Tourism Analysis 19(6) Abstracts

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Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 659–672
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14116690097693
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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“Foodies” and Their Travel Preferences

Donald Getz and Richard N. S. Robinson

UQ Business School, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

This articles examines the propensity of Australian food lovers, or “foodies,” to travel both domestically and internationally for food-related experiences. Data are analyzed from a survey of food lovers in Australia, profiling their characteristics, pertinent travel behavior, desired experiences, trip and destination preferences, with special attention given to isolating characteristics and preferences of those who had already traveled for food-related experiences. In the conclusions we make recommendations for destinations seeking to develop food tourism, in effect providing a demand-based planning and marketing approach. A principal conclusion is that they are highly involved with food, think of themselves as gourmets, and they desire a multifaceted holiday. Core experiences include consumption of authentic cuisine, learning about food/beverages and gastronomic traditions, and socializing. These must be augmented through opportunities for broader cultural, natural, touring, and shopping experiences. Recommendations are made for extending this line of research and theory development.

Key words: Foodies; Food tourism; Demand; Destination development; Targeted marketing

Address correspondence to Donald Getz, School of Tourism, The University of Queensland, St Lucia Campus, Brisbane, 4067, Queensland, Australia. Tel: +61 7 3346 8717; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 673–688
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679286
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Proenvironmental Behavior: The Link Between Place Attachment and Place Satisfaction

Haywantee Ramkissoon*†§ and Felix Mavondo

*Behaviourworks Australia, Monash Sustainability Institute, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
†Australia & International Tourism Research Unit, Faculty of Arts, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
‡Department of Marketing, Faculty of Business & Economics, Monash University, Clayton, Australia
§School of Marketing, Curtin Business School, Curtin University, Bentley, Australia

The study tested whether proenvironmental behavioral intention mediates the relationship between place attachment and place satisfaction among visitors of the Dandenong Ranges National Park in Australia. Structural equation modeling was employed on a sample of 452 visitors. Regression models were estimated to test the mediating effect of proenvironmental behavioral intentions on the relationships between place dependence, place identity, place affect, place social bonding, and place satisfaction. Results show that as hypothesized, these effects were mediated by proenvironmental behavioral intentions, except for the relationship between place social bonding and place satisfaction. An important theoretical contribution is the mediating role of proenvironmentalbehavioral intentions in nature-based settings. Practical applications of the study include marketing aimed at encouraging repeat visitation by increasing levels of place attachment and place satisfaction in national parks through proenvironmental message development and delivery.

Key words: Proenvironmental behavior; Place attachment; Place satisfaction; National parks

Address correspondence to Haywantee Ramkissoon, Ph.D., Behaviourworks Australia, Monash Sustainability Institute, Australia & International Tourism Research Unit, Faculty of Arts, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, VIC3800, Australia. Tel: +61 449534097; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 689–699
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679321
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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The Spillover Effects of Wine and Harvest Festival on Other Festivals

Seohee Chang

Hospitality and Tourism Management, Woosong University, Daejeon, Korea

Few studies have investigated spillover effects for alliances among a series of seasonal festivals in a local community. To understand the spillover effects of Wine and Harvest Festival as the core festival on other festivals, this study examined the likelihood of intending to attend Winter Festival, Strawberry Festival, and Oktoberfest Festival by using preferences, loyalty, and past attendance associated with Wine and Harvest Festival. The Wine and Harvest Festival attendees were surveyed online. The final sample size was 370 attendees at the Wine and Harvest Festival. The data were analyzed using descriptive analysis, exploratory factor analysis, and a binary logistic regression. The results demonstrated that past visits to the Wine and Harvest Festival as the core festival was the significant predictor of individuals’ intention to attend the Winter Festival and the Strawberry Festival in the future. Further discussions are presented in this article.

