Event Management 18(4) Abstracts

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Event Management, Vol. 18, pp. 407–420
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599514X
14143427352076
E-ISSN 1943-4308

Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Evaluating the Economic Contribution of a Large Indoor Entertainment Venue: An Inscope Expenditure Study

Deborah Edwards,* Carmel Foley,* Larry Dwyer,†‡ Katie Schlenker,* and Anja Hergesell*

*UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, Sydney, Australia
†School of Marketing, Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
‡School of Management, University of Canberra, Bruce, Australia

Music events are elements of entertainment that are important to people’s social lives. Large indoor entertainment venues meet this need through the provision of entertainment such as live music performances. While large indoor entertainment venues impact the economies of the communities in which they are located, there is minimal research that investigates their economic contribution. To address this gap, this article examines the inscope expenditure arising from a range of events held at the Sydney Entertainment Centre (SEC) for the areas surrounding it—Chinatown/Haymarket precinct, the Darling Harbour precinct, and the City of Sydney local government area. It was found that the SEC benefits the immediate venue location, as well as adjacent business precincts, with backward and forward economic linkages evident in visitor expenditure patterns. Surprisingly, free concerts were also found to generate high expenditures in surrounding areas. Implications for stakeholders are discussed.

Key words: Visitor expenditure; Large-scale entertainment venues; Economic impact; Tourism precincts

Address correspondence to Deborah Edwards, Management Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123 Broadway, Sydney, NSW 2007, Australia. Tel: +61 2 95145424; Fax: +61 2 95145198; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 18, pp. 421–429
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599514X
14143427352111
E-ISSN 1943-4308

Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Events as Proenvironmental Learning Spaces

Judith Mair

School of Business, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia

Climate change is an ongoing issue for governments internationally, driving them to seek more ways in which to encourage the general public to engage with the sustainability agenda. Despite substantial research into consumer behavior, behavior change, and social marketing, there are still opportunities to find innovative messaging tools that may help to persuade people to change their habits. This article reports on initial exploratory research into the use of events as a space for proenvironmental behavior messaging, and concludes that although significant research is needed, some events have potential to become environmental learning spaces for attendees.

Key words: Events; Sustainability; Social marketing; Proenvironmental behavior

Address correspondence to Dr. Judith Mair, Senior Lecturer in Event Management/Tourism, School of Business, The University of Queensland, QLD 4072, Australia. Tel: 07 3346 7947; Fax: 07 3364 9408; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 18, pp. 431–446
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599514X
1414143427352157
E-ISSN 1943-4308

Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games: Including Volunteers With Disabilities—A Podium Performance?

Simon Darcy,* Tracey J. Dickson,† and Angela M. Benson‡

*UTS Business School and Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney, Lindfield, NSW, Australia
†Centre for Tourism Research, Faculty of Business, Government and Law, University of Canberra, Bruce, ACT, Australia
‡School of Sport and Service Management, Eastbourne Campus, University of Brighton, Eastbourne, UK

This article presents an examination of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games’ volunteers who identified as having access needs and/or disabilities. The methodology draws upon data collected as part of a larger quantitative mixed method research design through an online survey that included open-ended questions. The quantitative element of the online survey was framed by the Special Event Volunteer Motivation Scale together with sociodemographic questions supplemented by disability and access specific questions. The qualitative analysis of the open-ended responses of the experiences of people with disability was framed using the UK government’s Office of Disability Issues (ODI) policy conceptualization of the barriers affecting the access and inclusion of people with disability. A small number of volunteers related feedback consistent with the principles of the ODI best practice through good staff support and overall positive experiences. However, other experiences indicate significant organizational, environmental, and structural issues faced by volunteers with disability in the program. The implications of these findings for future event planning processes and broader macropolicy considerations are discussed.

Key words: Mega-events; Volunteer management; Disability; Inclusion; Sports; Legacy; Organization behavior

Address correspondence to Simon Darcy, Professor, UTS Business School and Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Centre, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 222, Lindfield, NSW 2070, Australia. Tel: +61 2 9514 5100; Fax: +61 2 9514 5195; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 18, pp. 447–455
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599514X
14143427352193
E-ISSN 1943-4308

Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Surfing the Fringe: An Examination of Event Tourism Strategies of the Bleach Festival—Coolangatta Queensland

Jo Mackellar

Center for Tourism, Sport and Service Research, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia

Created as a celebration of art, music, and surf culture, the Bleach Festival was designed as a fringe-style event to be positioned in the week between two major surf events (Quiksilver/Roxy Pro and Burleigh Pro) held annually in Coolangatta, Queensland, Australia. Using visitor data collected at the event, in conjunction with an in-depth interview of the event’s manager, the study evaluates the success of the festival against its own objectives of tourism extension, destination brand development, and local artist engagement. Additionally, the study explores the utility of augmentation strategies in achieving these objectives. Resultant issues in measuring the value of arts and cultural development in conjunction with tourism are further discussed.

