Tourism Review International 17(4) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 223-236
1544-2721/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X13910101597085
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Community Expectations From Rural Tourism Development at Lekhubu Island, Botswana

Monkgogi Lenao,*† Joseph E. Mbaiwa,‡§ and Jarkko Saarinen†§

*Department of Tourism & Hospitality, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana
†Department of Geography, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
‡Okavango Research Institute, University of Botswana, Gaborone, Botswana
§School of Tourism and Hospitality, Faculty of Management, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

This article uses the community-based tourism (CBT) and the rural development approach to analyze community expectations from a CBT project at Lekhubu Island by the Mmatshumu Village, Botswana. This is a qualitative study that utilizes secondary data sources, focus group discussions, in-depth and key informant interviews, and informal interviews as well as observations. Results suggest a considerable degree of positivity among members of the community in terms of deriving economic benefits such as employment and infrastructural development. While this is desirable and expected for a CBT project, there is need to inform the communities about trade-offs that they may have to contend with when the project and related tourist activities evolve and expand.

Key words: Community expectations; Rural tourism development; Community-based tourism (CBT); Tourism impacts; Tourism awareness; Botswana

Address correspondence to Monkgogi Lenao, M.Sc., Lecturer, Tourism & Hospitality, Department of Tourism & Hospitality, University of Botswana, Box 202331, Gaborone, Botswana. Tel: +267 355 2114; Fax: +267 355 4666; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 237-251
1544-2721/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X13910101597120
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

An Analysis of Critical Success Factors in Managing the Tourist Experience at Kruger National Park

W. H. Engelbrecht, M. Kruger, and M. Saayman

Tourism Research in Economic Environs and Society (TREES), North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

Kruger National Park (KNP) attracts over 1 million tourists per annum and is one of the top fiveinternational destinations in South Africa. However, there is a lot of competition in South Africa and, together with the 22 national parks managed by SANParks, there are also local and provincial parks and more than 9,000 game farms with neighboring countries such as Namibia, Zimbabwe, and Botswana competing for ecotourists. This implies the need for higher quality products and services that must be delivered to the tourist to fulfill the expectations of tourists. This can be achieved by determining the critical success factors (CSFs) in managing the tourist experience at KNP, since knowledge of these factors can lead to a satisfied tourist experience that will keep visitors loyal to the park and thus ensure the competitiveness and sustainability of the KNP. The purpose of this research is therefore to determine the CSFs of managing the tourist experience at KNP. To achieve this goal, a questionnaire survey was conducted at KNP from December 27, 2010 to January 4, 2011. Questionnaires were distributed at the chalets and camping areas in the following rest camps: Skukuza (152), Berg & Dal (98), Lower Sabie (85), and Satara (101). A total of 436 questionnaires were obtained from the rest camps. The results showed that nine CSFs can be identified, which KNP management can use to improve on quality service delivery, giving the tourists a memorable experience at KNP. Three of the nine CSFs that have not yet been identified in previous research are wildlife experience, interpretation, and luxuries.

Key words: Factor analysis; Nature-based tourism; National park management; Sustainability; Tourist experience; Tourist satisfaction; Critical success factors (CSFs)

Address correspondence to M. Kruger, Tourism Research in Economic Environs and Society (TREES), North-West University, Private Bag x6001, Potchefstroom 2520, South Africa. Tel: +27 18 299 1980; Fax: +27 18 299 4140; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 253-265
1544-2721/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X13910101597166
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Global Imaging and Branding: Source Market Newspaper Reporting of the 2010 FIFA World Cup

Sanette L. A. Ferreira and Ronnie Donaldson

Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Stellenbosch, Stellenbosch, South Africa

Hallmark events can act as a means to enhance a destination’s image and ideology. In this case study, newspaper articles were analyzed to show the main messages and discourses on how the newspaper media of the country’s main visitor source markets (UK, North America, Germany, and Netherlands) portrayed South Africa during the event. In this context articles are seen as independent or autonomous sources of image agents. The main methods of analysis were content and discourse analyses. These analyses have revealed that the positive and neutral content messages dominate the constructed images/pictures. On average, the most negative core market newspaper reporting originated from the UK and US, although there are major discrepancies in some of the negatively reported themes. The mega-event of 2010 has engendered a new image of South Africa globally but the long-term impact of such events on the image of this destination is doubtful.