Key words: Festival alliances; Schematic categorization; Spillover effects; Context effects

Address correspondence to Seohee Chang, Hospitality and Tourism Management, Woosong University, 907 Woosong Tower (W13), 17-2 Jayang-Dong (226-2), Dong-GuDaejeon 300-718, Republic of Korea. Tel: 82-042-630-9236; Fax: 042-630-9767; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 701–718
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679402
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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The Role of the Public Sector in Tourism Destination Management From a Network Relationship Approach

Mathilda Van Niekerk

Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL, USA

The study aims to determine the suitability of the dyadic approach and the network relationship approach when engaging destination stakeholders and to identify the roles of the public sector within destination management. These study aims are investigated in the context of Mbombela Local Municipality, South Africa. A conceptual framework was developed based on a literature review. Data were then collected through official documents, 55 semistructured interviews with key stakeholders, a local economic summit, forum discussions, and 504 demand- and 403 supply-side questionnaires. The study findings suggest that the network relationship approach was the most suitable approach for the engagement of destination stakeholders. In addition to the roles identified in previous studies, the study findings identified several additional roles that the public sector should fulfill in destination management. Based on the study findings, a new conceptual framework for the role of the public sector in destination management has been proposed. By utilizing the conceptual framework developed in this study, destinations can engage their stakeholders more effectively and increase the attractiveness of their destinations. This is one of a few studies from Africa providing empirical findings on destination management and the role of the public sector within destination management.

Key words: Destination management; Roles of public sector; Network relationship approach; Stakeholder theory

Address correspondence to Dr. Mathilda van Niekerk, Assistant Professor, Rosen College of Hospitality Management, University of Central Florida, 9907 Universal Blvd., Orlando, FL 32819, USA. Tel: (+1) 407 903 8052; Fax: (+1) 407 903 8105; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 719–730
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679448
E-ISSN 1943-3999
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2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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What Is Good for Tourists Should Be Good for Residents Too: The Relationship Between the Quality of the Touristic Offer and Subjective Well-Being Of Residents

Ljiljana Kaliterna LipovčanAndreja Brajša-Žganec, and Saša Poljanec-Borić

Ivo Pilar Institute of Social Sciences, Zagreb, Croatia

The aim of this article is to examine the relationship between the quality of tourist destinations and the subjective well-being of people living in the destination. Two data sets were used for the analysis: one related to the subjective well-being of Croatian citizens and the other related to the quality of tourist destinations in the country. Subjective well-being measures included: overall happiness, life satisfaction and satisfaction with the standard of living, health, achievements in life, relationships, safety, community connectedness, and future security, using a scale from 0 to 10. The final data set included 2,171 residents (aged 15–64) from 41 destinations with varying touristic quality. The destinations were grouped into three categories according to the touristic quality. Results of the ANCOVAs for quality of tourist destination as independent variable, subjective well-being of residents is dependent variables, and sociodemographics as covariates (age, gender, education, monthly income, level of urbanization) showed that the quality of tourist destination was related to residents’ life satisfaction and happiness, as well as the satisfaction with personal life domains. The residents of destinations with the higher evaluated quality of tourist offer were more happy, more satisfied with their lives in general, with their material status, personal health, achievements in life, relationships with family and friends, feelings of physical safety, acceptance by the community, and future security than the residents from the destinations with medium and lower quality of tourist offer.

Key words: Life satisfaction; Happiness; Domain satisfaction; Tourism quality; Residents

Address correspondence to Ljiljana Kaliterna LipovčanIvo Pilar Institute of Social Sciences, Marulicev trg 19, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia. Tel: +385-1-4886820; Fax: +385-1-4828296; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 731–740
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679484
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Tourism Entrepreneurs’ Perception of Quality of Life: An Explorative Study

Mike Peters* and Markus Schuckert

*Department of Tourism Business Studies, MCI Management Center Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria
†School of Hotel & Tourism Management, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong

This article analyzes entrepreneurs’ perception of their quality of life (QOL) as well as their entrepreneurial activities. For smaller businesses in particular, business growth is not only a management decision; small business entrepreneurs’ QOL considerations play an important role when planning the future of their firm. This holds true for many businesses in the tourism industry, where we find a large number of small and family-owned businesses. Based on a literature review, the authors develop a qualitative study that aims at investigating the role of QOL perception for tourism businesses’ growth. Within this industry, the authors identify lifestyle entrepreneurial behaviors, and highlight how QOL perceptions are interrelated with individuals’ perception of entrepreneurship in tourism. It can be stated that the motives and the level of these entrepreneurs’ growth orientation seem to be highly congruent to the definition of lifestyle entrepreneurs. They clearly perceive the need for a balance between enterprise growth and a good work–life relationship (QOL), and they tend to put a stronger emphasis on QOL. The majority of entrepreneurs are much more driven to pursue the perfect balance between entrepreneurship and QOL.

