Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research 40(2) Abstracts

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ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RES., INT. J., Vol. 40, pp. 73-86, 2015
Copyright ©2015 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.
0360-1293/15 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/036012915X14381285982840

Transcutaneous Electrical Stimulation Increased Nitric Oxide-Cyclic GMP Release Biocaptured Over Skin Surface of Pericardium Meridian and Acupuncture Points in Humans

Sheng-Xing Ma, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California at Los Angeles and Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90502

Emeran Mayer, M.D.
Professor, Division of Digestive Diseases and Gail and Gerald Oppenheimer Family Center for Neurobiology of Stress, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California at Los Angeles, Torrance, CA 90502

Paul Lee, B.S.
Post-Baccalaureate Student, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90502

Xi-yan Li, R.N.
Research Associate, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90502

Ellen Z. Gao, M.D., A.D.N., L.Ac.
Research Associate, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Torrance, CA 90502

Correspondence: Sheng-Xing Ma, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, LA BioMed at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, 1124 W. Carson Street, RB-1, Torrance, CA 90502, Tel: (310) 222-1964; Fax: (310) 222-4131; E-mail:  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

(Received February 25, 2015; Accepted with revisions June 19, 2015)

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to consecutively capture and quantify nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP, the second messenger of NO, over the skin surface of acupuncture points (acupoints), meridian line without acupoint, andnonmeridian control regions of the Pericardium meridian (PC) in humans, and investigate their response to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Design, setting, and main outcome measures: Adhesive biocapture tubes were attached to the skin surface along PC regions and injected with 2-Phenyl-4,4,5,5- tetramethylimidazoline-3-oxide-1-oxyl solution, an NO-scavenging compound, contacting the skin surface for 20 minutes each during 4 consecutivebiocapture intervals. TENS (1.0 mA, 6 Hz, 1.0 msec duration) was applied over acupoints PC 8 and PC 3 during the 2nd biocapture for 20 min. Total nitrite and nitrate (NOx-), the stable metabolic products of NO, and cGMP in biocapturedsamples were quantified using chemiluminescence and ELISA. Results: NOx- levels in the 1st biocapture over PC regions are almost two fold higher compared to subsequent biocaptures and are higher over PC acupoints versus non-meridian control region. Following TENS, NOx- concentrations over PC regions were significantly increased, and cGMP is predominantly released from the skin surface of PC acupoints. Conclusions: TENS induces elevations of NO-cGMP concentrations over local skin region with a high level at acupoints. The enhanced signal molecules improve local circulation, which contributes to beneficial effects of the therapy.

Keywords: Nitric Oxide; cGMP; Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation; Biocapture; Acupuncture Meridian


ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RES., INT. J., Vol. 40, pp. 87-99, 2015
Copyright ©2015 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.
0360-1293/15 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/036012915X14381285982886

Beneficial and Adverse Effects of Electro-acupuncture Assessed in the Canine Chronic Atrio-ventricular Block Model Having Severe Hypertension and Chronic Heart Failure

Xin Cao, MD(1)
Graduate student, Dept. of Pharmacology

Shengfeng Lu, MD, PhD(2)
Assistant Prof., Key laboratory of Acupuncture and Medicine Research of Ministry of Education

Hiroshi Ohara, MD, PhD(1)
Assistant Prof., Div. of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine

Yuji Nakamura, PhD(1)
Assistant Prof., Dept. of Pharmacolgy

Hiroko Izumi-Nakaseko, PhD(1)
Assistant Prof., Dept. of Pharmacolgy

Kentaro Ando, PhD(1)
Associate Prof., Dept. of Pharmacolgy

Bingmei Zhu, MD, PhD(2)
Professor., Key laboratory of Acupuncture and Medicine Research of Ministry of Education

Bin Xu, MD, PhD(2)
Professor., Key laboratory of Acupuncture and Medicine Research of Ministry of Education

Atsushi Sugiyama, MD, PhD(1)
Professor., Dept. of Pharmacology

1Faculty of Medicine, Toho University, Ota-ku, Tokyo, Japan
2Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China

(Correspondence: Prof. Atsushi Sugiyama, Tel: +81-3-3762-4151 (ext. 2361), Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and Bingmei Zhu, Tel: +86-25-8581-1235, Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )

(Received: May 8, 2015; Accepted with revision: May 18, 2015)

Regarding the effects of electro-acupuncture for severe hypertension, we assessed its acute cardiovascular consequences with 4 subjects of the chronic atrioventricular block dogs having severe hypertension and chronic heart failure. The electro-acupuncture consisting of 2 mA at 2 Hz frequency was carried out for 30 min at Renying (ST-9) and Taichong (LR-3) every other day. Seven sessions were performed within 2 weeks. In the 1st and 7th sessions, the animals were anesthetized with pentobarbital to analyze the effects of the electro-acupuncture on cardiovascular variables. No significant change was detected in any of the basal control values of the cardiohemodynamic or electrophysiological variables between the 1st and 7th sessions. During the 1st session, electo-acupuncture produced a peak increase in mean blood pressure by 8.7% at 35 min (p<0.05), whereas during the 7th session the peak increase was 6.5% at 35 min (p=0.06). There was no significant change in the cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, a product of the heart rate and systolic blood pressure (=double product) reflecting myocardial oxygen consumption, QRS width or QT interval during the electrical stimulation in the 1st or 7th session. The results suggest that electroacupuncture may not exert lethal adverse effect except the vasopressor response,

but that it can decrease the treatment-induced sympathetic response including vasopressor reaction and tachycardia. Since electro-acupuncture may have some potential to induce hypertensive crisis at the beginning, clinicians have to pay attention on its use for patients with hypertension.

