Tourism Analysis 19(1) Abstracts

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Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 1–17
1083-5423/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X13927625340073
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Integrated Destination Competitiveness Model: Testing Its Validity and Data Accessibility

Larry Dwyer,*† Ljubica Knežević Cvelbar,† Tanja Mihalič,† and Matjaž Koman†

*School of Marketing, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia
†Faculty of Economics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Destination competitiveness has attracted much attention from researchers over the past two decades. The Integrated Destination Competitiveness Model has been used to explore destination competitiveness in any contexts including Australia, Korea, Slovenia, and Serbia. Given its popularity with tourism researchers and its application to destination competitiveness studies world-wide, it is appropriate to undertake a rigorous test of the destination competitiveness attributes identified in this model, their validity and indicator accessibility to researchers and practitioners. Testing the 83 destination competitiveness attributes of this major model can inform researchers about the appropriateness of the model structure, the validity of the groupings of destination competitiveness attributes, and the relevance of different indicators to destination attributes. The data used for testing are comprehensive, covering 139 countries worldwide in the period 2007 to 2011. The testing process confirms the value of the Integrated Model in understanding a destination’s competitiveness indicators, the gains from which will be more informed policy making regarding the type of tourism development most likely to enhance resident quality of economic and social life.

Key words: Destination competitiveness; Integrated model; Competitiveness attributes

Address correspondence to Larry Dwyer, School of Marketing, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales, 3052 Quadrangle Building New South Wales 2052, Australia. Tel: +61 2 9385 2636; Fax: +61 2 9663 1985; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 19–33
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X13927625340118
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Technology-Enabled Services: Importance and Role of Technology Readiness

Ying Wang* and Beverley Sparks†

*Department of Tourism, Sport, and Hotel Management, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia
†Centre for Tourism, Sport and Services Research, Griffith Business School, Griffith University, Queensland, Australia

Set in the tourism/hospitality context, this study explores consumer perceptions of technology-enabled services (TESs) and their relationship to technology readiness (TR). Data were collected through a web-based survey from air travelers and hotel patrons. The results suggest that customers generally separate TESs into three categories: peripheral, standard, and network access related, with standard TESs being most important. The perceived importance of TESs is found to be positively associated with consumers’ technology readiness, and the strength of this association is stronger in the airline case, suggesting a moderation effect of service category on the relationship between perceived importance of TESs and TR. The findings of this study should help organizations make technology-related decisions and develop the right technological infrastructure for achieving competitiveness and customer satisfaction.

Key words: Technology-enabled services (TESs); Technology readiness (TR); Hotel; Airline

Address correspondence to Ying Wang, Department of Tourism, Sport, and Hotel Management, Gold Coast Campus, Griffith University, Queensland 4222, Australia. Tel: (617) 55528571; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 35–49
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X13927625340154
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Travel Decision Flexibility

Sangwon Park* and Daniel R. Fesenmaier†

*Hospitality and Food Management, School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK
†National Laboratory for Tourism & eCommerce, Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

This study builds on previous research examining the concept of travel decision flexibility based on theories related to adaptive decision making, which argue that travelers perceive different levels of flexibility depending on the trip-related decision. The results of this study indicate that there are two distinctive types of decision flexibility, which are related to the timing and components of the trip: pretrip and en route flexibility. The constructs are examined for their external validity using several travel situational factors, including number of alternatives, prior knowledge, length of stay, planning horizon, and types of travel groups. These findings are important in that they help us to understand better the underlying structure and characteristics of travel decisions and, in turn, help us identify potential ways to design more effective information delivery systems using information technology.

Key words: Travel decision making; Adaptive behavior; Decision flexibility

Address correspondence to Daniel R. Fesenmaier, Professor & Director, National Laboratory for Tourism & eCommerce, Department of Tourism Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, 300 Florida Gym, PO Box 118208, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 51–67
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X13927625340190
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Romancing “Friends With Benefits”: Does It Benefit New York as a Travel Destination?