Key words: Quality of life (QOL); Lifestyle entrepreneur; Growth orientation; Work–life balance; Small tourism businesses

Address correspondence to Mike Peters, Department of Tourism Business Studies, MCI Management Center Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 741–757
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679529
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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The Impact of Tourism on Quality of Life: A Segmentation Analysis of the Youth Market

Celeste Eusébio and Maria João Carneiro

Department of Economics, Management and Industrial Engineering, University of AveiroAveiro, Portugal

Despite the importance of the youth tourism market to the tourism industry, research on the impact of tourism on quality of life (QOL) of this market and on the factors that influence this impact is still very limited. This article contributes to overcoming the research gap in this field, implementing a segmentation approach based on the impact of tourism on features related to several domains of youth tourists’ QOL (physical health, psychological features, social relationships, and environment). This approach was empirically tested with a sample of university students. The impact of tourism on youth tourists’ QOL was assessed using an adapted version of the WHOQOL-BREF scale. The results reveal that tourism has an impact on the QOL of youth tourists and that this market is heterogeneous regarding the perceptions of this impact. Moreover, travel motivations, host–tourist interactions, the travel group, and the type of destination visited seem to be the factors that have a higher influence on the perceptions of the impact of tourism on QOL. The article ends with some theoretical and practical contributions to the marketing and development of tourism destinations.

Key words: Quality of life (QOL); Segmentation; WHOQOL-BREF; Youth market; Tourism

Address correspondence to Celeste Eusébio, Ph.D., Department of Economics, Management and Industrial Engineering, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal. Tel: 00351-234-370361; Fax: 00351-234-370215; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 759–767
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679565
E-ISSN 1943-3999
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Work During Vacation: Not So Bad After All

Jeroen Nawijn and Yvette Damen

NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences, Breda, the Netherlands

Work during vacation is publicly and theoretically seen as detrimental to vacationers’ quality of life. This study investigated whether work during vacation affects vacationers’ quality of life in terms of intensity of felt emotions and needs fulfillment. A sample of international tourists in the Netherlands (N = 374) took part in a street survey. Findings indicate that workers’ and nonworkers’ emotional experience is not statistically different during vacation. The fulfillment of needs is also identical between workers andnonworkers. Ninety-seven percent of workers are satisfied with the balance between work and leisure time during vacation. These findings suggest that working tourists effectively combine work and leisure. Some dissatisfaction did arise from the lack of certain work facilities. Implications for the tourism industry and suggestions for further research are provided.

Key words: Work; Emotions; Quality of life; Need theory; Liquid leisure; Self-actualization

Address correspondence to Dr. Jeroen Nawijn, Senior lecturer in Tourism, NHTV Breda University of Applied Sciences, P.O. Box 3917, 4800 DX Breda, the Netherlands. Tel: +31 7 6533 2749; Fax: +31 7 6533 2205; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 769–774
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679600
E-ISSN 1943-3999
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Research Note

Effects of Knowledge, Testimonials, and Ad Copy on Cruise Advertising Judgments

Brett A. S. Martin* and Aaron Vincent†

*Consumer Research Group, School of Advertising, Marketing and Public Relations, QUT Business School, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia
†V/Line, Melbourne, Australia

Tourist individual differences, such as levels of knowledge, are increasingly recognized as influencing how people respond to information. However, little research has examined the role of consumer knowledge on responses to different components of cruise advertising information. Using input from an industry panel combined with insight and measures from the literature, the results of this field experiment show that consumer knowledge interacts with two aspects of advertising—testimonial expertise and advertising copy—to influence purchase intentions towards a cruise. The results offer important implications for researchers and tourism managers regarding how consumer knowledge influences which types of advertising information are most persuasive to consumers. Results also indicate that expert consumers have more favorable attitudes than novice consumers towards cruise advertising.

Key words: Tourist knowledge; Cruising; Advertising effectiveness; Testimonials; Attributes; Benefits

Address correspondence to Brett A. S. Martin, Consumer Research Group, School of Advertising, Marketing and Public Relations, QUT Business School, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, Brisbane, QLD 4000, Australia. Tel: +61 7 3138 7739; Fax: + 61 7 3138 1811; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 775–780
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679646
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Research Note

Dispelling Gendered Myths in Tourism Promotional Materials: An Upstream Social Marketing Perspective

Deepak Chhabra and Erin Johnston

School of Community Resources & Development, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, USA

This study performs an important task of revisiting gender representations over time in tourism advertisements by destination marketing organizations in the US (after 5 years), using a geographic strata approach. Subtle evidence with regard to manipulation of visual imagery is noted in ritualized images of women, although equitable profiling is also reported in several gender display categories. This study suggests an “upstream” social marketing agenda to minimize stereotype representations.

