Tourism Culture & Communication 14(1) Abstracts

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Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 14, pp. 1–15
1098-304X/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830414X14038917832789
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Heritage Tourism in Thai Urban Communities

Erik Cohen

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel

This article seeks to deflect the discourse on the built heritage from the conventional definitional and methodological issues to the more political question of who has the power or authority to authenticate it. Deploying Cohen and Cohen’s distinction between two modes of authentication—hot and cool—it inquires which of these modes was dominant in the authentication of the built heritage of three small towns in Thailand, and how each influenced the extent of preservation of that heritage. The article concludes that the “cool” mode of authentication of the built heritage provided a more secure and more permanent basis for the preservation of the built heritage than the “hot” mode of authentication, which, because it makes preservation contingent on the continuous reiteration of perfomative authenticating acts by visitors, proved too fickle to pose serious obstacles to the modification or destruction of the built heritage. But in the cases under consideration, eventually neither mode of authentication proved powerful enough to prevent outside developers from interfering with the built heritage and changing the ambience of the old towns.

Key words: Heritage tourism; Thailand; Authentication; Built heritage

Address correspondence to Erik Cohen, Ph.D., George S. Wise Professor Emeritus of Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 14, pp. 17–26
1098-304X/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830414X14038917832824
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Visitors to Cultural Heritage Attractions: An Activity-Based Integrated Typology

Gyan P. Nyaupane and Kathleen L. Andereck

School of Community Resources & Development, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA

The purpose of this article is to broaden understanding of cultural heritage tourists through an activity based a priori segmentation approach. Data were collected from a survey conducted with 1,938 tourists visiting cultural heritage sites and events in Arizona (USA). This study suggests that tourists visiting cultural heritage attractions can be divided into two groups: “true cultural heritage tourists” and “spurious cultural heritage tourists.” Furthermore, true cultural tourists can be subgrouped into two types: “tangible heritage” and “intangible heritage” tourists. Similarly, spurious cultural heritage tourists are divided into three subgroups: “nature,” “sport,” and “business” tourists. These groups are compared in terms of demographics, importance of attractions, and motivations, and it is found that these typologies are distinct. The implications for cultural tourism attraction managers and marketer sare discussed.

Key words: Cultural heritage; Intangible heritage; Tangible heritage; Tourist typology; Segmentation

Address correspondence to Gyan P. Nyaupane, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director, School of Community Resources & Development, Arizona State University, 411 N. Central Ave, Suite 550, Phoenix, AZ 85004-0953, USA. Tel: (602) 496-0166; Fax: (602) 496-0953; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 14, pp. 27–39
1098-304X/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830414X14038917832860
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Tourism, Visual Culture, and the State in Northern Thailand

Mary Mostafanezhad

Department of Tourism, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

The progressive assimilation of Highlanders into lowland Thai society is matched by the simultaneous promotion of these groups to foreign and domestic tourists for their distinctive cultures and ways of life. Highlanders is a collective term representing more than 10 ethnic minority groups living in the mountainous regions of northern Thailand. This article addresses these contradictory discourses of assimilation and distinctiveness and argues that picture postcards of Highlanders serve as assemblage components of a broader political project as well as highlights how tourism discourses can intersect with local and state politics. Arguments in this article are based on a content analysis of 77 picture postcards of northern Thai highlanders. Beyond illustrating how these images echo institutionalized forms of representation of ethnic minority groups as feminized, living in harmony with nature, and timeless, this article attends to how these tourism imaginaries are implicated in the material realities of Highlanders living in northern Thailand.

Key words: Highlanders (“Hill Tribes”); Northern Thailand; Visual culture; Postcards

Address correspondence to Mary Mostafanezhad, Department of Geography, College of Social Sciences, University of Hawai`i at Mānoa, 445 Saunders Hall, 2424 Maile Way, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism, Culture & Communication, Vol. 14, pp. 41–52
1098-304X/14 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/109830414X14038917832905
E-ISSN 1943-4146
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Representations of a Destination Brand in Online Tourism Information Sources: The Case of Slovenia

Velvet Nelson

Department of Geography and Geology, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX, USA

In the highly competitive global tourism industry, place branding has become a widely used tool in the promotion of tourism destinations. The creation and communication of a unique, positive, and recognizable identity is considered key for destinations to remain competitive and vital for relatively unknown destinations to raise awareness among international audiences. However, the brand-building process has become more challenging than ever, as destinations around the world seek to promote themselves in much the same way. Consequently, destinations have begun to move away from traditional marketing strategies towards experiential marketing that seeks to engage potential tourists by not only communicating the characteristics of the place but also appealing to their senses and emotions. The Internet has become the key medium for the communication of destination brands, typically through national tourism websites. However, in the modern information search process, tourists have a multitude of resources available to them that do not always correspond with the internally created brand identity. This article considers the case of Slovenia. Tourism stakeholders have engaged in the process of building and communicating a rich and coherent experiential brand. Yet, Slovenia as a tourism destination is subject to the representations of external sources that have not adopted or successfully incorporated the essence of Brand Slovenia. In this article, tourism information websites are examined through the use of content analysis to investigate the differences in representations of the destination between the internally and externally produced sources.

Key words: Slovenia; Tourism websites; Content analysis; Tourism destination brands; Experiential branding

Address correspondence to Velvet Nelson, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Geology, Sam Houston State University, Box 2148, Huntsville, TX 77341-2148, USA. Tel: (001) 936-294-4065; Fax: (001) 936-294-4203; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it