Tourism Culture & Communication 13(2) Abstracts

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Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 67–77
1098-304X/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13848886455100
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Ethnic Cultures, Globalization, and Tourism: Eurasians in Singapore

Joan C. Henderson

Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

The subject of the article is ethnic groups and the manner in which their cultures are presented as tourist attractions, a topic explored within the wider framework of the debate about the relationship between the forces of localization and globalization. Specific reference is made to conditions in Singapore and its minority community of Eurasians who tend to be overlooked in comparison to the three main races of Chinese, Malays, and Indians. Globalization and international tourism, the latter a cause and consequence of the former, are seen to have the capacity to both threaten and help safeguard ethnic cultures. Eurasians receive comparatively little attention in destination promotion and this is indicative of the small size of the population and the hybrid nature of the culture. However, they merit attention as an interesting indigenous culture that embodies local distinctiveness.

Key words: Ethnic cultures; Eurasians; Globalization; Singapore

Address correspondence to Joan C. Henderson, Associate Professor, Nanyang Business School, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798. Tel: 65 6790 6116; Fax: 65 67992 4217; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 79–94
1098-304X/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13848886455155
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Concepts of Culture and Tourism Adaption to Climate Change in Tuvalu

Anna Hübner

Department of Culture and Global Studies, Aalborg University, Ballerup, Denmark

In the context of a changing climate, the tourism industry has increasingly been given attention due to its considerable contributions in accelerating climate change and to its susceptibility towards current and projected social, economic, and environmental impacts. Accordingly, studies examining adaptation strategies to mitigate effects and on barriers for implementation at destinations have been carried out to a greater extent. Likewise, this study will explore current impediments to taking action, looking more closely at the tourism industry of the small island state of Tuvalu. Although tourism is recognized to drive future economic growth of the island nation, proactive adaptation to climate change has been limited. Hence, key drivers for (non)proactive responses of tourism actors are explored by utilizing a cultural framework. Semistructured interviews were carried out with the National Tourist Office and with tourism service providers, concentrating on the investigation of assumptions (of artifacts, symbols, and values) held about climate change as well as on external stakeholder pressures (such as the government, the community, or the media). Cultural Theory and its proposed typologies then serve as a tool to help identify reaction groups within Tuvalu’s tourism industry. Unlike looking at the more tangible elements impeding adaptation, the examination of barriers to proactiveness underlain by different values and beliefs may serve as a somewhat different approach.

Key words: Climate change; Cultural theory; Tourism adaptation; Tuvalu; Small island developing states (SIDS)

Address correspondence to Anna Hübner at her current address: Kapitän-Borgwardt-Weg, Warnemünde, Germany. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 95–112
1098-304X/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13848886455227
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Taxi Tour Guides as Culture Brokers on Jeju Island in South Korea

So Young Bae,* Erwei Dong,† Garry Chick,* and Deborah Kerstetter*

*Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Management, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA
†Department of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Studies, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL, USA

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of taxi tour guides (TTGs) as culture brokers on Jeju Island in South Korea. A qualitative approach via in-depth interviews was utilized to describe domestic tourists’ travel experiences with TTGs, and TTGs’ perception of their roles. Weiler and Yu’s dimensions of tour guides’ cultural mediation (i.e., mediating access, understanding, and encounter) were referenced when analyzing the results and assessing how TTGs play a role as culture brokers in a domestic tourism context. The results revealed the importance of mediating understanding, recognizing TTGs’ locality in culture brokering, and responding to constraints that discourage TTGs from acting as culture brokers.

Key words: Culture brokers; Taxi tour guides; Jeju Island; South Korea; Domestic tourism; Dimensions of cultural mediation

Address correspondence to So Young Bae, Ph.D., Department of Recreation, Park and Tourism Management, The Pennsylvania State University, 801C Ford Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA. Tel: 814-404-5987; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 113–123
1098-304X/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13848886455272
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourist Visitation to Ebenezer Aboriginal Mission Station, Victoria, Australia, 1859–1904: A Case Study

Ian D. Clark* and Eva Mcrae-Williams†

*Business Faculty, Federation University Australia, Ballarat, Australia
†Division of Research, Teaching & Learning, Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education, Batchelor, Australia

This article investigates the phenomenon of tourist visitation to an Aboriginal Mission Station in the Wimmera region of Victoria, Australia, during its operation from 1859 to 1904. It provides an overview of the history of tourism to Aboriginal missions in Victoria and presents the first detailed study of tourism to the Ebenezer Mission site. It shows that in contrast with other mission stations in Victoria, where tourism was encouraged, the Moravian missionaries discouraged visitation and deliberately selected a remote location in northwest Victoria to ensure their isolation. Nevertheless, a limited number of visitors were welcomed on to the station and their accounts are presented in this case study.

Key words: Indigenous tourism; Aboriginal missions; Ebenezer; Moravian missionaries

Address correspondence to Ian D. Clark, Business Faculty, Federation University Australia, PO Box 663, Ballarat, Victoria 3353, Australia. Tel: (03) 5327 9436; Fax: (03) 5327 9405; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 13, pp. 127–137
1098-304X/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830413X13848886455182
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Critical Review

Between You and Me: Making Messes With Constructivism and Critical Theory

Kellee Caton

Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism, Thompson Rivers University, British Columbia, Canada

New social science researchers often grapple with questions of scholarly identity and paradigm belongingness in a postmodern world. On one hand, there are perhaps more options than ever, in terms of philosophical orientations to research that are taken seriously across the landscape of social scholarly disciplines. On the other hand, however, these philosophical orientations (typically presented as paradigms) have solidified to such a degree in writing and teaching on qualitative inquiry that they can feel confining, leading students to feel that more than one “paradigm” resonates with their personal sensibilities, and therefore to wonder where the points of tension actually lie between different orientations to research—for indeed, what is learned in the classroom about convergences and divergences between research perspectives is sometimes not borne out in our lived experiences in the field. In this critical review article, which is meant to be both a personal reflection and an analytical methodology exploration, the author engages in an exercise of “rethinking,” in which she questions earlier claims regarding the tension between two increasingly popular research approaches in her own field of tourism studies—namely, constructivism and critical theory—and attempts to interrogate what is really at stake between these perspectives. Ultimately, the author concludes that the tension between these two traditions may lie in a surprising place: it may not be ontological, and not necessarily even political, but pedagogical and care oriented. She then ponders the inherent challenge that lies in the tension between these two perspectives, in terms of the quest to forge a social research approach that is reflexive, critically and politically oriented, and respectful of participants and their lived experiences. By situating her analysis within the context of her own doctoral research project, she hopes not only to capture the analytical dimension of working at a methodological crossroads, but also to offer a window into the ways that such issues are worked through in our own respective and embodied research journeys. (Abstract by A.-M.H.)

Key words: Paradigm debate; Qualitative research; Reflexivity; Research ethics; Researcher–participant relationship; Scholarly identity

Address correspondence to Kellee Caton, Faculty of Adventure, Culinary Arts and Tourism, Thompson Rivers University, 900 McGill Road, Kamloops, British Columbia, V2C 0C8, Canada. Tel: 250-852-7630; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it