Tourism Review International 18(3) Abstracts

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Tourism Review International, Vol. 18, pp. 115-135
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X14101901317039
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Second Home Tourism: An International Review

C. Michael Hall

Department of Management, Marketing and Entrepreneurship, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
Centre for Tourism, University of Eastern Finland, Savonlinna, Finland
Department of Geography, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden
School of Tourism & Hospitality, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

Second home tourism has emerged as a significant area of research on tourism-related mobility and multiple dwelling. The article conducts a review of the academic literature and is divided into two main parts. The first part charts the growth of second home publications in relation to countries of authors, leading journals, and number of publications. The second part discusses major themes in second home research including motivations, location, planning, housing, social and community dimensions, environmental dimensions, and governance. Future research themes are also identified. The article concludes by noting that while the implications of mobility and multiple dwelling for urbanization processes and change to amenity environments, there was a need for greater attention to life course and relational approaches to better understand the temporal and spatial dimensions of second homes.

Key words: Periurban; Vacation home; Holiday home; Summer home; Cottage

Address correspondence to Professor C. Michael Hall, Department of Management, Marketing and Entrepreneurship, University of Canterbury, Rm221 Business & Law Building, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand 8140. Tel: +64 3 364 2606; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 18, pp. 137-152
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X14101901317075
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Ongoing and Future Relationships of Second Home Owners With Places in Coastal Australia: An Empirical Case Study From Eastern Victoria

Nick Osbaldiston* and Felicity Picken

*School of Applied Media and Social Sciences, Federation University Australia, Churchill, Vic, Australia
School of Social Sciences, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia

Many of Australia’s second homes are located in peripheral locations along the coast, away from suburbia and cities. Many of these areas have specific challenges relating to a declining or consolidating agricultural sector and the need to diversify economies in a climate of uncertainty. This offers specific challenges for coastal local governments, who are often resource poor, managing transitional economies with unclear futures in terms of current and projected populations. This article begins with this broad landscape and focuses on two southeastern Victorian coastal areas that are known second home hotspots. Our article presents the findings of a residential survey conducted in Inverloch and Philip Island that specifically captured second home owners to discover who they are, why they have a second home in that area, what local area concerns they have, and what they intend to do with their second homes in the future. Within the limitations of our data, we find ambivalence among second home owners as a group, supporting the scholarship that identifies the difficulties of pinning this phenomenon down. That said, there are some discernible patterns among second home owners, particularly when they are put in contrast with the permanent residents of these communities.

Key words: Second homes; Coastal tourism; Australia; Lifestyle migration; Sociology of coastal lifestyles

Address correspondence to Dr. Nick Osbaldiston, School of Applied Media and Social Sciences, Federation University Australia, Gippsland Campus, PO Box 3191 Gippsland Mail Centre, Churchill, Vic 3841, Australia. Tel: +61351226846/+61415212211; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 18, pp. 153-166
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X14101901317110
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Economically Detached? Second Home Owners and the Local Community in Poland

Adam Czarnecki

Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland

Given that agriculture has been to a significant extent losing its role as the key economic stimulus for rural communities, an explicit need to search for new income, employment and development opportunities arises. Because second homes have become popular and a common element of the European rural space, they may contribute considerably to rural restructuring through the rise in households’ incomes and increasing labor opportunities not only in tourism-based communities but also in formerly agricultural depopulating areas. In this article, the main research objective is to identify and evaluate economic relationships between second home owners and the local people in Poland. These were examined in terms of scale (number of actors involved) and the object of transactions (agriculture produce, other articles of everyday use, building materials, services) as well as in economic value. Therefore, the key aim of the study is to answer the question whether the flow of capital resources to rural areas from outside is significant or marginal—that is, whether it should be considered as a development precondition with a significant influence on rural economy or rather as a factor of little importance, restricted to certain types of areas or groups of stakeholders or providing only an additional income.

Key words: Second homes; Economic relationships; Local economy; Rural areas; Multifunctional development; Poland

Address correspondence to Adam Czarnecki, Karelian Institute, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 111, FI-80101 Joensuu, Finland. Tel: +358 505966661; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 18, pp. 167-178
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X14101901317156
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

VFR Travel and Second Home Tourism: The Missing Link? The Case of South Africa

Christian M. Rogerson* and Gijsbert Hoogendoorn

*School of Tourism and Hospitality, Faculty of Management, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
†School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa

Visiting friends and relatives (VFR) travel and second home tourism as topics of investigation have seen an upsurge in international research over the past 20 years. However, rarely has the conceptual link between the two issues been explored at any great length. The purpose of this article is to explore the nexus between VFR travel and second home tourism with particular reference to the Global South. The case of South Africa provides the empirical context. It is revealed that VFR travel and second homes in South Africa must be understood in terms of two circuits. The first circuit, mainly of affluent whites, mirrors the experiences of the Global North with VFR travel linked to recreational second homes. The second circuit shows the experiences of the Global South where working class residents migrate between first and second homes through circular migration as a consequence of labor migration.