Key Words: Electro-acupuncture; Atrio-ventricular block; Severe hypertension; Safety assessment; Heart rate; Blood pressure; Electrocardiogram


ACUPUNCTURE & ELECTRO-THERAPEUTICS RES., INT. J., Vol. 40, pp. 101-136, 2015
Copyright ©2015 Cognizant Communication Corp. Printed in the USA.
0360-1293/15 $60.00 + .00
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3727/036012915X14381285982921

Simple New Method of Detecting Lies By Identifying Invisible Unique Physiological Reflex Response Appearing Often Less Than 10-15 Seconds on the Specific Parts of Face of Lying Person; Quick Screening of Potential Murderers & Problematic Persons

Yoshiaki Omura, M.D., Sc.D., FICAE, FRSM,
Adjunct Prof., Family & Community Medicine Dept., New York Medical College; President & Prof., International College of Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics; Director of Medical Research, Heart Disease Research Foundation; Former Adjunct Prof., Dept. of Pharmacology, Chicago Medical School; Former "Maitre de Recherche" of INSERM (National Institute of Health & Medical Research), France; Former Visiting Prof. of Anesthesiology & Psycho‐Physiology at University of Paris IV

Abdallah Nihrane, Ph.D., FICAE
Visiting Associate Prof. of Integrative Medicine, International College of Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics; Former Assistant Prof., Dept. of Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical School, New York City

Dominic Lu DDS, FICAE,
Clinical Prof. of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, University of Pennsylvania; President of American Society for Advancement of Analgesia in Dentistry

Marilyn K. Jones DDS, MS, FICAE,
Associate Prof. of Holistic Dentistry, International College of Acupuncture & Electrotherapeutics; Director, Holistic Dental Center of Houston; Former Assistant Prof. of Chemistry, University of Houston, Texas

Yasuhiro Shimotsuura MD, FICAE,
President of Japan Bi-Digital O-Ring Test Association; Visiting Prof. of Integrative Medicine, International College of Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics; Executive Director ORT Life Science Research Institute, Kurume City, Japan

Motomu Ohki MS., FICAE (Hon.),
ORT Life Science Research Institute, Kurume City, Japan

(Correspondence: Dr. Omura, 800 Riverside Drive (8-I), New York, N.Y. 10032, Tel: 1 (212) 781-6262; Fax: 1-212-923-2279; E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )

(Received: April 20, 2015; Accepted with revision: June 7, 2015)

Frequently, we cannot find any significant visible changes when somebody lies, but we found there are significant invisible changes appearing in specific areas of the face when somebody lies and their location often depends on whether the lie is serious with or without physical violence involvement. These abnormalities were detected non-invasively at areas: 1) lobules and c) a small round area of each upper lateral side of forehead; 2) the skin between the base of the 2 orifices of the nose and the upper end of upper lip and 3) Alae of both sides of nose. These invisible significant changes usually last less than 15 seconds after telling a lie. In these areas, Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT), which received a U.S. Patent in 1993, became significantly weak with an abnormal value of (-)7 and TXB2, measured non-invasively, was increased from 0.125~0.5ng to 12.5~15ng (within the first 5 seconds) and then went back down to less than 1ng (after 15 seconds). These unique changes can be documented semi-permanently by taking photographs of the face of people who tell a lie, within as short as 10 seconds after saying a lying statement. These abnormal responses appear in one or more of the above-mentioned 3 areas 1), 2) & 3). At least one abnormal pupil with BDORT of (-)8~(-)12 & marked reduction in Acetylcholine and abnormal increase in any of 3 Alzheimer's disease associated factors Apolipoprotein (Apo) E4, β-Amyloid (1-42), Tau protein, viral and bacterial infections were detected in both pupils and forehead of murderers and people who often have problems with others. Analysis of well-known typical examples of recent mass murderers was presented as examples. Using these findings, potential murderers and people who are very likely to develop problems with others can be screened within 5-10 minutes by examining their facial photographs and signatures before school admission or employment.

Key Words: Detecting Lies; Organ Representation Areas of the Face; 3 brain related areas of face; Pupils of Eyes; Ear lobules; Alae of nose; TXB2; Acetylcholine; Apolipoprotein (Apo) E4; β-Amyloid (1-42); Lyme Disease; Borrelia Burgdorferi; Forensic Medicine