Key words: Fringe festival; Destination management; Branding; Local artist engagement; Subculture

Address correspondence to Jo Mackellar, Ph.D., Centre for Tourism, Sport and Service Research, Griffith University, Gold Coast,QLD, Australia. Tel: +61 7 5552 7675; Fax: +61 7 5552 8469; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 18, pp. 457–470
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599514X
14143427352238
E-ISSN 1943-4308

Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Managing Alcohol and Drugs in Event and Venue Settings: The Australian Case

Rob Harris,* Deborah Edwards,* and Peter Homel

*Australian Centre for Event Management, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
†Crime Reduction and Review Program, Australian Institute of Criminology, Sydney, Australia

One of the major challenges of operating events and venues is that of managing attendee/patron alcohol and drug use. In the Australian context, a rising number of alcohol and drug-related incidents in and around these settings have resulted in a renewed focus on how these negative outcomes can be more effectively controlled. In order to aid those charged with the task of addressing this matter—event and venue managers, police, security firms, alcohol and drug regulatory bodies, and governments at all levels—this article seeks to identify those variables with the potential to impact this management issue. Further, it aims to provide the previously identified stakeholders with a deeper appreciation of the raft of practices that are currently in use, and potentially available to them, as they build responses to this challenge at the individual state, precinct, venue, or event level. The research approach used involved an extensive literature review and a series of in-depth interviews with key stakeholders across three states—New South Wales, Victoria, and Western Australia.

Key words: Drugs and alcohol; Events and venues; Regulation; Enforcement; Control practices

Address correspondence to Dr. Rob Harris, Australian Centre for Event Management, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 222, Lindfield, 2070 Sydney, Australia. Tel: +61 409409637; Fax: +61 9514 5195; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 18, pp. 473–477
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599514X
14143427352319
E-ISSN 1943-4308

Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Too Much Nostalgia? A Decennial Reflection on the Heritage Classic Ice Hockey Event

Gregory Ramshaw

Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism Management, Clemson University, Clemson, SC, USA

This research note explores the legacy of the Heritage Classic, an outdoor ice hockey event held in Edmonton, Canada in November 2003. The event explicitly and successfully evoked nostalgia for former players, past teams, rural environments, and the egalitarian nature of childhood games, becoming a major international media and tourism event as well as the template for numerous outdoor ice hockey events held around the world. It also provided the Edmonton Oilers hockey club and the event’s organizers with both emotional and economic capital at a time when the franchise required support. However, the success of the Heritage Classic meant that the National Hockey League (NHL) and other hockey leagues would organize subsequent outdoor hockey events, thereby minimizing the ability for individual franchises to benefit from their heritage as the Oilers did. Furthermore, little was done locally to build on the success of the Heritage Classic, while the proliferation of similar events globally may have minimized both the media and tourism impacts of subsequent outdoor hockey games.

Key words: Heritage; Nostalgia; Sporting event; Hockey; National Hockey League (NHL); Edmonton Oilers

Address correspondence to Gregory Ramshaw, Ph.D., Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism Management, Clemson University, 128 McGinty Court, 263 Lehotsky Hall, Clemson, SC 29634-0735, USA. Tel: 864-656-4205; Fax: 864-656-2226; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 18, pp. 479–485
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599514X
14143427352355
E-ISSN 1943-4308

Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Going “Beyond the Manual”: The Practicum Host Experience With Event Management Students

Joany Grima

Wellington Institute of Technology, Wellington, New Zealand

As tertiary event management qualifications in New Zealand thrive, so too does the relationship between the local events industry and institutions delivering such programs. The Graduate Diploma in Event Management (GDEM) is a recent addition to the portfolio of programs offered at Wellington Institute of Technology (WelTec). The GDEM includes a significant practicum component. This article reports on an exploratory research project of practicum host organizations and their experiences of hosting a GDEM student. Using the results of an online questionnaire, the article identifies the impact of the student placement on the host and the skills, knowledge, and personal qualities required by students to be successful in completing their practicum. It also identifies the willingness of hosts to continue with or recommend practicum placements and determines how the practicum may influence future recruitment at host organizations. Findings indicate the majority of practicum hosts found the experience to be positive, with students matched appropriately to the event environment. Recommendations are made for further research into the effectiveness of event management training, including greater collaboration between tertiary institutions.

Key words: Practicum; Event management training; Industry host

Address correspondence to Joany Grima, Event Management Lecturer, Wellington Institute of Technology, Private Bag 39803, Wellington Mail Centre, Lower Hutt 5045, Wellington, New Zealand. Tel: +64 4 830 3028; Fax: +64 4 920 2628; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Event Management, Vol. 18, pp. 487–491
1525-9951/14 $60.00
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/152599514X
14143427352391
E-ISSN 1943-4308

Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Research Note

Brazilian World Cup 2014: Terrorism, Tourism, and Social Conflict

Maximiliano E. Korstanje,* Rodanthi Tzanelli,† and Anthony Clayton‡

*University of Palermo, Buenos Aires, Argentina
†University of Leeds, Leeds, UK
‡University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica

The World cup transcends the interests of culture and nations worldwide. Every 4 years, delegations from the four corners of the world compete for a month. The mass tourist demand an event of this caliber generates prompts policy makers and tourism scholars to devote considerable time in planning in detail the infrastructure and service industry for the benefit of incomers. Unfortunately, in areas of the world plagued by political instability, some groups may use the media events to communicate radical messages to the state. For similar reasons many specialists have studied terrorist attack prevention in the context of event management. This present article is based on the FIFA World Cup in Brazil 2014 to illustrate that terrorism and tourism have been historically intertwined.

Key words: Brazil 2014; Event management; Terrorism; Tourism; World Cup

Address correspondence to Maximiliano E. Korstanje, University of Palermo, Dorrego 169 2 Floor F., Buenos Aires, Argentina 1414. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it