ramukumba

School of Economics, Development and Tourism, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), Port Elizabeth, Republic of South Africa

Although there is an increasing community understanding of the benefits tourism brings to communities, there are still many who are yet to appreciate the significance of tourism, including policy makers and the general public. Because community support, or lack of it, can have a significant effect on the success or failure of a tourist destination, awareness-raising activities about the significance of tourism play a crucial role in the future development of the industry. Ironically, it is a role that is still not fully appreciated by many in the industry. Tourism is simultaneously portrayed as a destroyer of culture, undermining social norms and economies, degrading social structures, stripping communities of individuality, and as a savior of the poor and disadvantaged, providing opportunities and economic benefits, promoting social exchange, and enhancing livelihoods. Therefore, the study focused on evaluating the accessibility and effectiveness of the different communication mediums that are used by the Eden District Municipality to raise community tourism awareness. The study used surveys because they are commonly used for collecting data within the field of tourism and hospitality. For purposes of this research, a descriptive survey was conducted. The study found that across the different stakeholders in the tourism industry of the Eden District Municipality, there was a significant difference statistically on their views on mediums used to communicate community-based tourism issues, both benefits and costs, and the accessibility of the mediums used as well as the effectiveness of the medium used to communicate the benefits and costs of community-based tourism.

Key words: Community tourism; Communication mediums; Benefits of tourism; Tourism industry

Address correspondence to T. Ramukumba, School of Economics, Development and Tourism, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU), Port Elizabeth, 6031, Republic of South Africa. Tel: +27 44 8015572; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 115-129
1544-2721/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427213X13728688260956
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Sagarmatha National Park (Mount Everest) Visitor Survey and Analysis (Everest Visitor Survey)

Paolo Caroli,* Daniele Panzeri,* and Barry Haack†

*CESVI, Bergamo, Italy
†Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA

Tourists are very important components in the Nepalese Sagarmatha National Park (SNP) (Mount Everest) economy and landscape. For improved management of SNP, more information on the visitors is necessary, and therefore a questionnaire was administered to over 5,000 visitors to obtain their profile, trekking destinations, problems encountered, and suggestions for improvements within the park. The questionnaire had two components, the first on park entrance and the second on park exit. Six countries, UK, US, Germany, Japan, France, and Australia, accounted for over 50% of the visitors to SNP, and visitors had an average visit of about 15 days. Interestingly, 14% of those surveyed had previously visited SNP. The primary suggestions for improvements are quality of toilets, better hygiene and water, and waste management. The survey results provide useful baseline information and suggestions for changes and have also been incorporated into system dynamics models to evaluate management options within the park.

Key words: Sagarmatha; Mount Everest; Himalayas; Nepal; Tourism; Trekkers; Questionnaire

Address correspondence to Barry Haack, Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University, MSN 6C3, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA. Tel: +1 703 993 1215; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 131-135
1544-2721/13 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427213X13728688260992
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2013 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

RESEARCH NOTE

Policy and Tourism Development as Exemplified by the Lublin Region (Southeast Poland)

Andrzej Tucki and Andrzej Świeca

Department of Regional Geography and Tourism, Faculty for Geosciences and Spatial Management, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin, Lublin, Poland

Since the late 1980s a number of countries in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) have emerged from an environment of centralized planning to models closer to Western European ones. This process of transformation occurred specially at a regional level, where tourism is examined as a vehicle for sustainable development especially in Europe’s less developed regions. Within this context, local authorities’ role in tourism development is examined. In this study it was assumed that tourist policy is composed of three fundamental groups of components: the activity of local authority and management of tourism in the municipality; promotion and information; cooperation. The relevant data reflect the socioeconomic changes that have been taking place in Poland for about 15 years at the central and local level.

Key words: Local authority; Tourist policy; Poland

Address correspondence to Andrzej Tucki, Associate Professor, Ph.D., Department of Regional Geography and Tourism, Faculty for Geosciences and Spatial Management, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University in Lublin, Lublin, Poland. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it