Vanessa Quintal and Ian Phau

The School of Marketing, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia

This study examines whether the romantic comedy as an information source can impact on and shape viewer attitude toward and intention to visit a place. Data were collected from patrons at a large cinema chain located in a major shopping center in Australia. Using an experimental approach, the experimental group watched a romantic comedy set in New York, whereas the control group did not. Subjects in the experimental group had significantly higher empathy, past experience, place familiarity, attitude toward, intention to visit New York, and significantly lower performance/financial risk associated with visiting New York than the control group. Furthermore, perceived social risk played a significant role in influencing place familiarity in the control group. This suggests that romantic comedies can be an effective information source in allaying viewers’ concerns about a movie location. This article provides researchers with theoretical underpinning for future empirical studies in movie-induced tourism. It also encourages more collaboration between government, movie producers, and destination managers to deliver a movie that provides consistent branding in its story, location, and product placement strategies.

Key words: Movie-induced tourism; Intention to visit; Place image

Address correspondence to Ian Phau, The School of Marketing, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845. Tel: 61-8-92664014; Fax: 61-8-92663937; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 69–84
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X13927625340235
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Including Pets When Undertaking Tourism Activities: Incorporating Pet Attachment Into the TPB Model

Norman Peng,* Annie Chen,* and Kuang-Peng Hung†

*University of Westminster, London, UK
†Ming Chuan University, Taipei, Taiwan

As modern individuals place increasing value on tourism and have an increasing attachment to their pets, it is important for scholars, practitioners, and other relevant parties to determine whether pet owners will plan to have their pets accompany them when travelling for tourism purposes. Based on an analysis of 458 dog owners, this study’s results provide support for the application of the TPB model in the context of this subject. The findings of this study on the influence of pet attachment on owners’ attitudes and intentions shed new light on the existing literature and contribute to tourism literature and practices.

Key words: Pet owners; Tourism participation; Canine

Address correspondence to Norman Peng, University of Westminster, 35 Marylebone Rd, London, NW1 5LS, UK. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 85–96
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X13927625340271
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Stakeholders’ Perspective of Sustainability in an Arctic Region: A Qualitative Study

Joseph S. Chen,* Colin Johnson,† Wei Wang,* and Ya-Ling Chen*

*Department of Recreation, Park, & Tourism Studies, Indiana University at Bloomington, Bloomington, IN, USA
†Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA, USA

This research evaluates perspectives towards sustainable management among key groups of tourism stakeholders including tourism businesses, local residents, and tourists themselves. The extant literature is largely composed of quantitative studies using descriptive and regressive statistical methods along with structural modeling to highlight significant issues affecting sustainability. In contrast, this study takes a qualitative approach in an attempt to garner rich insights not always obtained from quantitative studies. The study setting is a Norwegian Arctic region, Finnmark, which is considered one of the most visited Arctic destinations in Europe. In total 68 in-depth interviews and three focus group surveys are conducted, involving tourists, tourism professionals, and local residents in several cities and towns in the Finnmark region. This study finds that participants all agree environmental and cultural issues are the key considerations in sustaining tourism development in the region. Furthermore, tourism businesses are inclined to advocate eco-friendly agendas in compliance with the concept of sustainability. Moreover, concerning stakeholders’ recommendations toward sustainable practices, this research notices that implementation of educational policies is vital for the success of sustainable practices. Relevance implications and suggestions for future study are provided in the conclusion section.

Key words: Sustainability; Stakeholder; Arctic destination

Address correspondence to Ya-Ling Chen, Department of Recreation, Park, & Tourism Studies, School of Public Health, Indiana University at Bloomington, PH 133E 1025 East 7th Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 97–104
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X13927625340316
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Effects of Channel, Timing, and Bundling on Destination Advertising Response

Jason L. Stienmetz* and Daniel R. Fesenmaier†

*Fox School of Business, National Laboratory for Tourism & eCommerce, School of Tourism & Hospitality Management, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA
†National Laboratory for Tourism & eCommerce, Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

This research investigates the relationships between advertisement channels, the timing of travel decision making, and the interaction of individual travel decisions based on the destination advertising response (DAR) model. Using a sample of 5,472 American travelers, this study finds that neither the timing of travel decision making nor the channel of advertisement significantly correlates with the advertising response for most trip decisions. However, strong interactions are found between advertising response and restaurant and shopping trip decisions, and between the attractions and events trip decisions. These findings are important in that they suggest that destination marketing programs should bundle these aspects of the trip together when developing their promotional efforts.