Key words: Gender equity; Upstream social marketing; Gender representations; Visual imageries

Address correspondence to Deepak Chhabra, Ph.D., Associate Professor, School of Community Resources & Development, Arizona State University, 411 N. Central Ave., Ste. 550, Phoenix, AZ 85004-0690, USA. Tel: 602-496-0172; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 781–790
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679682
E-ISSN 1943-3999
Copyright ©
2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
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Research Note

Is Tourism in Lebanon Subject to Permanent or Transitory Exogenous Shocks?

Charbel Bassil,* Ali Salman Saleh,† and Sajid Anwar‡§

*Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Notre Dame University–LouaizeZouk Mosbeh, Lebanon
†College of Business and Economics, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar
‡School of Business, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore QLD, Australia
§Shanghai Lixin University of Commerce, Shanghai, China

The tourism industry makes a significant contribution to Lebanese gross domestic product (GDP). Lebanon has been rocked by political instability and regional conflicts over the past several decades. These exogenous shocks can adversely affect visitor arrivals. Using monthly data from 2008 to 2013, this article attempts to identify some statistically significant shocks to visitor arrivals to Lebanon and their nature (i.e., whether or not the impact of the shocks was temporary). The empirical analysis based onunivariate as well as panel unit root testing procedures, where structural breaks are endogenously determined, suggests that at least one exogenous shock has significantly affected tourist arrivals to Lebanon. However, in overall terms, the impact of these shocks on visitor arrivals has been temporary.

Key words: Structural breaks; Unit root tests; Tourism; Lebanon; Visitor arrivals

Address correspondence to Charbel Bassil, Notre Dame University–Louaize, P.O. Box 72, Zouk Mikael, Lebanon. Tel: 00-961-9-208319; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 791–797
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146846679727
E-ISSN 1943-3999
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Research Note

Problem Gambling and Preventive Measures: The Case of Australia

Timothy J. Lee* and Hwa-Kyung Kim†

*Department of Tourism & Hospitality, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University (APU), Beppu, Japan
†Department of Hotel Management, Jeju International University, Jeju City, South Korea

Problem gambling causes serious problems to personal well-being, families, communities, and even a country’s economy. This article highlights the impacts of problem gambling and evaluates the current preventive measures taken by the federal and state governments and other organizations in Australia. This article also presents recommendations to bolster the current preventive measures to reduce the widespread impacts of problem gambling. Exclusion programs, education about responsible gambling, involvement of the federal government, website filtering, direct mailing of responsible gambling brochures, and automatic reminders in electronic gaming machines are recommendations devised to augment the current preventive measures in Australia in relation to problem gambling.

Key words: Problem gambling; Harm prevention; Australia

Address correspondence to Timothy J. Lee, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Tourism & Hospitality, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University (APU), Beppu, 874-8577 Japan. Tel: +81 977 78 1224; Fax: +81 977 78 1121; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Analysis, Vol. 19, pp. 799–805
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/108354214X
14146848084400
E-ISSN 1943-3999
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Research Note

Revising the “Five-Fold Framework” in Human Resource Management Practices: Insights From a Small-Scale Travel Agent

Azizul Hassan

Department of Marketing, Events and Tourism, Business School, University of Greenwich, London, UK

This article focuses on recruitment and selection, an important area of human resource management, with reference to a small-scale family-owned travel agent. Travelmania Limited, a London-based agent, is the case under consideration. Also, this study outlines the theoretical facts of the “Five-Fold Framework,” justifying its relevancy in this identified context. This framework, as outlined by John Munro Fraser in 1954, is represented through five points: impact on others, qualifications and experience, innate abilities, motivation, and emotional adjustments. Results show that, where a typical form of family relation is attached to ownership and management, external employees are less likely to be offered any preference. In such circumstances, family influences become more dominant than relevant qualifications, experience, and working capacities. In certain situations, employees outside of the family relationship network can become vulnerable to poor motivation and emotional suppression. This study underlines the broader mindset of the employer and practicing rational human resource management strategies.

Key words: Recruitment and selection; Five-Fold Framework; Human resource management; Travelmania Limited

Address correspondence to Azizul Hassan, Research Assistant, Department of Marketing, Events and Tourism, Business School, University of Greenwich, London, SE10 9LS, UK. Tel: +0044 07853024625; Fax: +0044 02083319005; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it