Key words: Hallmark event; Printed media; Destination image; Newspapers; Image agents; South Africa

Address correspondence to Sanette Ferreira, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, Private Bag X1, Matieland, 7600, South Africa. Tel: +27 21 8083105; Fax: +27 21 8083109; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 267-282
1544-2721/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X13910101597201
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourism Visioning: Implementing a Primary Stakeholder Approach

Cody Morris Paris,*† Richard C. Knopf,‡ and Kathleen Andereck‡

*Middlesex University Dubai, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
†University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
‡School of Community Resources and Development, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA

Following a discussion on the relationship between participatory planning, collaboration, and tourism visioning, this article describes the development of a tourism-specific visioning process. A case study of a facilitated tourism visioning process in the city of Surprise, Arizona, USA is presented. This case study provides an example of the potential power of the visioning process for a destination community developing a tourism vision to guide collaborative tourism planning. Insights from three stakeholder workshops are discussed in two contexts: (1) long-term recommendations of what is needed for implementing a successful tourism visioning process and development of a community tourism plan, and (2) a manageable set of short-term “successes” that could be accomplished by stakeholders collaborating to establish a tourism vision.

Key words: Tourism planning; Community development; Community goals; Case study; Capacity building

Address correspondence to Cody Morris Paris, Ph.D., Senior Lecturer of Social Science, Middlesex University Dubai, Knowledge Village, Block 16, PO Box 500697, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Tel: +971 04 433 1776; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 283-298
1544-2721/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X13910101597247
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Happiness, Satisfaction, and Risk Perception

Sebastian Filep,*† Louise Munk Klint,† Paul Whitelaw,† Dale Dominey-Howes,‡ and Terry DeLacy†

*Department of Tourism, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand
†Centre for Tourism and Services Research, College of Business, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia
‡The School of Geosciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia

This article examines the relationship between reported levels of happiness, satisfaction, and risk perceptions during holiday experiences. Empirical examinations of this relationship have received limited attention by researchers, yet examining this topic has theoretical and practical value. Specifically, the purpose of our study was to examine perceptions of risk to holiday activities and hazards, levels of hedonic satisfaction and positive emotions, and sense of engagement and meaning in life as three core elements of happiness for international tourists visiting Vanuatu. The research method consisted of a 100-item self-completed questionnaire; the questionnaire items were based on consumer behavior, psychology, hazard, and risk perception literatures. Results show that our international tourist respondents report high levels of happiness and hedonic satisfaction, perceive the majority of holiday activities as safe, and regard the majority of hazards as posing no threat to their tourist experiences. The study suggests that personal characteristics may influence satisfaction, happiness levels, and risk perceptions, but significant correlations among satisfaction, happiness, and risk perceptions are limited. Theoretically, the study contributes to the growing literature on risk and satisfaction in tourism. Practical recommendations arising from this study include targeted education and awareness campaigns.

Key words: Tourist experiences; Satisfaction; Happiness; Risk perceptions

Address correspondence to Sebastian Filep, Department of Tourism, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand. Tel: + 64 3 479 5403; Fax: + 64 3 479 9034; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 17, pp. 299-306
1544-2721/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X13910101597283
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Competitive Advantage for Brand Positioning: The Case of Sun City in South Africa

Ikechukwu O. Ezeuduji, Prisca M. Lete, Maisa Correia, and Anna-Marie Taylor

School of Tourism and Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

The Sun City holiday resort in South Africa offers a combination of various entertainment and relaxation opportunities as well as attractions and activities for different market segments. This study explored the linkages between resources, capabilities, and competitive advantage of Sun City holiday resort to evaluate the static or dynamic nature of its destination capabilities. A desk study and in-depth interviews with 10 business managers were conducted, and a content analysis established this destination’s strategic resources and how these are combined to generate dynamic organizational capabilities from which Sun City derives its competitive advantage. Sun City competes in the tourism industry by pursuing strong branding and dominating a niche tourism market of resort vacationers, offering a rare package of so many experiences. If Sun City is to strive after new capabilities according to changing environments and markets, a strong brand that addresses the customer value position (many thrills and long-term memories) can help to attract repeated visitors, while fostering its brand promise of “Africa’s kingdom of pleasure.”

Key words: Strategy; Key success factors; Competitive advantage; Capability; Resources

Address correspondence to Ikechukwu O. Ezeuduji, School of Tourism and Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, P. O. Box 524, Auckland Park, 2006 Johannesburg, South Africa. Tel: +27 11 559 1595; Fax: +27 11 559 1011; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it