Key words: Destination advertising; Facets-based advertising model; Advertising response; Channels; Timing

Address correspondence to Daniel R. Fesenmaier, National Laboratory for Tourism & eCommerce, Department of Tourism, Recreation and Sport Management, University of Florida, 300 Florida Gym, PO Box 118208, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 105–110
1083-5423/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X13927625340352
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Developing a Destination Disaster Impact Framework

Lori Pennington-Gray

Department of Tourism, Recreation, and Sport Management, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA

Over the last decade the quantity and scope of global disasters has grown tremendously. Recognizing the importance of disaster management in the tourism industry, a number of crisis management frameworks have been proposed and developed to guide policies. None of these models captures the majority of variables in a tourism context relating to disasters. Thus, the purpose of this article is to propose a framework for understanding the impacts of disasters within a destination context. The proposed framework will provide a holistic overview of the actors, phases of the disaster, and the impacts to the community as a result of the disaster. The goal is to create a framework that can guide policy formulation, planning, and organization driven by impacts to the destination.

Key words: Disaster; Impact; Framework

Address correspondence to Lori Pennington-Gray, Department of Tourism, Recreation, and Sport Management, University of Florida, 325 FLG PO Box 118209, Gainesville, FL 32608, USA. Tel: 352-294-1657; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 111–116
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X13927625340398
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Website Processing Fluency: Its Impacts on Information Trust, Satisfaction, and Destination Attitude

Liang (Rebecca) Tang,* Soocheong (Shawn) Jang,† and Lanlung (Luke) Chiang‡

*Department of Apparel, Events, & Hospitality Management, College of Human Sciences, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA
†Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management, College of Health & Human Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
‡College of Management, Yuan Ze University, ChungLi, Taiwan

Processing fluency is an important concept in social cognition, which describes the ease with which externally presented messages are internally processed. This study is one of the first to investigate the processing fluency of destination websites and to identify the beneficial consequences of processing fluency, including trusting the travel information (information trust), satisfaction with that travel information (information satisfaction), and destination attitude. The results indicate that processing fluency has significant impacts on information trust and information satisfaction, and information satisfaction positively influences destination attitude. Tourism marketers are advised to consider the processing fluency of their website design to ensure that the website is effectively persuasive. The study suggests a new angle for future studies assessing the performance of marketing materials in the tourism industry.

Key words: Processing fluency; Destination websites; Information trust; Information satisfaction; Destination attitude

Address correspondence to Lanlung (Luke) Chiang, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, College of Management, Yuan Ze University, ChungLi, Taiwan. Tel: +886-3-463-8800; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 117–122
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X 13927625340433
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Tourism as a Catalyst for Economic Development in Latin America: Setting An Agenda for Policy and Research

Ryan R. Peterson,* David Cardenas,† and Rich Harrill†

*Faculty of Hospitality and Tourism Management, University of Aruba, Oranjestad, Aruba
†School of Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA

Latin America has seen impressive developments in the late 1990s and 2000s, and the forecasts for the next decade seem to be brightening after the global economic crisis. Yet despite the overall success of Latin America, research shows that wide regional disparities remain. This research note addresses the key barriers affecting the sustainable economic growth of Latin America as well as provides an agenda for policy and research. To achieve encompassing and sustainable progress, the Latin American economy will need to improve and enhance tourism capabilities in terms of institutional, infrastructural, and innovation capabilities.

Key words: Latin America; Sustainable economic growth; Infrastructure; Training

Address correspondence to Rich Harrill, Research Professor and Acting Director, School of Hotel, Restaurant, & Tourism Management, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA. Tel: (803)-777-8010; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it