Key words: Visiting friends and relatives (VFR) travel; Second homes; Tourism

Address correspondence to Gijsbert Hoogendoorn, School of Geography, Archaeology and Environmental Studies, University of the Witwatersrand, Private Bag x3, Wits, Johannesburg 2050, South Africa. Tel: +27117176521; Fax: +2711866516366; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 18, pp. 179-192
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X14101901317192
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Globalization and the Impacts of Leisure-Induced Mobilities: Lessons From Tafí Del Valle (NW Argentine Andes)

Gerhard Rainer* and Samuel Bedrich Morales Gaitán

*Institute of Geography, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52f, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
†Social Sciences (FLACSO-AR), San Sebastián Tutla, Oaxaca, México

When analyzing the globalization of rural spaces, second home tourism, lifestyle migration, and tourism in general commonly merge. However, there is evidence that their social, economic, and environmental impacts are markedly distinct. Based on a case study conducted in Tafí del Valle, a village in the North West Argentine Andes, this study asserts the need for interdisciplinary approaches to the study of contemporary modes of tourism, second home tourism, and lifestyle migration. With the aim to contribute to the literature concerning the globalization of the countryside and the new mobilities paradigm, this study focuses on three aspects of the current dynamics in Tafí del Valle: changes in land use related to leisure purposes, the relationship between leisure-induced mobilities, and the way in which actors conduct policies and respond to these dynamics. We gathered empirical data using ethnographic approaches such as semistructured interviews and participant observation during various field stays between 2009 and 2013. This approach emphasizes “the voice of the subjects” in order to show how different actors engage, live, and respond to the globalization of leisure. Findings show that in some cases a sense of migrism (migration + tourism) has replaced theexigence of a deeper analysis of the relation between leisure-oriented types of mobility. Our fieldwork indicates that there is a strong need for academic investigation and for government institutions to consider an analytical step that differentiates between the different types of mobilities that characterize the globalization of leisure destinations in rural areas.

Key words: Tourism; Lifestyle migration; Second homes; Globalization of the countryside; New mobilities

Address correspondence to Gerhard Rainer, Institute of Geography, University of Innsbruck, Innrain 52f, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria. Tel: (+43) 512 507-5417. E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 18, pp. 193-205
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X14101901317237
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Advertising Stories of Second Homes in the Swedish Welfare State

Ingrid Persson

Department of Spatial Planning, Blekinge Institute of Technology, Karlskrona, Sweden

The aim of this article is to discuss the greatest expansion of vacation housing in Sweden for the period of 1960–1980. In focus are product advertisements related to new vacation houses for sale by producers of prefabricated wooden vacation houses. The empirical exploration is based on a content analysis of all issues of a widespread Swedish lifestyle magazine, published monthly between 1960 and 1980. A limited selection of advertisements is further analyzed from a perspective of discourse analysis. The selected advertisements are telling stories, a basic approach in advertising. As a result of the analysis a number of recurring stories can be constructed; the story of freedom of choice and of modern life, the story of multiple dwelling and of the good life, and of family unity. The stories could be stated to be closely connected to crucial values of the “people’s home,” the core principle of the Swedish welfare state.

Key words: Second homes; Welfare state; Modernity; Advertising; Advertisements; Stories; Prefabricated; Wooden; Lifestyle magazine

Address correspondence to Ingrid Persson, Senior Lecturer, Ph.D, Architect SAR/MSA, Department of Spatial Planning, Blekinge Institute of Technology, SE 371 79 Karlskrona, Sweden. Tel: +46 (0) 455 38 53 18; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Tourism Review International, Vol. 18, pp. 207-221
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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/154427214X14101901317273
E-ISSN 1943-4421
Copyright © 2014 Cognizant Comm. Corp.
Printed in the USA. All rights reserved.

Generation Y and Second Homes: Continuity and Change in Finnish Outdoor Recreation

Kati Pitkanen,*† Riikka Puhakka,‡ Jussi Semi,§ and C. Michael Hall¶†

*Environmental Policy Centre, Finnish Environment Institute, Joensuu, Finland
†Centre for Tourism Studies, University of Eastern Finland, Savonlinna, Finland
Palmenia Centre for Continuing Education, University of Helsinki, Lahti, Finland
§Department of Geographical and Historical Studies, University of Eastern Finland, Joensuu, Finland
¶Department of Management, Marketing & Entrepreneurship, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand

Second home tourism is one of the most popular forms of nature-based recreation in Finland and other Nordic countries. A recurrent explanation for its popularity is the idea of postwar Baby Boom generation’s return to their roots in the countryside. Younger generations, however, do not share a similar life history in the countryside and human–nature relationship than older generations. This generational shift may have consequences on the future of second homes as well as rural economies. In this article we ask is Generation Y interested in second home tourism? How important are second homes to their leisure patterns? And what is the role of nature for visiting second homes? The study is based on a survey sent to 4,000 Finnish citizens. The results suggest that interest in second homes will not decline with Generation Y. The youth had access to second homes equally often as older respondents and they were even more eager to get a second home in the future. There were no differences in the valuation of amenities at second homes and the youth did not appreciate services and leisure facilities any more than older respondents. The centrality of the cottage in Finnish life will likely remain strong for many years to come.

Key words: Second home tourism; Outdoor recreation; Human–nature relationship; Generation Y; Youth; Finland

Address correspondence to Kati Pitkanen, Environmental Policy Centre, Finnish Environment Institute, P.O. Box 111, FI - 80101 Joensuu, Finland. Tel: +358295251101; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it